Company Expanding into Taiwan, Looking for Reps

Hello All!!

Happy Chinese New Year!

I hope this is being placed in the correct forum, I’m just this side of a newb. :slight_smile:

I’ve got a friend who’s part of a company, http://www.Qivana.com, that is expanding into Taiwan. They’ve been in the US or the past 5 years, and have begun opening offices in Vietnam recently as well.

Some of the people involved have made multi-millions of dollars in NuSkin and Xango, they have joined with this company because of it’s leadership. They’ve just started “opening” Taiwan literally 3 weeks ago, if this is your kind of thing, the timing couldn’t be better. I’m still a little on the fence about it, but would love some input from blokes who’ve been over here for a while about the feasibility of something like this here.

Please comment or PM, and I’ll try to get you more information. If I don’t have the answers your looking for, I can find someone who does.

Thanks so much!

PS. If I’ve posted this in the wrong spot or, this is in poor taste, please advise and forgive, I’ll totally remove it!

ForumosaMax

The Asian Market does seem to be more receptive to MLM’s and Pyramid style opportunities,especially where “health” is concerned. Amway,Herbalife etc are examples of MLM’s.
However you dress these things up,the people at the very top make most of the money,I fear.
It certainly looks too good to be true ,as they all do. Time will tell.Maybe it will work for some, but it is what it is,however well Marketed. :2cents:

Look at the story of Herbalife and the Business Insider article on it, very interesting.

businessinsider.com/bill-ack … on-2012-12

The ‘product’ is only a very incidental part of it. They are classic pyramid schemes where income is almost totally dependent on getting people to buy in below you, either by paying a fee or forcing the new recruits to sell a certain amount per month (whereas they will then just purchase the stuff themselves if they can’t get enough mugs to buy it from them, which is usually the case with these overpriced packets of powder).

The big money can only be made in the first or second layer.

I’ve tried to stay open about these types of companies.

The couple people that I know that are doing them either like the product, know they’re paying premium, so they join for the discount. Or have a very layed back attitude about the whole thing. As in, I’m still friends with them :slight_smile:

My mother-in-law led me to believe that there are a LOT of people into it here in Taiwan, which surprised me. I’m a skeptic, believe me. But honestly, this companies products aren’t anything super-revolutionary, but hey put it together in a way that seems really approachable for people, so I figured, what the heck, why not give a shout-out here and see if anyone’s interested. If not. No worries.

And seriously, thanks for that Herbalife link by Bill Ackman…I’m making my way through the slide show, but it makes me want to see the actual presentation.

There are a lot of people into MLM in Taiwan because there a lot of thick skinned desperate greedy Feckers in Taiwan :slight_smile:. There is also a belief in potions and cures so the two go hand in hand.

Actually there are a couple of more accepted companies like Nuskin and Amway which do well in Taiwan. I don’t have experience with Amway people but if I had a gun I might have used it on the Nuskin crowd who have used deception to try and get me and my wife (independently) to attend their meetings and sign up on the spot.

When I flat out refused to become a ‘member’ by paying a fee the guy and his friend that I knew (who had fooled me into going to the Nuskin meeting by claiming they wanted to discuss some ideas I had for business at the time) practically begged me to join as ‘I would buy them a dinner’ (after they had just bought me a coffee of course) so why would I not become a member to do them a favour. I was furious and to this day refuse to have anything to do with these sad specimens of humanity.

I was given a test using a very dodgy machine which shone a light on my skin which then told me , lo and behold, thaf my blood was too low on the specific vitamin/mineral they were pushing (beta carotene which is simply a vitamin which gives that yellowish colour in carrots and which was the main component of their ‘producf’, of course most schmucks don’t know this…).
I never dared enter the ‘meeting’ itself after that charade.

My wife actually stepped into the room and told me it consisted of people clapping and jumping around for 20 minutes, which was all designed to put pressure on the newbies who had been dragged along to sign up straight away during or after the meeting (she had also not been told this was a nuskin meeting, she had also been invited out on other pretexts). What the newbies dont know is that THEY are the real reason for the meeting and the whole thing is a charade to entrap them. They crowd around you and cajole and use the hard sell.

All these techniques have been borrowed from evangelical religions in the US and it is no surprise that many of these MLM companies are run by Mormons based in Utah.

Well, that and the fact that the state of Utah (like Taiwan) has virtually no laws about that sort of thing.

These things are very popular. Taiwan has plenty of gullible old people with pots of effortlessly-acquired money, and plenty of young people with no life experience. I think there’s also a certain perception that white businessmen with sharp suits and rolexes are honest as the day is long. They must be honest, otherwise they wouldn’t be wearing sharp suits and rolexes. As for those brown south-east asians, now …

That too. Logic is somewhere low down on the list of considerations when deciding to “invest”. A related issue is that very few people here seem to have passed high-school science. These companies are mostly selling “nutrition” or “anti-aging” crap, usually supported by some guy dressed up in a white coat spouting pseudoscience (or wielding dodgy machines with lights). The buying public lap it up, even though most of it is outright lies or gross oversimplification. The products themselves might be real enough (that is, they contain the stated ingredients), but they’re wrapped up in enough layers of marketing that they can charge $50 for something you would normally buy for $5 at Watsons.

That’s what it is Finley. Actually Taiwan has quite robust laws on advertising claims for medical products. The govt agencies in charge actively search for this and they will fine you if you step over the line. They fined my ex boss a pretty penny and they only had the ad up a week or so on the internet.

So what happens is just like you said, selling something that does something that’s worth perhaps $5 for $50.
In the case of Herbalife they actually pay some Nobel prize winning scientist who found the NO effect in blood to give his name to the enterprise. They don’t actually do any real research though.

This is awesome…thanks you two…

It’s funny, because I’m a relatively fit guy, and, of course, this company has a weight loss product. When I was first talking to my friend about it, I had a list of questions a mile long. I’m one of THOSE guys that literally knows what every ingredient is on the label, and whether it’s a thickener, a preservative, whatever. Eventually it got to the point where he said, “Honestly, this stuff isn’t for you. It’s for the lazy people that want a quick fix. Not the guys that are asking the questions and do the research like you.” It’s similar to what FInley said above…It’s almost like, “Well, you’re looking for a magic pill? How about this?”

It’s really tricky sometimes, especially after being money-challenged for long periods to start the thinking that, “Well, SOMEbody’s going to make a bunch of money with this, why not me?” Then again, is that why the world economies crashed a few years ago? Oh god…am I turning into one of THEM???

I mean a piece of me also realizes that any company to some extent is a pyramid scheme (people at the top tend to benefit more than the people at the bottom). But where that line is between relevant work/reward and where it turns into taking advantage of people…referencing your Evangelical observation above, don’t they say that the best Evangelicals are the ones who actually realize the whole thing is baloney?

[quote=“finley”][. I think there’s also a certain perception that white businessmen with sharp suits and rolexes are honest as the day is long. They must be honest, otherwise they wouldn’t be wearing sharp suits and rolexes. …

[quote]
MMM, not sure whether I should take that as a compliment Finley :ponder: I think maybe not :laughing: I won’t wear suits anymore ( except Racing suit) I promise, but can I keep the Rolex?. :stuck_out_tongue:
As mentioned ,Taiwan is probably more receptive to these schemes, than many places.You have to ask if yourself if YOU would be happy with the “hard sell” tactics,maybe?

I have actually been taking Qivana for a few months now. I was really skeptic about the whole thing :loco: , but I have had some stomach problems for years now, and you kind of reach a point where you will try anything to get better, if you have ever been there you would know what I mean :blush: . Anyway, a teacher I work with, his wife sells the stuff, so I just get it from her. It seriously works though. Within a few weeks I was feeling a lot more energetic, and my stomach issues have improved a lot. I haven’t missed a day of work since I started taking it, and I pretty much missed a day or two a month before that. It’s well worth it to not be spending that time in the bathroom anymore :pray: . I have heard that if you are already pretty healthy to begin with, it doesn’t do much for you. But for people with issues like mine I can honestly say it changed everything for me. I have heard about the Herbalife stuff before, and I think Qivana uses the same method of selling, but I don’t know anything about that part of it. Is there anybody on Forumosa that is actually selling this stuff?

I don’t like these schemes. You end up selling the product to your friends and family and it’s hard to mix these relationships when money is involved. You’ll end up being the annoying person that keeps trying to sell them things. It’s not like a B2B sales job dealing with people in a professional settings. These schemes asks you to sell through your personal life.

It isn’t a coincidence that one new poster talks about a company, and then another new poster talks about how successful he has been with company. This should all be considered advertising and designated as such.

No health supplement has a secret that another one doesn’t have. If you’re concerned about health, find a reputable company and get what you need.

If you want to spend your own money and lose friends and family that think you’re crazy, then join an MLM company.

I’ve never heard of Qivana, so I went to the website and clicked on the Company Overview tab. This company overview has 372 words–the majority being confidence building buzz words–and yet I still have no idea what this company sells/does. All I know is that I can somehow be an owner.

[quote=“headhonchoII”]…
I was given a test using a very dodgy machine which shone a light on my skin which then told me , lo and behold, thaf my blood was too low on the specific vitamin/mineral they were pushing (beta carotene which is simply a vitamin which gives that yellowish colour in carrots and which was the main component of their ‘producf’, of course most schmucks don’t know this…).
…[/quote]

β-carotene (beta-carotine) is a strongly colored red-orange pigment abundant in plants and fruits. It is an organic compound and chemically is classified as a hydrocarbon according Wikipedia … a precursor to vitamin A

[quote]β-carotene, a precursor form of vitamin A typical of vegetable sources such as carrots, is selectively converted into retinoids, so it does not cause hypervitaminosis A; however, overconsumption can cause carotenosis, a benign condition in which the skin turns orange.[/quote] Benign? Running around like an orange? :ponder: :ohreally: :smiley:

Therefor, for many people it won’t last long and friendships, family ties will suffer … BTW, same goes for (well known) insurance companies, many use the same sales techiniques.

[quote=“tango42”]It isn’t a coincidence that one new poster talks about a company, and then another new poster talks about how successful he has been with company. This should all be considered advertising and designated as such.

No health supplement has a secret that another one doesn’t have. If you’re concerned about health, find a reputable company and get what you need.

If you want to spend your own money and lose friends and family that think you’re crazy, then join an MLM company.[/quote]
It would be easier to go to a professional … doctor?

That’s exactly how I feel about these things too. I once worked for Aflac in LA, and it was a load of crap. They gave you a week of training and then asked you to cold call businesses that never ever wanted to talk to you. Basically, you had to sell it to your family if you wanted to survive at the beginning. I hated that, so I quit. Total waste of time. Part of me feels like if Qivana is such a good product they should just sell it in stores. I have no idea why they don’t do that. But I have taken it and it has helped me a lot. I just wish I could find a way to get it for cheaper.

[quote=“Belgian Pie”]
It would be easier to go to a professional … doctor?[/quote]

Been to lost of doctors here and in the US. I have been taking Nexium and gascon for 3 years now. It helps, but doesn’t seem to make me any better, just deals with the symptoms.

After it got really bad again last year I asked my gastroenterologist in Taipei about “fecal transplants” which have been in the news lately. Apparently it is amazingly effective, and works like a cure the first time it’s done. The doctor actually told me I was disgusting for asking about it. Thanks doc, I just wanted to know more about it from a professional. I guess he’s never felt the pain I have suffered. Anyways, I went to medical school in LA for a semester before flunking out. Not that I think I know a lot about medicine or anything from my experience, but I did learn that doctors think they know everything, and are most often mistaken about that.