Costco Thread 2023

Do you people not have freezers? I just put all the meat in the freezer until the morning (or evening before) I plan on using it. Sometimes I need to run it under warm water to thaw it out, but if you’re cooking it right away, such prep methods are way safer than leaving raw meat in the fridge for days on end.

1 Like

I have tapped a few squeezing into tight spaces

1 Like

They do

I freeze the vacuum bags, never open until use because it is sealed. If I sniff and there is an odor, I rinse the breast

I think in the fridge until the best before date, and even a few days later, is fine. That said, if it is a few days after it’s going into a spicy and heavily seasoned curry just in case

1 Like

Yeah, I have a freezer. It’s full of stuff from Costco I haven’t got around to using yet and am too lazy to defrost. :roll_eyes:

4 Likes

NEVER RINSE CHICKEN!!!

1 Like

Nah, urban myth as far as I’m concerned. I don’t care what the U.S. FDA says. I’m rinsing chicken when it smells off. :whistle:

IIRC, the argument for not rinsing it is just that you can spray the surface pathogens around the kitchen? Kind of prefer that to all of them going in the food.

3 Likes

They’re still in the food after a rinse. Both in the surface and inside. Cooking the food is a far more effective way of killing pathogens.

Yeah, I know, and I’m cooking the food either way…after rinsing a proportion of them and their metabolic products and slime off under the tap first. I’m aware the chicken doesn’t end up sterilized after washing.

2 Likes

I just read up on this, never saw it before. Actually the logic is sound, the process of washing increases chance of contamination. But in my case, I’m very careful not to splash the water or let my chickened hands touch anything, I’m even careful to use separate knife and cutting board and put these in the sink first (there is photo evidence of this on the recipe thread). I’m sure there are people that are less careful, but if i put contaminated chicken on the cutting board and use the knife to cut it, i still have to wash those things don’t I? I’d rather continue to open the bag over the sink, check, and then gently rinse over an empty sink before I transfer to the cutting board. 95% of the time it smells fine and I dont rinse, anyways. I’ll probably continue to do so, although the logic that you don’t need to rinse the chicken if you’re going to cook it also makes sense

no need to get all caps about it, just be smart

3 Likes

Yeah, me too. I’m also pretty careful to watch what I’m touching and to wash everything in hot water after, but I don’t care too much if something gets aerosolized around the kitchen (this hasn’t killed me yet). I tend to rinse the packaging anyway before putting it in the garbage, especially in the summer, so it doesn’t smell bad too fast, and I’m spraying the dead-animal bacteria around the kitchen then anyway. :man_shrugging:

2 Likes

I don’t care how it smells, I’m washing that shit. How do I know what’s touched it? If it smells bad I’ll toss it

People take it really seriously in the US. The farm-to-table pipeline is more involved there. I suspect there is a higher risk for contamination under those circumstances.

4 Likes

Yeah, I probably miswrote before - I generally rinse it irrespective of the smell. The only time I don’t is when I’ve bought pre-sliced chicken breast from Carrefour (which is rare), because the small pieces are too fiddly for me to be bothered.

2 Likes

Yeah, same. My freezer is full, particularly now with pre-LNR stock up. Pizza, bagels, etc. take up a lot of room. Meats I freeze from Costco are steaks and pork tenderloins as you have to buy them in such large quantities and I don’t cook them as often as chicken. In my experience things can take a couple of days to defrost and I often get busy and they wind up staying in the fridge anyway or I might not be in the mood for what I defrosted.

Chicken is easily 80% of my meat consumption. I buy larger packages of chicken breasts at RT Mart, apply seasonings and bake them in large baking containers. Then they’re ready in the fridge anytime. I get home late and one less cooking task is a time/energy saver. Same with rice, make a large batch on the weekend and put it in containers for use during the week. Then I just need to chop and stir fry veggies and steam heat the rice and chicken together. Much easier than having to do all three and the bonus of less cleanup.

Can you keep it down a bit? Being New Year’s and all it would be nice to have a little quiet. I used to rinse chicken breasts until I read up and learned it’s unnecessary so I stopped but just to save a step. If you do rise them carefully and wash your hands you won’t splash about and contaminate your kitchen.

I used to worry about salmonella but not anymore. I did rinse the wings I baked last night because they had just begun to have an odor. After the rinse they were fine. I rarely have this problem but the wings were the last on the shelf and were marked down as they were “expiring” that day. Baked them 2 days over date, they were good and I did not get dysentery.

Yeah, right for sure. This I do religiously. Cross-contamination is one of the biggest cooking dangers.

Yes, same. Especially those tight plastic ones from Costco.

2 Likes

Can’t you just picture the people picking up the sponge and wiping their chicken over a sinkful of dishes? For such people, the warning is helpful!

2 Likes

Yes, and there are even bigger dangers in the kitchen cooking chicken:

1 Like