Drill Baby Drill: Nothing succeeds like success


#41

[quote]Massive hyperinflation!! Plunging US dollar!! Collapsing stockmarkets!! Trillion-dollar deficits as far as the eye can see!! Calamitous unemployment (not that they actually care)!! Exploding national debt!! Soaring interest rates as bond markets reject Obama policies!! Buy GOLDDD!!!

OBAMA IS DESTROYING America!!! :fume: :astonished: :fume: :astonished: :fume: :astonished: ( a little fred smith there)

OH, wait- none of that happened? Everything we have continuously, hysterically been predicting for the last six years was totally wrong? Everything the other guys said was right?[/quote]

I think that you meant to post this in the climate change thread, no? :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: (a little more Fred Smith here)!


#42

[quote=“fred smith”]

I think that you meant to post this in the climate change thread, no? :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: (a little more Fred Smith here)![/quote]

Yep, he should have- that absolutely describes how climate-change deniers act- maybe he can just cc it.


#43

All the depressing stuff. I need to post some good news. Here goes:

money.cnn.com/2016/03/01/investi … cord-opec/

[quote]rices did drop, even more than OPEC members were prepared for. Oil touched $26 a barrel last month, down 75% from its mid-2014 peak.

However, OPEC’s strategy has failed to kill off the U.S. oil boom. At least so far. Despite the drop in prices, domestic production rose 8% last year and is now up 45% since 2012.

Strong U.S. output has been fueled by a wave of innovation that has improved companies’ productivity and efficiency. The oil companies have also benefited from lower service costs due to the downturn.

“Shale production has been more resilient than anyone thought it could be,” said Brian Youngberg, senior energy analyst at Edward Jones. “Companies are investing in their core assets where they can get the biggest bang for their buck.” [/quote]

As good as I’d hoped for geopolitics and for consumers, and less bad than I feared for the US oil industry.

As for the long-suffering Venezuelans, their lack of toilet paper is not directly related to oil prices. It’s because when the oil money was flowing in, their government up and stole it all, and now they’ve stolen the toilet paper too. Serves the people right for not throwing the bums out when they had the chance. They’re getting what they voted for good and hard. It’s called poetic social justice.


#44

Why nations like Venezuela and Argentina and Brazil and Greece and Italy and Portugal and Spain and (fill in the blank) need to go through these lessons OVER AND OVER AGAIN is a mystery to me. But the Santana was Spanish, no? BUT when intelligent (we hope) observers fail to see the link between everything is free and productivity and eventual bankruptcy one really has to wonder how and why so many “educated” youth have this passion for Bernie Sanders. Nous sommes tous Venezueliens?


#45

Why nations like Venezuela and Argentina and Brazil and Greece and Italy and Portugal and Spain and (fill in the blank) need to go through these lessons OVER AND OVER AGAIN is a mystery to me. But the Santana was Spanish, no? BUT when intelligent (we hope) observers fail to see the link between everything is free and productivity and eventual bankruptcy one really has to wonder how and why so many “educated” youth have this passion for Bernie Sanders. Nous sommes tous Venezueliens?[/quote]

Wow, comparing the United States and Americans to Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Greece, etc? Didn’t you forget Zimbabwe and the Weimar republic? Forget being sick that day, were you sick for the entire 10 or so years we learned about those countries in school? How did you go from the problems in those countries to Americans and voters of Bernie Sanders? Dude, make sure you’ve checked the organ donation box. Science needs to get a closer look at that thing between your ears. :laughing:

Good management means you’re more insulated from price shocks. The rest of the oil producing world just underestimated the efficiency of American companies and they picked the wrong country to have a price war with. OPEC countries are so wildly inefficient they just didn’t realize what they were getting into. Profit flows to the elites at the top so they never have to manage anything efficiently, but good old American resilience proved a worthy opponent. This oil rally could be short lived, but I think the American oil industry will be ok all the way down to 20$ if it goes there.


#46

LOL is right. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck… maybe it really is a duck? Cue whimpering about how communism (er socialism, no make that social democracy) has never actually been implemented and so the multiple failures need to be understood in the context of x, y or z… Z is right. zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

[quote]
Good management means you’re more insulated from price shocks. The rest of the oil producing world just underestimated the efficiency of American companies and they picked the wrong country to have a price war with. OPEC countries are so wildly inefficient they just didn’t realize what they were getting into. Profit flows to the elites at the top so they never have to manage anything efficiently, but good old American resilience proved a worthy opponent. This oil rally could be short lived, but I think the American oil industry will be ok all the way down to 20$ if it goes there.[/quote]

One imagines that one remembers various posters and their echo chambers as LOUDLY agreeing that we were at peak oil and price rises and cue: end of the world unless we convert to green energy/technology… etc… etc… etc… polar bears… glaciers… snow a thing of the past… record heat… record cold… record boring… back to Z. Yes, Z! zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


#47

Well the concept of peak oil was always ridiculous, but why does that have anything to do with the very real and measurable concern of AGW? It’s quite easy to laugh at peak oil and take climate change seriously.


#48

Great. We agree!


#49

Another victory for the economy, against Il Douche and the terror nations:

wsj.com/articles/judge-strik … 1466600116


#50

Without the fracking, we would not have had the supply to lead to the oil price drops that have done so much to weaken those with whom we have major strategic differences: Russia (Ukraine), Venezuela (mindless populist revolution of THIS decade), Saudi Arabia (Wahhabi extremist funding), Iran (expansionist policies).


#51

[quote=“BrentGolf”]
Well the concept of peak oil was always ridiculous, but why does that have anything to do with the very real and measurable concern of AGW? It’s quite easy to laugh at peak oil and take climate change seriously.[/quote]

Your hindsight is clearer than your foresight.

Ten years from now, it may well be:

“Well the concept of AGW was always ridiculous, but why does that have anything to do with the very real and measurable concern of…”


#52

The only thing that can keep us from shutting down this source of terror is the global warming fanatics and scammers…

irishtimes.com/business/ener … -1.2710420

[quote]The US holds more oil reserves than Saudi Arabia and Russia, the first time it has surpassed those held by the world’s biggest exporting nations, according to a new study.

Rystad Energy estimates recoverable oil in the US from existing fields, discoveries and yet undiscovered areas amounts to 264 billion barrels. The figure surpasses Saudi Arabia’s 212 billion and Russia’s 256 billion in reserves.

The analysis of 60,000 fields worldwide, conducted over a three-year period by the Oslo-based group, shows total global oil reserves at 2.1 trillion barrels. This is 70 times the current production rate of about 30 billion barrels of crude oil a year, Rystad Energy said yesterday.
[/quote]


#53

and if it had been up to the envirofascists, we would be over a barrel right now but despite all the protests and efforts to block these important discoveries-endeavors we are now sitting pretty vis a vis nations like Venežuela, Russia, Saudi Arabia because the EXACT OPPOSITE policies were enacted. Here is to resurrecting Keystone soon.


#54

No thanks. We already got oil.

This is the good side of globalism. In conjunction with fracking, it starves the Saudi regime which funds ISIS. Unfortunately, globalism also lets suicide bombers in.


#55

More oil in Texas:

The good news is that peak oil has been delayed yet again. The other good news is this further weakens the state supporters of international terrorism. The other other good news is that oil will continue to shore up the US economy.

The bad news is that He Who Shall Not Be Blamed will no longer be in a position to take the credit. Instead, The Donald will bask in the prosperity.

Oh, and if you believe in anthropogenic global warming, or are heavily invested in alternative energy, well… find somebody to hug.


#56

You seem to fundamentally misunderstand what ‘peak oil’ is. ‘Peak’ refers to pricing, ie., economic inefficiency, not physical runout. Solar thermal is now more economically efficient than fossil fuels in all moderate-temperature applications, and has been for about 10 years. Solar PV is more efficient in some applications, and at approximate parity in several others. About the only application that still needs fossil fuels (for energy-density reasons) is aviation.

Of course, if you ‘believe in’ fossil fuels, hard numbers don’t mean anything to you.

Why does it? The US will continue to buy oil from sponsors of terrorism, and probably supply them with arms (or license the designs to them).

Sure, if you believe that selling off your capital at below market value is the same thing as making profits.


#57

You didn’t build that, Il Douche…


#58

Shale oil helped immensely, if not the only reason.
Its huge rise in output over the last decade is so obvious.


#59

I thought that was a joke headline at first. God, what a tool.


#60

LOL. Obama was out there in the desert setting up oil pipelines and drilling holes, was he?

Not the first time I’ve heard that sort of thing (although usually not so bluntly). Absolutely astounding level of arrogance from the suits who do nothing except impose taxes on the guys doing the hard work on the ground. If that’s what they call “helping”, then I wouldn’t like to be on the receiving end of deliberate hindrance.