Don't Be Chicken

Just cooked my first Poulet Au Gnemboue. Sorry to be pretentious, but that shit ROCKS!

I thought you were a vegetarian?

Aren’t chickens vegetables?! :astonished:

Kind of … Does it have nuts?

I’d like to see that recipe. I didn’t know this dish, but after googling a bit, it reminds me of pollo almendrado.

POULET AU GNEMBOUE

1.5 kg chicken, skinned and cut into portions
1 cup / 125g macadamia or hazelnuts roasted lightly (I used hazelnuts and doubled the amount)
2 cups / 471 ml stock (I needed more than that)
1/2 teaspoon chili powder (I used double)
1 clove garlic, crushed (I used double)
3 spring onions, thinly sliced
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Blend the roasted nuts and a little of the stock into a paste. Add stock as required
  2. Pour the sauce into a large pan and place over a gentle heat. Now add the chili powder, garlic, spring onions
    salt and pepper, mixing with a spoon.
  3. Put in the chicken pieces. Make sure they are coated with the nut sauce. Cover the pot and cook over a very low heat for about 1 hr or until the chicken is cooked. Check often and stir to prevent sticking, adding more water/stock if necessary.

I used fillet chicken breasts and cut them in half. Took half the time. Does require more water/stock than aforementioned, though.

Looks good! And looking at your adjustments, it looks like you have good instincts for cooking.

I did see macademias (not the salted snacking kind) in my local baking DIY shop today in Donghu - I think they were $140 for 200g, so you can try those next time if you like (of course it wouldn’t hurt to use the snacking kind).

That reminds me of this; quite similar, really:

Pollo Almendrado - Mexican Chicken with Almonds
recetasdecocina.com.mx/recet … lmendrado/

* 2 full boneless chicken breasts
* 1 tablespoon lard or vegetable oil
* 1medium onion, roughly chopped
* 1 garlic clove minced
* 1 cup chicken broth
* 1/2 cup   blanched, slivered almonds
* 2 serrano chiles, deseeded (if you want) and chopped
* 1 teaspoon vinegar
* 1/2 teaspoon sugar
* 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Cut chicken breasts in half to have 4 pieces total.  Set aside.

Heat a heavy bottomed skillet large enough to hold chicken in a single layer until hot, but not smoking.  Swirl in oil and add onions. Cook until onions become translucent. Stir in garlic, broth, half the almonds (1/4 cup), chopped chiles, vinegar, sugar and cinnamon. Heat over a high flame to boiling.   When it reaches the boil, immediately turn down heat to maintain a simmer, and cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

Spoon mixture into a blender container, cover and blend on low speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Return sauce to skillet.

Put chicken in the sauce, turning with a tongs so both sides are coated. Cook skin side up in a single layer in the skillet. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 45 - 50 minutes or until chicken is done.

Put chicken on serving platter.  Spoon sauce over top, then garnish sprinkle with remaining slivered almonds.

Serves: 4

[quote=“Dragonbones”]Looks good! And looking at your adjustments, it looks like you have good instincts for cooking.

I did see macademias (not the salted snacking kind) in my local baking DIY shop today in Donghu - I think they were $140 for 200g, so you can try those next time if you like (of course it wouldn’t hurt to use the snacking kind).

That reminds me of this; quite similar, really:

Pollo Almendrado - Mexican Chicken with Almonds
recetasdecocina.com.mx/recet … lmendrado/

* 2 full boneless chicken breasts
* 1 tablespoon lard or vegetable oil
* 1medium onion, roughly chopped
* 1 garlic clove minced
* 1 cup chicken broth
* 1/2 cup   blanched, slivered almonds
* 2 serrano chiles, deseeded (if you want) and chopped
* 1 teaspoon vinegar
* 1/2 teaspoon sugar
* 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Cut chicken breasts in half to have 4 pieces total.  Set aside.

Heat a heavy bottomed skillet large enough to hold chicken in a single layer until hot, but not smoking.  Swirl in oil and add onions. Cook until onions become translucent. Stir in garlic, broth, half the almonds (1/4 cup), chopped chiles, vinegar, sugar and cinnamon. Heat over a high flame to boiling.   When it reaches the boil, immediately turn down heat to maintain a simmer, and cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

Spoon mixture into a blender container, cover and blend on low speed until smooth, about 1 minute. Return sauce to skillet.

Put chicken in the sauce, turning with a tongs so both sides are coated. Cook skin side up in a single layer in the skillet. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, covered, 45 - 50 minutes or until chicken is done.

Put chicken on serving platter.  Spoon sauce over top, then garnish sprinkle with remaining slivered almonds.

Serves: 4[/quote]

Aw man! Now I’m hungry all over again. Guess what I’m eating tomorrow night!

For the serrano you can substitute the long Thai chiles. You sound like a garlic lover (like me) but in this particular recipe (which I’ve not followed in this form, although I’ve made the dish), you will want to restrain the urge to up the garlic; it will clash with the cinnamon. IMHO.

I don’t know much about chillies, but I know that I prefer the milder kind. I shall use my discretion. Agreed about the garlic. Thank you, Sir.

Well, I guess you know to use fewer chiles and remove the seeds, then. :stuck_out_tongue:
(Too bad mild, flavorful varieties of Mexican chiles aren’t available here – there’s so much more than spiciness involved! But you can mail order ancho and pasilla, and play with them.)

i’m kinda shocked about the 2 aforementioned recipes, the chicken is basically boiled/stewed in the gravy,

browning the chicken in the onions before adding the sauce would add the undeniably addictive maillard effect

exploratorium.edu/cooking/me … lavor.html

Cool site!

this one is even more so:

cookingissues.wordpress.com/

weeks worth of reading, some post might be over technical for the casual foodie

on another related note

the “beer can Chicken”

youtube.com/watch?v=envkFOn2AyQ

i was very skeptical about this, but we did a test of cooking 1 with a can and 1 without,and the result is simply stunning!

(no need to prick the can,it’s dangerous and won’t help at all, the steam/beer coming out of the main opening is enough,also, use a 33ml can,the jumbo ones don’t fit inside the chick fully unless you roast an ostrich)

[quote=“dablindfrog”]on another related note

the “beer can Chicken”

youtube.com/watch?v=envkFOn2AyQ
[/quote]
Wow! What a great gimmick at a BBQ! Sounds really tasty too!

Yeah, agreed. I tend to do that with any meat before stewing it, even when it’s not written down in the recipe. Just tastes better!

Made some Gaeng Gari Gai for dinner. Haven’t done much Thai cooking in the past, but was impressed by the result. Substituted bell peppers with mushrooms. Lost a bit of color, but gained some juiciness. Used green curry paste instead of yellow. A tad milder. Guess what jimi’s eating for breakfast?

Not being able to speak Chinese, it’s pretty hard for me to find authentic Thai ingredients. Improvisation is the key. No recipe is cast in stone (apart from my Mum’s).

It’s actually really easy and cheap. Just go to Burma town at Nanshijiao and you can find almost anything you could possibly want for very cheap.

Made some most excellent OSTRICH FETA BURGERS last night.

675g ostrich mince (had ostrich steaks, minced them myself)
75g feta cheese
2 tbsp black olives, finely chopped
1 teasp dried origano
1 teasp dried thyme (I used a bit less)
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tbsp olive oil
salt and black pepper

Blend all the ingredients together with your hands and make patties (4).

Fry/grill/BBQ (I fried)

Put on bread rolls with lettuce, tomato, pickles, sauces (whatever you like on a burger).

Mango & chili salsa as accompaniment. :lick: