Do I have realistic expectations?

Translation of that part is “The qualifications must indicate that they are permitted to teach the subject involved in the country that issued their qualifications”.

That means a teacher with a licence of TEOS is not eligible, because that licence is only to teach foreign kids and not to teach all kids in the home country.

What about this part?

應能證明他們得於母國教授這門課程

This.

“得” means “possible”.

my guess is already issued work permits are valid till their expiration dates. After that, many schools may be in trouble.

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I’ve taught and worked in a university here. No education degree required. Uni teaching isn’t a great gig

Many foreigners don’t need a work permit to work.

Yes, but do these qualifactions stand true for everyone regardless of ARC status?

If they don’t need ARCs, foreigners with degree can teach as substitute teachers or teachers of supplemental classes.

If the translation is that you just be permitted to teach in your home country, then Americans can teach without a certificate.

I’ve taught in Philadelphia without a certificate. The state of Pennsylvania declared a teacher shortage and permits schools to hire non-certified teachers by applying for an emergency certification. Anyone with the appropriate University degree is eligible for the emergency certification… but most schools frown upon it. I had a really hard time finding a job in Pennsylvania because I kept on being passed up for jobs when people with “real” certifications came along. However, when it comes to Taiwan, there’s nothing in the law about having competitive credentials.

There are several other states that have declared shortages and allow non-certified teachers. I can look them up if anyone’s interested.

If you dont have certification and you apply for emergency certification, then would you not then be certified?

You would still need to show Taiwan your emergency certification, so…

I apologise if my advice was ambiguous.

If @TheGuy is a resident of a state that issues emergency certifications, he should apply before leaving the States. Read a few books, take two tests, and write an essay. It’s really not hard.

@TheGuy, what state are you in?

EDIT: You don’t have to be a resident of a state to get the emergency certification in that state… since you won’t be using the certification in that state. But you might not want to drive across the country to take the tests.

EDIT: Note that the emergency certification process costs upwards of $3,000USD.

Fyi

CSPG No. 13 Emergency Permits - Pennsylvania Department of Education
http://www.education.pa.gov/teachers%20-%20administrators/certifications/pages/default.aspx&ved=2ahUKEwjSzvOVy-TaAhUB2LwKHRKmAFAQFjAEegQIAxAB&usg=AOvVaw1qOnK7XoVJgTSx-2O7uomq

Is this recognized by taiwan?

There are a LOT of routes to certification. I can think of a dozen different routes. We need more information from the OP to pinpoint which one is best for him. I’m not going to list them ALL unless I knew someone would find them helpful (because that would be a lot of work)

@tando, the route you posted requires that the school apply. This would mean that the OP would have to get a teaching job in the States, then he would be get an emergency certification. After a few years, some paperwork, and a good teaching record, that would turn into a “real” certification.

There are other routes. You can get certified without finding a job first through other routes.

It all depends on the OP’s state.

Do you mean there are other route to get the emergency certificate for Pennsylvania? I asked this because I have an impression that you are recommending to get the one. But if not, never mind. That is my misunderstanding.

I’ve seen job ads that would accept a sub teaching license. Those can be very easy to get even in Taiwan.

There are many ways to get a certification if you’re in your home country.

I mentioned emergency certifications because they’re the easiest to get. Very little work involved.

But emergency certifications are a subset of alternative certification routes. I’d recommend any of these to the OP, depending on his situation. (EDIT: I apologise for the fact that I’ve been using these terms interchangeably in my previous posts. I’ve been talking the way I normally speak to teachers who are familiar with all the various routes. That might be why some of my vocabulary might have been confusing. I’ve been a bit sloppy)

But once the OP leaves his home country, his options will be severely limited. He will still have an option or two, but not the plethora of different routes to choose from that someone would have who is still in his home country. I went to Taiwan without a certification, later decided I wanted to be certified, and didn’t like any of the options I had in Taiwan, and had to come back to the States for three years… getting certified was then a piece of cake. Then I could head back to Taiwan again. I’d definitely recommend getting certified before you leave instead of following the path I took.

@TheGuy, here’s what I need to know:

  • In what state do you currently reside? Do you have friends you can crash with in other states? If your current state doesn’t allow alternative certification routes, you might have to drive to be next state over… but you need to do this on two separate occasions. If you’re willing to drive across the country, you probably don’t want to do this twice.
  • Are you willing to relocate to another state for a few months before you head off to Taiwan?
  • Do you want to get a certification? How important is this to you? Would you mind it if you couldn’t teach except in a buxiban? Some certification routes are easier than others, but with ALL of them, it’s possible to fail and not end up with a certification.
  • How much are you willing to spend on a certification? Some cost a few hundred USD… others a few thousand.
  • How much work are you willing to put into a certification? Some routes just require you to take a few tests. Others require you to volunteer as a teacher for a few months.
  • How much time do you have before you must leave the country? Some certification routes take a few weeks… others a few years.
  • Is there a chance that, if you love teaching, you might want to come back and teach in the States? (You’ll have to pay extra for this option, both in money and several months of your time. But if you don’t choose this option now, it’s very unlikely that you’ll ever be able to teach in the States. Some certification routes are so off-brand that US schools won’t hire you unless there are no other applicants. But these certifications are completely legit, and thus recognized in Taiwan)

There are too many alternative teacher certification routes to list in this post. But I can help you find the route best for you.

NOTE: Shorter/easier certification routes are more expensive. So, you’ll have to choose between saving money and saving time/effort.

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Thank you Caspain for taking the time to write such a detailed response! I am sorry it took me so long to reply. I’ve been very busy at work, but I should have taken the time to get back to you.

In what state do you currently reside? Do you have friends you can crash with in other states? If your current state doesn’t allow alternative certification routes, you might have to drive to be next state over… but you need to do this on two separate occasions. If you’re willing to drive across the country, you probably don’t want to do this twice.
Are you willing to relocate to another state for a few months before you head off to Taiwan?

I live in Michigan, but have friends in other states. I could stay for a week or two in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida and maybe Cali.

Do you want to get a certification? How important is this to you? Would you mind it if you couldn’t teach except in a buxiban? Some certification routes are easier than others, but with ALL of them, it’s possible to fail and not end up with a certification.
How much are you willing to spend on a certification? Some cost a few hundred USD… others a few thousand.
How much work are you willing to put into a certification? Some routes just require you to take a few tests. Others require you to volunteer as a teacher for a few months.
How much time do you have before you must leave the country? Some certification routes take a few weeks… others a few years.

I don’t mind teaching at Buxiban at first, especially if it will allow me to save $1000 a month. I’ve heard that becoming a licensed substitute teacher is relatively easy in the states. Would that allow me to teach outside of Buxibans?

Is there a chance that, if you love teaching, you might want to come back and teach in the States? (You’ll have to pay extra for this option, both in money and several months of your time. But if you don’t choose this option now, it’s very unlikely that you’ll ever be able to teach in the States. Some certification routes are so off-brand that US schools won’t hire you unless there are no other applicants. But these certifications are completely legit, and thus recognized in Taiwan)

I doubt I would teach in America. Teaching to me is a way to get to Asia, and if I return I will work in my current field again. If there is a way I can move to Taiwan and teach at a Buxiban, while earning a certificate online, that would be ideal.

Thanks again for your reply!

it seems a substitute teacher license is recognised. But please confirm it. At this moment, a license of TESL or TEFL doesn’t allow you to teach at regular elementary - high schools. Licensed teachera of science, math, technology etc. can teach those subjects in english. To teach English, you need a license allowing you to teach English in your country, such as English literacy teacher license.

You’re right that getting a licence for substitute teaching is really simple. But in my opinion, it’s not worth it.

Based off your responses, I think you might want to check out [edit]. It’s not available in your state, but it’s available in a few of the states you listed. It’s a bit expensive, but the salary raise you’ll get for having a certificate will more than pay for the cost of the certificate process several times over.

This is the only program that will give you a certificate after taking two tests. It’s that simple. Note, however, that the tests are tricky. They’re not hard per se… But you definitely need to study. For example, I remember one question on the practice test asking “what is the best way to introduce a lesson on rectangles?” If you’re not familiar with modern education theory, you might be miffed that there could possibly be a “best” lesson intro on rectangles. But with enough reading and study, you can start to get the hang of what they’re looking for in terms of answers.

They will issue you a real teaching certificate which is recognized by the US Department of Education. It’s not a temporary certificate, substitute certificate, or a TEFL ccertificate. It certifies you to be a full-time subject teacher in the States. However, it’s frowned upon by almost every school in the States. I have a certificate from this program and US schools look at it as if I graduated from Hillbilly University. But Taiwanese schools don’t know this. It looks real official and even if they call the US department of education, they will confirm that is real. But since you said you won’t want to teach in the States, this would be a good option for you. Just be warned that if you end up loving teaching, coming back to the States to teach won’t be a real option.

EDIT: I deleted the name of the program because I don’t want word to get out that this is a Hillbilly certificate. I’ve used my certificate to get a job at a very competitive school in Taipei and I’d like to keep my certificate worth something! @TheGuy, I PM’d you the info.

If anyone else is interested, PM me.

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Where do you find positions for this, would TeaLit.com have private elemntary school openings?

Yes. Or, locate schools on a map and ask if they have any openings in your subject area. If you’re certified, it’s an easy in.