Driving laws

My state has reciprocity with Taiwan, so I’m planning on getting my license.

I just want to know if the traffic laws are more or less the same as in the us? Is there anything I should know before I start driving? I see those scooters whizzing in and out of traffic all the time and people doing funky things at red lights (turning left on red for example).

If I’m a cautious driver will that end up being more dangerous (people seem like pretty reckless drivers here). I guess I just feel a bit nervous driving in a different country.

But I really need a car since my university is all the way in muzha and I live in danhai

laws are more or less the same. adherence to the law, and enforcement are not…
with traffic im not sure it will be a pleasant drive, you are basically crossing Taipei north to south.
I would suggest a scooter / taxi to get you to the mrt and back. will probably be cheaper than owning a car

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No right-turn on red in Taiwan. And from what I’ve heard it’s better not to move the car in case of an accident (I think that’s pretty much the opposite from the US).

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Cheaper, maybe but I’ve looked at every route I can think of and there’s no way to do it in less than 2 hours from my apartment.

Maybe taxi. I’ll keep exploring bus routes.

its either a combination of Red+Brown line (and then you need taxi or short bus ride to get from the zoo to NCCU) , or Red+Green line, and then take a taxi from wanlong (which is longer).
you can rent a car and see how long the drive takes you, and if it saves you enough time.

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MRT would be my best option, Driving across Taipei during peek times can be very stressful.

FTFY

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It really depends where you are going and whether you find a good way to drive there. If you get to know the streets a bit, it is sometimes possible to get places fast, even in peak times. Some places are hard to get to at all times because traffic gets bottle-necked at the same spots. I have driven to work and loved driving within Taipei at busy times. Other places I dislike driving to at peak times and I would say are very prone to accidents. Another key question is, do you have (cheap) parking at your home, and at the destination.

One important rule to re-remember is “do not change lanes without looking over your shoulders (plus mirrors of course)”. I think not doing so is one of the biggest causes of accidents. Then the second thing I recommend is when changing lanes, do everything slowly. If you put on your direction indicator ahead of time and wait a few seconds and then gradually start crossing the lane scooters can expect your movement and will make way, although they may honk if they think they should go first, but at least they won’t get surprised by your movements.

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While doing this keep an eye on the car behind who may try to steal your spot, and any cars in the other lane that may speed up as to not let you in front of them and if there is a 3rd lane try to make sure there is nothing coming up behind that will use that gap to undertake another car.

Don’t get me wrong there are countries worse / better than here, you need to think about how you want to start and end your days work/study, there are lots of ways to take the edge of your commute. You have the normal, audio books, podcast etc, going to the gym in the morning or evening, stopping for a coffee or a meal, use the time to get ahead with a little work/ planning. It’s always a good excuse to stop for a beer on the way home.

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So you think 4 hour commute round trip is worth it to avoid driving?

Like I said, I am nervous about driving. But I’m also not Enthusiastic about sitting on a bus for so long (although I do like listening toy audiobooks).

I guess I’ll think about what people have said here.

Thanks for all the input guys! I appreciate it

Tell us again from where to where? I see somebody saying you can take MRT, but I do not see where you said what trip you will be planning to make exactly.

I use to drive up to a 4 hour round trip commute before I moved to Taiwan, public transport wasn’t an option.

If I’m honest with you whichever option you choose, there will be days when you wished you had the other option. If I was in your situation, have the means and location to keep a car. I would get the car anyway (and scooter) as they have other uses not just commuting.

The difference between public transport and driving at the time you need to be there, may not be that big (try an uber a few days to see the times and note the route they take). If you’re worried about driving don’t just start by doing your commute, take a few weeks to build yourself up to it.

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its here

Actually this is great advice. Sometimes, take the car. Other times hop on the MRT and stop by somewhere in the city for errands if you please.

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Why would you live in Danhai and go to Uni in Muzha?

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You can be fined if you horn more than once and more than 2 secs. You can be fined if you show your middle finger . If there’s an accident where IS NOT YOUR FAULT…but if you throw a punch…even if you received first…Law will not care who fault is.

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I can confirm this from experience.

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I was going to say I would just move or get a room, but I assume there is some reason that can’t happen hence the commute.

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I’ve done Danhai to Jianguo N Rd. But that extra bit to Muzha and then to Zhengda? That’s a killer.

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You can undertake. I don’t know if that’s allowed in the US?