Do you have a work permit? TV wants to know


#1

My, what a lovely twisted expose tv programme on S TV tonite.
Some woman going around asking foreigners if they had work permits (night club singers, night market vendors, bushiban teachers, etc)
They even interviewed a Russian prostitute.
What’s up with all this?
Why is it such a big issue so they humiliate people on tv and make all ‘high noses’ look like trash?
I recognised quite a few people in the clips taken at 45, 99, Blue Note.

Can you imagine CNN going to sweat shops in NYC asking Chinese if they’re legal immigrants?


#2

How can this kind of show work?

“Hi do you have a work permit?”

“Yes.”

“Oh. OK. Look, there’s another one – Tell me sir, do you have a work permit?”

“Yes.”

“Oh. OK.”
Ad infinitum.

If you ask me, they’re only humiliating themselves.


#3

Make the show interesting… Say you immigrated illegally, but managed to buy a work permit from a senior gov’t official for 30k. That’ll keep 'em busy… :smiling_imp:


#4

Maoman, will that show repeat again? Would love to see it. FUNNY!

Is that the channel that repeats shows again and again? I will try to catch it?

A few weeks ago I saw a similar show with a woman reporter going around asking local Taiwanese if they could give her directions to some place in English? Just to embarrass them?

Is this reality Tv come to Taiwan, Taiwan-style?

Or is it a harbinger of things to come media wise? UGH!


#5

One musician guy told them they were asking a ‘personal question’ and then turned from the camera, so I believe they invaded his privacy. The Indian guy buggered off from the night market stall where they pursued him. The white teacher types just smiled and said they didn’t know what the hell they were talking about when they stopped them (going into bushibans!!) to ask, “Do you know some foreigners are using student visas to teach here illegally?”

That’s not all. Later, this same nosy reporter went up to drunk-as-skunk foreigners in pubs to ask about Taiwanese women. The drunks answered that women here were ‘naughty’ and would do ‘anything’, while America’s Most Wanted theme music played background.

I highly recommend shying away from all cameras around Taiwan, even if you don’t have a thing to hide. This kind of reporting makes it seem like we all do!


#6

I would give a long fantastic story if they ever interviewed me because I have nothing to fear. If I was illegal, I would just give a quick “yes”.


#7

I think its not the reporter thing.
It’s the audience. They only concoct news for the mediocre audicnce.

Like my dad used to say: ‘the actor’s fool, the audience drools’

ax


#8

[quote=“ax”]I think its not the reporter thing.
It’s the audience. They only concoct news for the mediocre audicnce.

Like my dad used to say: ‘the actor’s fool, the audience drools’

ax[/quote]

I agree. It’s the people at home who create a market for this crap.


#9

Is S TV the station that I am thinking of? It doesn’t surprise me. Once they wanted to interview a friend and I in a coffee shop here for what they said was just a show about foreigners and their lives here. In reality, what they did was place phony lonelyheart ads in the papers and try to match us with an unsuspecting woman. Keep in mind the ads these women thought they were answering were for a 40ish wealthy expat type, not the 20-something pauper I was at the time. The gag was to film the reaction of the woman. Nice, heh? Needless to say the woman was pissed and so was I. I was furious at them at their offices later that afternoon. Of course, no managers would come out to talk to me, but I nearly got beaten up by some camera idiot.

Pathetic. Just pathetic.


#10

[quote=“Flicka”]Is S TV the station that I am thinking of? It doesn’t surprise me. Once they wanted to interview a friend and I in a coffee shop here for what they said was just a show about foreigners and their lives here. In reality, what they did was place phony lonelyheart ads in the papers and try to match us with an unsuspecting woman. Keep in mind the ads these women thought they were answering were for a 40ish wealthy expat type, not the 20-something pauper I was at the time. The gag was to film the reaction of the woman. Nice, heh? Needless to say the woman was pissed and so was I. I was furious at them at their offices later that afternoon. Of course, no managers would come out to talk to me, but I nearly got beaten up by some camera idiot.

Pathetic. Just pathetic.[/quote]

That sounds good. Did the program air?


#11

Here I am again.

We had a young lady from a radio show at or offices a while back. First she wanted know about what we thought about Weiya, then she wanted to know what we thought about Taiwanese girls. I think we gave her a lot of BS to put on the air. Psycho Xiaojie’s and all that.
:smiling_imp:

Honestly, as Iam married to a local, she wanted to know how we made a cross-cultural marriage work. My answer: I have no idea :sunglasses: .


#12

…well, for a marriage to be said to “work,” it would have to pass the test of time. Be patient… :laughing:


#13

…well, for a marriage to be said to “work,” it would have to pass the test of time. Be patient… :laughing:[/quote]

I know. We got married in 1996, but there was no way I was going to answer such a smart question. (She had just expressed astonishment over the fact that I am still in regular contact with my parents - so by then I thought her nice, but ignorant of the wider world).


#14

And those ignorant ones perpetuate even more blatant ignorance for the viewing public!! :smiling_imp:


#15

why on earth would that reporter be astonished that you are still in touch with your parents? HUH? Does she think all foreginers who marry Tiawnawese stop contacting their parents? I do not understand this thinking… pls explain a bit more, thanks

F


#16

[quote=“Mr He”][quote=“Flicka”]Is S TV the station that I am thinking of? It doesn’t surprise me. Once they wanted to interview a friend and I in a coffee shop here for what they said was just a show about foreigners and their lives here. In reality, what they did was place phony lonelyheart ads in the papers and try to match us with an unsuspecting woman. Keep in mind the ads these women thought they were answering were for a 40ish wealthy expat type, not the 20-something pauper I was at the time. The gag was to film the reaction of the woman. Nice, heh? Needless to say the woman was pissed and so was I. I was furious at them at their offices later that afternoon. Of course, no managers would come out to talk to me, but I nearly got beaten up by some camera idiot.

Pathetic. Just pathetic.[/quote]
That sounds good. Did the program air?[/quote]
No. They told me what was going on after they got set up in a coffee shop and were about to shoot and I wouldn’t do it. The chick, or I should say the poor woman who thought she was about to rope a nice rich white man, caught on to them when they were setting up. She and the director woman got into a nice little fight that should have been aired.


#17

Some woman from ETV pestered us at Games Club one weekend. I guess dropping her business card on the table as if I were handling a second-hand Kleenex wasn’t hint enough for her.


#18

my personal hero is the guy from hong kong heading here after the most recent china airlines crash. some cockroach was continuously trailing him through the airport sticking his camera in the poor guys face, so he smacked it repeatedly out where it more appropriately belonged, smashed on the floor. the poor guy had lost his family, and all the cockroach could do was moan “ta wei shenme yao pohai wodo jiqi” that guy should get a community service medal. i have seen some disgusting things here but the “media” take the cake.


#19

[quote=“formosa”]why on earth would that reporter be astonished that you are still in touch with your parents? HUH? Does she think all foreginers who marry Tiawnawese stop contacting their parents? I do not understand this thinking… pls explain a bit more, thanks

F[/quote]

The thinking is that showing affection towards one’s parents is a special Chinese trait, in other words foreigners don’t do that.

A few years back while I worked as a guide in Copenhagen, a young female guest told me that she thought that foreign families were devoid of warmth. People did not look after each other. I asked her what led her to that conclusion. She told me that “everybody” in Taiwan knew that.

Teh funny thing is that my inlaws don’t seem surprised to the fact that we keep close contact to my family.


#20

Thus, too much reporters with not enough too much time on their hands and an audience that just wants to have their hunches verified even if it’s only one person who admits to something.