Does 3-Year Bible College Count as Degree?

Hi,

I am helping out a friend that is thinking about teaching English in Taiwan. His education after high school include 3 years at a Bible school, from which he received a diploma.

My question is would an employer at Taiwan have any trouble getting him a work permit and ARC?

Thank you so much for your time.

I think that it would be difficult to get a visa for a Bible school diploma…

If the degree does not state that it is a three-year degree, it should be OK. I’ve seen dodgier degrees than this that have been accepted, but they won’t accept three-year degrees if they know it is a three-year degree.

Someone on a mission from God?

yes, he would like to get involved with local churches if possible.

Please tell your friend to check out what he is planning to do very carefully. It is illegal for him to do church work without the proper permits. If this is what he really wants to do then I would suggest that he go through his church. Depending on his denomination they can give him the support he would require in getting the appropriate permits and finding the work for him, as needed by the churches. If indeed, this is what he feels he is destined to do then there will be a way to do it legally. Honestly, I’m not trying to knock your friends intentions down but it’s important that he be aware that churches here are no longer dependent on foreigners in order to grow and sustain themselves. They are doing quite well on their own! What he might look into is teaching at one of the Bible Colleges or Seminaries here in Taiwan. They often use overseas people (qualified) to teach English for Theology. To find out more about those possibilities he should go through his church.

BTW - your friend would NOT be able to get a work permit for working at a Seminary (or Bible College) here in Taiwan. It must be arranged through his church organization from his home country. They would have to handle all permits, visas etc. This in not a typical ARC thing!

I was under the impression that for a degree to be “valid” from the United States it had to be from an accredited institution; in general, no 3-year degree from a bible college is from an accredited institution.
Of course I could be wrong. :wink:

[quote=“Vannyel”]I was under the impression that for a degree to be “valid” from the United States it had to be from an accredited institution; in general, no 3-year degree from a bible college is from an accredited institution.
Of course I could be wrong. :wink:[/quote]

In New Zealand it probably would be accredited.

For U.S. universities…
utexas.edu/world/univ/
or this link might be more direct
chea.org/institutions/index.cfm

His diploma must be from an accredited institution. I don’t know if his would be accepted. I do know that someone got in with a two-year diploma in drama from a community college. Best to get your friend’s qualifications checked out by your own school, if they’ll do it for you. I got one done through my school for a friend. His was a two year part time diploma in TESOL from a community college. It was turned down. This was all done before my friend left his home country. Hope this helps.

All, or at least most, BA degrees from British universities are three years. It would seem strange if that were an obstical. But studying the bible? If that counts then why not mechanics and plumbers? If he is serious then he should train properly in TEFL.

Bible degrees, or degrees from ‘bible’ schools in the U.S. tend to be for those who either want to preach or just get an ‘easy’ degree. Only a small percentage of these schools are accredited.
And mrwill, they do have ‘vo-tech’ degrees for mechanics and plumbers…but I doubt if you will see them rushing off to Taiwan - they make way too much money in the U.S. :wink:

Yes Vannyel, you are wrong. Its obvious you know nothing about Bible Colleges. Do you know many students learn Greek and another language fluently in the four year time? I somehow do not think you had a traditional education either or you would not say things with no basis whatsoever.

The government of Taiwan maintains a list of accepted institutions. If your friend’s Bible school is not listed the degree will not be accepted. If your friend wants to do free English classes through Bible study, I would not advise trying to go through the employment route to get a visa. Instead, go through a religious organization and get an appropriate visa.

If your friend wants to make money and teach English through the Bible on the side, then he may be able to qualify with the Bible diploma (it it is the equivalent of an Associates degree) and a TESOL certification.

I would suggest that your friend look more carefully into the situation though.

They also learn that

  • Earth was formed in a week
  • Earth is only a few thousand years old
  • Homosexuals, drug users and other sinners will burn in Hell
  • A few billion Buddhists, Muslims, Hindus, Agnostics, Atheists and Pagans will burn in Hell unless we teach them how ignorant they are and convert them to our way of thinking
  • Many books and musical works that are highly-regarded by academics and the general public are in fact evil and should be tossed in piles and lit on fire
  • It is dangerous and inappropriate to think for oneself and to question ones teachers/teachings
  • “Christian music” is actually music

I had a girlfriend whose mother taught at a bible school and sent her daughter there for a semester or two. It was a joke. A degree from a bible school should definitely not qualify as a college degree.

Actually my education was very traditional at an accredited state university. And I know quite a few people who have student languages and are fluent after completing their degrees.
Yes, you are right I know nothing Bible Colleges except that the majority of them are not accredited (this is why I said a small percentage and didn’t say ALL) and a very high percentage of ministers in the U.S. attended Bible Colleges. Based on these two facts I made my statement (obviously meaning I had a basis for saying something).
Either way, hope you have a nice day.

Sadly, I think your friend might be alright . . . but if it was me . . .

Hg

I think going through the church in your friend’s home country is probably his best bet, but I was once offered a missionary visa in Taiwan through Maryknoll, who wanted me to work on their Taiwanese textbooks. So apparently it might be possible to get something like that changed while in Taiwan. But on the other hand, Maryknoll might not have been up on all the details involved with changing a foreigner’s status from work visa to missionary visa.

I don’t think the degree would be accepted as a standard one for purposes of a work permit, though.

[quote=“Mother Theresa”]They also learn that

  • Earth was formed in a week
  • Earth is only a few thousand years old
  • Homosexuals, drug users and other sinners will burn in Hell
  • A few billion Buddhists, Muslims, Hindus, Agnostics, Atheists and Pagans will burn in Hell unless we teach them how ignorant they are and convert them to our way of thinking
  • Many books and musical works that are highly-regarded by academics and the general public are in fact evil and should be tossed in piles and lit on fire
  • It is dangerous and inappropriate to think for oneself and to question ones teachers/teachings
  • “Christian music” is actually music[/quote]
    That’s a very crude statement making a bad stereotype. There are those who believe the above, but that hardly fits most Christians I know.

Some of the most well educated people I have ever met have studied in seminaries or majored in theology. Sure, there are schools issuing diplomas that have laughable curriculum, but there are other schools which have a high standard of education. To lump all such schools together in the same homogenous broad generalizations is disrespectful and sounds uninformed.

Man, they kicked my ass outa Bible college.