Doctors Who Smoke

Political correctness has, I assume, utterly destroyed medical school parties throughout British universities? Anyone who has been to a British university will surely remember the Medical School all-smoking all-drinking parties to which everyone else longed to get invited? (cf. for example the tedium of the annual Law Society event)

Thing is of course, all this anti-smoking bollocks has resulted in huge incomes for drug companies peddling smoking cures based on zero science on so-called “passive smoking”. Fine. Work away. I live in China. But the thing to do is predict what will be next. Obviously they can’t ban alcohol, even though there is loads of money to be made from “cures” for alcoholism, and even though there are “passive alcoholics” who suffer greatly from the effects of drinking too much. So what will it be? It has to be something that can be banned on moral grounds, backed up with some pseudo-science. Perhaps they will ban Not Brushing Your Teeth, or saying Shit on TV. Well I suppose for the UK in ten years you just have to look at America now. People are trying to ban “trans-fats” (whatever the fuck they are) in foods, presumably as the result of some meaningless unscientific study funded by a chemical company which stands to make a fortune out of whatever they replace “trans-fats” with.

cleanairquality.blogspot.com/

Agreed, political correctness takes all the fun out of life. When I was in college, it was still pretty much acceptable socially, though technically illegal, to get plastered and drive home drunk. Everyone did it. We had keggers. We hit the bars. We had lots of fun, finally weaving home late at night with happy memories of bacchanalian events. Then a movement gained momentum, sponsored by a combination of spoilsport prudes and the grieving relatives of unfortunate victims of life’s occasional mishaps, to make driving drunk socially unacceptable and to brand those who did as unconscionable assholes rather than the fun-loving happy-go-lucky guys and gals they once were. Alas, times have changed. One can still try to find a friend for lift or perhaps hail a cab, after quaffing a few drinks, but those carefree days of drinking and driving with reckless abandon and no fear of social repercussions are just quaint memories.

I don’t know how overweight he was, but the ‘over’ in the word means he has crossed some imaginary line between ‘normal’ and ‘not normal’, whatever that means. And ‘normal’ probably means ‘healthy’. I don’t think that overweight affects his knowledge (maybe it’s lack of knowledge that leads to overweight?), but I think that overweight, depending on the degree of course, could well make a doctor less capable, in terms of mobility, speed, flexibility, etc. (especially in emergency situations) and any addiction certainly could make a doctor less capable as well. Withdrawal of any kind of drug affects the way someone does things, even if it’s ‘just’ withdrawal from nicotine. Imagine a surgeon in the operation room constantly thinking “boy I need a fag right now” while working on your open body.

I, for sure would like to have a healthy doctor treating me, especially when he’s a surgeon.

This is just pure hubris. “I am morally superior because I don’t smoke. Those who smoke have an addiction. Therefore they are inferior at what they do.” And so on.

Not a single quantifiable shred of evidence to support it of course. Just like the passive smoking lobby. Striding manfully into the 19th Century.

Just to ask:
How is it your business if your doctor smokes?

The opposite of cis-fats.

OK, continue… :slight_smile:

There is a strange romantic tone in your reflection on how political correctness has “taken all the fun out of life”. When you lose someone unexpectedly to a drunk driver’s behavior, I would say that is when the fun is taken out of life. Thank god for MADD and all those political correct people who want to end drunk driving.

[quote=“SuchAFob”]Just to ask:
How is it your business if your doctor smokes?[/quote]

Just the same as it’s your business if your doctor (or dentist/drycleaner/breakfast laoban/etc) chews binglang, comes to work drunk, rides a motorbike with no helmet, wears a Wang Chien Ming shirt, is into pregnant camel porn, or anything else.

That is to say it’s 100% your business. If something about ones doctor makes one feel the doc is incompetent or hypocritical or rude or one just doesn’t like him/her and it makes one feel uncomfortable, then unless there are no alternatives, one should feel free to see someone else instead. No sense paying money to do business with someone who makes you feel uncomfortable. On the other hand, if it doesn’t bother you at all then fine, continue seeing him/her.

To those who say it makes no difference, how about these:

  • Would it matter if your tax advisor was convicted of cheating on his taxes?

  • What if the local govt health inspector had a business that was cited for various health infractions?

  • What about the preacher who’s caught doing meth and having sex with a prostitute?

Are those different? How?

There is a strange romantic tone in your reflection on how political correctness has “taken all the fun out of life”. When you lose someone unexpectedly to a drunk driver’s behavior, I would say that is when the fun is taken out of life. Thank god for MADD and all those political correct people who want to end drunk driving.[/quote]

+1

[quote=“Mother Theresa”][quote=“SuchAFob”]Just to ask:
How is it your business if your doctor smokes?[/quote]

Just the same as it’s your business if your doctor (or dentist/drycleaner/breakfast laoban/etc) chews binglang, comes to work drunk, rides a motorbike with no helmet, wears a Wang Chien Ming shirt, is into pregnant camel porn, or anything else.

That is to say it’s 100% your business. If something about ones doctor makes one feel the doc is incompetent or hypocritical or rude or one just doesn’t like him/her and it makes one feel uncomfortable, then unless there are no alternatives, one should feel free to see someone else instead. No sense paying money to do business with someone who makes you feel uncomfortable. On the other hand, if it doesn’t bother you at all then fine, continue seeing him/her.

To those who say it makes no difference, how about these:

  • Would it matter if your tax advisor was convicted of cheating on his taxes?

  • What if the local govt health inspector had a business that was cited for various health infractions?

  • What about the preacher who’s caught doing meth and having sex with a prostitute?

Are those different? How?[/quote]

Those are different because they all violate the law. A doctor who smokes is doing nothing illegal. Does it really matter that a doctor smokes? Seems petty to me unless he is lecturing you on quitting, in which case he is being hypocritical. However being right and being hypocritical are two different things and can coexist within a person at the same time. In the end, if you don’t like hypocritical doctors don’t visit them.

Would you take advice from a sick doctor? Seems if he can’t take care of himself then how good can he be at taking care of others?

There is a strange romantic tone in your reflection on how political correctness has “taken all the fun out of life”. When you lose someone unexpectedly to a drunk driver’s behavior, I would say that is when the fun is taken out of life. Thank god for MADD and all those political correct people who want to end drunk driving.[/quote]

:bravo: :bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

absolutely!

one of the things i really liked about the UK is that drink driving has been dealt with such strict policies that it’s almost non-existent,
while binge drinking is the norm there,the statistics are very low regarding drunk driving casualties,and that can only be applauded. :bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

I too believe driving drunk is selfish, stupid and dangerous. I was only stating that to make a point about pc-ness, which was being slagged on in the prior post. In response to that poster and the others who’ve slammed PC-ness on this forum before, I’d state that, yes, PC-ness may seem overly prudish and silly and restrictive in some cases. But for the most part so-called PC-ness arises out of a legitimate response to a legitimate problem – as several of you have now emphasized.

Women don’t like being grabbed, being the subject of sexual jokes or comments, or otherwise being sexually harassed in the workplace, so laws, regulations and policies are enacted to prohibit that and eventually some people comment that such policies have gone too far and ridicule them as being an example of how stupid PC-ness can be, overlooking the fact that it’s the result of sound policies in response to a legitimate problem.

Homosexuals don’t like being called f#ggots and being the subject of crude jokes and harassment based on their sexually orientation, so laws, regulations and policies are enacted to prohibit that and eventually some people comment that such policies have gone too far and ridicule them (eg., the “gay” discussion on forumosa) as being an example of how stupid PC-ness can be, overlooking the fact that it’s the result of sound policies in response to a legitimate problem.

People who don’t smoke cigarettes feel it’s not fair that smokers foul up the air in places they would like to visit, causing their hair and clothes to smell, causing them to cough and get irritated eyes, causing them to get cancer even though they don’t smoke, and causing everyone’s insurance premiums to go up, so laws, regulations and policies arae enacted to prohibit that and eventually some people comment that such policies have gone too far and ridicule them as being an example of how stupid PC-ness can be, overlooking the fact that it’s the result of sound policies in response to a legitimate problem.

I understand how the smokers feel. I was wild and crazy when I was younger and enjoyed doing all sorts of dangerous things. I also had an addiction. So I can understand how some feel society has gone too far in telling them they can’t smoke virtually anywhere, must wear a seatbelt, must wear a motorbike helmet, etc, etc. Perhaps society has gotten paternalistic and hyper-protective. But, I guess that’s why people live longer than ever before today. And, if one wants to smoke there are still plenty of places one can do so.

But I see absolutely nothing wrong with a person feeling uncomfortable with a doctor who smokes. The patient is the customer. It’s his/her money, his/her health, and his/her choice. If that doesn’t bother a patient, fine. But if it does, then the patient should feel perfectly comfortable choosing another doctor instead.

Why is it anyone’s business on what grounds someone else chooses his/her doctor?

He might not lecture you about quitting smoking, but he surely has an obligation to lecture you about living a healthy life. And if he can’t live a healthy life himself then he’s not very convincing, and as a result of that not a good doctor.

A doctor who smokes sends a resounding message to his patients that he has his medicine under solid control. He fears not the trifling concerns that beset the lesser doctor. Cancer? Bah! He controls cancer, not the other way around.

HG

Err…to clear something up: I don’t think there is anything immoral about a doctor smoking, or anyone smoking for that matter. I just think it’s a bit strange.