Denied entry after changing USA Passport to "POB: Taipei"?

When I received my US passport, it said “Place of Birth: Taiwan” on the personal data page.
I went to the local passport agency that issued it and said I objected to having it listed as
such.

The U.S. Department of State regulations specifically allowed US citizens who were born
outside of the US to list the city of birth. I spoke to the supervisor passport specialist and
requested that they issue me a new passport showing “Place of Birth: Taipei” and they
issued me a new US passport showing “Place of Birth: Taipei” the very next day.

Here’s the State Dept’s Foreign Affairs Manual says about this subject:
“7 FAM 1300 APPENDIX D - PLACE OF BIRTH NAMES IN PASSPORTS”
state.gov/documents/organization/94675.pdf

However, the supervisor did give me a leaflet that cautioned me about using the name of
the city of birth. Apparently there are a few countries that will deny entry to people whose
US passport does not show country of birth. Is Taiwan one of those countries?

Mine doesn’t, and I’m here.

“US passport does not show country of birth.”

Not sure exactly what you are saying here…but, every USA passport I have had, going back to my 1st in 1959, and including my current one, have all had my state and country of birth listed on them. As in ‘state of birth, U.S.A’. Not the city of birth.
They have never listed a city in reference to a ‘Place of birth.’ Only a state. It has always been the state followed by country.
So yes, the USA passport does list the country of birth on it.
As far as I can remember, this hold for other countries passports as well - but others would know more specifics as to the formats of their passports.

[quote=“TainanCowboy”]“US passport does not show country of birth.”

[/quote]

This only applies to US citizens who were born OUTSIDE of the USA.

For example, a US citizen who was born in Vienna, Austria, normally gets
a US passport that says “Place of Birth: Austia”… but if he/she objects
to this for whatever reason, the State Dept will issue a replacement
passport that says “Place of Birth: Vienna”(city of birth)

For US citizens who were born in the USA(or US territories), the State
Dept does NOT allow you to list your city of birth as your place of
birth on US passports. Example: if your were born in Omaha, Nebraska,
then “Nebraska, U.S.A.” is the only possible words after “Place of Birth”
on your US passport.

As I mentioned above, here’s the complete US State Dept regulations
on this issue: state.gov/documents/organization/94675.pdf

Write three or four emails to whichever ministry deals with exit/entry of foreigners and ask your question. You’ll get three or four different answers. Choose the one you like best. Voila!

My passport just says “Place of birth: London”. But of course it says “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland” at the top of the page. Hope that helps.

I read this a couple of times and must be stupid or something.

Firstly, why did you object in the first place? What is so offensive about it?

Secondly, if any country did the unlikely and refused you entry based on the listing of Taipei vs Taiwan, surely Taiwan of all places is the most understanding as to the variations of such things.

MIne has always read Place of Birth : CHINA. And this was of course when Taiwan was part of the Republic of China.

Once in Taipei the Immigration guy said ““you are born in China?”” This was way back when that was not a good thing for entry to Taiwan. And I said ““yeah, Taiwan is the Republic of China right??””. That shut him up. :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

I was born in Taipei, the Republic of China…hence the China. I would prefer it to read Taiwan though but its quite a hassle to change it I think.

no, it’s actually quite easy to change. just tell the passport agency what you
want on your US passport, and refer to the State Dept’s regulations in the PDF
linke I posted a few replies above.

Assuming you were born in the city of Taipei, there are only 3 possible choices.
Anything else will be rejected by the passport agency. You can choose to have
your US passport to show"Place of Birth:" as:

(1)
China

(2)
Taiwan

(3)
TAIPEI

Based on all the policy/regulations that the State Dept has published, it’s clear
that they view those three like this: (1) is a country name(as in “one-China”)
(2) is a region name(Taiwan not considered a “nation”), and (3) is a city name.

my old one showed TAIWAN, and I asked them to change it to TAIPEI and they
didn’t even charge me a fee, since my US passport was issued within the last
12 months. No forms to fill out, just a signed note from me indicating my
preference.

If your US passport was issued more than 12 months ago, they may charge you
a fee… in which case just wait until your next passport renewal to make the
change.

The US passport policy is strange… Almost every EU, UK, Canada, and Australian passport
just use city name as place of birth. For example, my co-worker, who was born in Taichung,
has “Place of Birth: Taichung” in his UK passport after he became a naturalised UK citizen.

Place of birth is a city … not a country … a logic that’s followed in Belgium

Logic is not a popular concept for the US government. :slight_smile:

I don’t get the logic of going through all this in the first place. Had a good think and nope, still don’t get it.

it’s actually an easy process… send back you US passport in an envelope(42 cents),
write a one sentence note that says “I want to use Taipei instead…” wait 8 days
and they’ll send you back a new passport.

too put it shortly, Taipei is just a city… using the city name in the US passport
indicates that neither China nor Taiwan has sovereignty.

It’s the same reason that the US State Dept only allows “Jerusalem” to be listed as
the place of birth in US passports for anyone who was born in Jerusalem. (whether
they thnk of themselves as Israeli or Palestinian) See this document for official
US policy: state.gov/documents/organization/94675.pdf (also part
of the reason that the US has so far refused to move the US embassy to the true
Israeli capital of Jerusalem)

[quote]It’s the same reason that the US State Dept only allows “Jerusalem” to be listed as
the place of birth in US passports for anyone who was born in Jerusalem.[/quote]

Which is logical, isn’t it? I won’t put a place on my passport that I wasn’t born in …

[quote=“Belgian Pie”][quote]It’s the same reason that the US State Dept only allows “Jerusalem” to be listed as
the place of birth in US passports for anyone who was born in Jerusalem.[/quote]

Which is logical, isn’t it? I won’t put a place on my passport that I wasn’t born in …[/quote]

Jerusalem is a city whose political status is disputed by all sides. Which country
is it located in? Israel or Palestine? That’s a political question which has yet
to be determined.

How would you feel if you were a Palestinian and your US passport says Place of
Birth: Israel
? If you walk into a group of Palestinians and yell “Jerusalem, Israel”
you won’t come out alive. :frowning:

Or, if you were an Israeli and your US passport says Place of Birth: Palestine?
(there are several federal court cases where people in these situations have sued
the US State Dept, but in all cases, the federal judges sided with the US govt,
and as of earlier this year, one case still remains in the appeals process)

The US State Dept’s official policy of listing only “Place of Birth: Jerusalem” may
offend both Israelis and Palestinians, but at least it is a somewhat neutral policy.
(what’s that old saying? if you make both sides unhappy, then you must be doing
something right! :slight_smile: )

If I had my way, I would put it like this: [b]PLACE OF BIRTH: EARTH /b :smiley:

I thought they wanted your birth certificate again if you want to make a change? Sure they dont need it?

Well, I guess I can see a tiny bit of reasoning there, however, at the end of the day a passport is not “yours”, it still belongs to the government so they really are doing you a favor by changing it just because you feel offended.

I just took a look at mine, and it just lists the city, not the country.
You’d think the US passport people would just put ‘Taipei’ anyway. If your were a NZer, your passport POB would say “Taipei” as standard.

Thanks Joe that helped quite a lot. Now I won’t have to look in my passport for your place pf birth

that’s what I thought, but apparently they(the State Dept / Nat’l Passport Center) have
my info in their system. That’s not surprising, since they surely kept all may data during
my immigration process from greencard to naturalization.

I mailed in my passport and a small note describing my desire to make the change. They
called me two days later and said that they got it… and wanted to confirm that I wanted to
want to make the change. I said yes and was advised that the new passport would be in
the mail that very same day. I received the new passport a few days later.

Like I said, this “Place of Birth” is just limited to the US passport. Most, if not all European
countries use the city name only.

[quote=“RedSarah”]
However, the supervisor did give me a leaflet that cautioned me about using the name of
the city of birth. Apparently there are a few countries that will deny entry to people whose
US passport does not show country of birth. Is Taiwan one of those countries?[/quote]

The main reason is for Taiwan born males during conscription age, but this makes me wonder, someone could enter with place of birth “China” and pretending he’s from somewhere in the Mainland easily.

I’m wondering what countries would give such a fuss or deny entry for US passport holders with Place of Birth “Taiwan” since they don’t recognize, to me a US citizenship IS US citizenship. I’ll make sure I’d never visit there.