Does 3-Year Bible College Count as Degree?

But it probably would pass for one here, and I, for one, think that it should. It’s no more silly than a degree in Philosophy or Feminist Studies.

At worst, matched with a TESOL cert. it would pass throught the system unchallenged.

It is ridiculous to believe that every diploma used in Taiwan is checked with a list of accredited schools. It just doesn’t happen that way. I know of a few people that passed off completely bogus schools as real and got work permits and ARC’s. So, I doubt, unless they’re idiots (I have my doubts), that they will stop a Bible school diploma.

I don’t know about the Bible colleges in the US, but the ones in NZ are offering education of the highest standard. Gee whiz, there’s even one that has one of the leading business schools in the Pacific and is run by a respected entrepeneur / Philanthropist.

Insulting those kinds of institutions is an insult to my intelligence, not that I have much. But what little intelligence that I do have in worthy of some respect.

I knew someone that went to law school. He worked as a bouncer at a club. I thought he was an ass. That doesn’t mean that all people who studied law are the same as him. :idunno:

Just a quick question, Why do you think that a degree in Philosophy is silly. I don’t have one but I think it’s a fairly interesting subject.

I think what should have been said is, “It’s no more silly than basing eligibility to teach English on having a random college degree and having a passport from a country considered to be English-speaking, instead of looking at qualifications, experience and native language.”

But in practical terms, it is a crap shoot. Sometimes they DO check against a list – many times, in fact. And such an institution is unlikely to be accredited and therefore unlikely to be on the list. I don’t think the OP’s question was seeking an affirmation of his educational choice, just an assessment of whether or not it would serve to get a visa. :sunglasses:

Just a quick question, Why do you think that a degree in Philosophy is silly. I don’t have one but I think it’s a fairly interesting subject.[/quote]

Just an example, I wouldn’t want to upset those with a degree in Philosophy.

Hmmm, let us ponder that one for a while.

I don’t know how many jobs a Philosophy degree would be good for. Wait, for that matter, I don’t know how many jobs a bible college degree would be good for either :blush: Hmmmm, let’s see, what have I done again? :blush:

BTW, it worked just fine for me in the past. Your milage may vary.

i’ve gotta side with Mother Theresa on this one…

i can’t give any weight to someone with a degree from an institution with curriculum set by folks like Jerry Falwell and his cronies.

they learn valuable principles like dark skin is evil, your sex organ is best left dormant and god hates gays…they produce many well-oiled hate machines.

[quote=“Hondu Grease”]

they learn valuable principles like dark skin is evil, your sex organ is best left dormant and god hates gays…they produce many well-oiled hate machines.[/quote]

Comments like this are less than constructive, not well founded, and completely lacking in knowledge about the average Bible College. A very unfair and misguided comment that is not reflected in the real world of Bible college… at least from my personal experience.

Such an attack is a sweeping generalisation. It would not be wise to make so many poor informed statements. Yes, I am sure that there are some sicko’s out there, we all know that. That doesn’t make everyone a sicko. Not even close to a majority of bible schools would hold to any of the beliefs that you mention above.

To paint those people as monsters is a great injustice.

I may as well say that ALL English teachers like to mess around with the kiddies. Being that I am an English teacher I know that is NOT true.

This whole thread is waaaaaaaaaaaay off the track of the original posters question and is starting to turn into a nasty hate thread. So, who’s spreading the hate now? :noway:

I thought it was a good example.

one of my acquaintances was a full-time prof at a local university until the MOE changed their stance on his theology degree. mid-semester …

degrees from private taiwan christian colleges are also not recognized by taiwan’s govt.

Having had the misfortune to teach at a private Christian college here in Taiwan, I would have to support the government’s decision here. The majority of the students were idiots; those who weren’t may well have been street smart, but had no interest in academics; the curriculuum was laughably bad; and as far as I could see, the students learned nothing, and wanted to learn nothing. You pay your money, show up for a few classes, and get a Bachelor degree at the end of three or four years.

But that’s not the same as a school in the US. If a school in the US is accredited it will have to meet basic education requirements, plus the field specialization.

On the other hand, if it’s just a diploma offered by the school and not backed by an over-seeing government body then it is probably something similar to your experience here.

The question shouldn’t be about if a degree in theology/Bible studies is legitimate, but whether: 1- The school is accredited in the US and 2- The school is on the MOE’s list of recognized schools.

Having had the misfortune to teach at a private Christian college here in Taiwan, I would have to support the government’s decision here. The majority of the students were idiots; those who weren’t may well have been street smart, but had no interest in academics; the curriculuum was laughably bad; and as far as I could see, the students learned nothing, and wanted to learn nothing. You pay your money, show up for a few classes, and get a Bachelor degree at the end of three or four years.[/quote]

Not to get on the wrong side of the argument, but this description would easily fit a large number of public institutions in Taiwan, and many private, Christian, Buddhist or otherwise.

“Showing up” (usually – there are also organized strategies for cutting class, such as the “class notetaker” and “gong bi” [public notes] system) is the main criterion for passing, and passing (not doing well or mastering anything) is the main criterion for graduation. Not that I didn’t have dedicated and interested students who wanted to learn, but I also had many who would better fit the other category. And the schools I’ve dealt with in many cases seemed much more interested in getting “upgraded” by the MOE by submitting the required paperwork than in actually improving education.

An additional problem with degrees in theology/Bible is that in addition to being practically useless for any real world application – especially the theology side, which is essentially the study of a highly detailed fantasy world – they are favorite choices of bogus degree mills and thus may spark a more detailed check of affairs.

Vorkosigan