Coronavirus - America (November 2020)

US official superspreading covid-19 on Europe tour.

On the Sunday before the election, John Oliver has dropped his latest—and perhaps most scathing—assessment of how the current administration has (mis)handled the COVID crisis.

It may be too late for most forumosans to vote this year, but it’s not too late to feel rage, and even shame.

Guy

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Yeah, well, he’s got a sewer plant named after himself. Enuff said.

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It is the all consuming crises in the US. Tragically, it is going to get a lot worse in the months ahead.

Every indicator used to track the coronavirus — cases, hospitalizations, hospital capacity, positivity rates and deaths — is flashing bright red warning signs that the pandemic is surging across vast swaths of the country, just as people return indoors and families make plans for Thanksgiving.

One justification for the six-week spring lockdown — which not all states followed — was to “flatten the curve,” so that cases didn’t simply overwhelm hospitals. The intensity of the coming winter wave could again bring parts of the country to that precipice. And if local health systems and hospitals are overwhelmed, it threatens not just the clinical progress against Covid-19 but patients with all sorts of other diseases and conditions.

Already, hospitals systems in the midwestern U.S. and mountain regions are tapping ad hoc surge capacity and transferring patients across state borders to prevent ICUs from overflowing.

Apologies if this has been posted before.

From a March 30 Today news show interview of Dr. Deborah Birx, White House Coronavirus Task Force (from about 3:12 to about 3:47):

–“Dr. Deborah Birx predicts up to 200,000 deaths ‘if we do things almost perfectly,’” Today, March 30, 2020

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Not far off a perfect response then.

Nice find, sir!

In two weeks time things could be really bad.

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Thanks!

That’s my fear, too.

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What an absolute mess.

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It is going to get much worse now.

Rural US is being hit hard.

A post was merged into an existing topic: Coronavirus Open Thread (October/November 2020)

That’s all I hear about now. That’s all I hear. Turn on television—‘Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid.’ A plane goes down. 500 people dead, they don’t talk about it," Trump told his supporters at a campaign rally in Lumberton, North Carolina, on October 24th. “Covid, Covid, Covid, Covid.’ By the way, on November 4, you won’t hear about it anymore,”

Apparently, Trump was off a little bit.

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A couple of weeks ago, I posted about the surge of cases in South Dakota. “Yea, what about the deaths, smarty pants?” was the reply.

South Dakota on Wednesday reported 27 new COVID-19 deaths, one of the state’s highest single-day totals during the pandemic.

The Department of Health has already reported 142 deaths during the month of November, setting a pace of deaths likely to surpass October’s 202 reported deaths. During that month, South Dakota had the nation’s second-highest number of COVID-19 deaths per capita, according to Johns Hopkins data.

The 27 deaths reported Tuesday was the second-highest single-day tally yet. The highest single-day death toll came last week with 28.

The state has spent weeks dealing with one of the nation’s worst rates for coronavirus cases per capita. There were 1,882 new cases per 100,000 people over the past two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. That means that roughly one out of every 53 people has tested positive in the past two weeks.

Hospitalizations had soared to new highs this week, but dropped for the first time in five days on Wednesday. There are currently 543 people hospitalized by the virus, health officials reported.

Some people can’t seem to grasp the sequence:
Cases are followed by hospitalizations, hospitalizations are followed by deaths.

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Perhaps some people can grasp the sequence, but are questioning the predicted death rates that are being used to dictate public health policy.

It might be helpful for you to repost your original cases in South Dakota post. That would make it easier for people to comment.

North Dakota number #1!

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My state is surrounded by red states whose hospitals are full. Where do you think they’re sending their patients?

I felt like a refugee running from this madness.

Hang in there! Dark days are ahead, but light is coming in the form of the recent vaccine news.

In his latest uploaded video, Ian Bremmer at GZERO Media explains it like this: if you’re on a threadmill and running, you’re eventually likely to collapse—when will this end? But when you’re running a marathon with three miles left, you can find some gas in the tank and make it to the finish line.

Guy

South Dakota…

The seven-day positivity rate is also alarmingly high – at nearly 60%, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project – higher than any other state in the US,

The South Dakota governor’s office disputed CTP’s positivity rate, instead saying theirs is just over 21%, according to the state’s Department of Health data. South Dakota does not provide the number of new tests that were administered in a single day, making it impossible to tabulate a 7-day average and get a complete view on the positivity rate.

… because the governor is a lying covidiot

North Dakota’s coronavirus mortality rate is the highest of any U.S. state or country, according to an analysis of data from last week conducted by the Federation of American Scientists. The analysis shows that North Dakota has a rate of 18.2 deaths per 1 million people. South Dakota, meanwhile, has 17.4 deaths per million, the third-worst rate in the world.

North Dakota’s coronavirus mortality rate is the highest of any U.S. state or country, according to an analysis of data from last week conducted by the Federation of American Scientists. The analysis shows that North Dakota has a rate of 18.2 deaths per 1 million people. South Dakota, meanwhile, has 17.4 deaths per million, the third-worst rate in the world.

Progress
“1) Sure, people are getting infected, but they’re not being hospitalized
2) Sure, people are being hospitalized, but they’re not dying.
3) Sure, people are dying, but who cares?”

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