Egypt deeply divided and heading for Military rule

It looks like Egypt is headed for more uncertainty. Military have given the two sides 48 Hours to fix things or they will step in.Morsy is probably going to have to step down. The Opposition are refusing talks with him.

Another example why America should mind their own business when it come to the middle east and let the godforsaken place rot from within via its own volition

Nice try, but this ain’t 1948.
We, and by that I mean, N.America, are far too embedded for that.
Payback is a mutha…

MMM ,perhaps it should have been called the “Arab Climate Change”,instead of “spring”. Everyone knows it’s changing,but nobody knows exactly what will happen in the end.

I’m sure it’s a lot more complex situation that we can imagine. It’s like they’ve opened up the democracy tin and still don’t know what to do with it.
I hope they don’t end up fighting each other to death because Egypt is one of the better countries in the Arab world. Supposedly lots of Morsi voters don’t want him now just a year later.

Morsi did say that he was the elected president, which is also true. The problem I see, as an outsider, is that as soon S these new presidents get in power that want to change the constitution to suit them and their power bloc (even if they have 50% of the vote). They should leave that alone and get on with running the country and stop forcing their views on others. They started banning alcohol already as if that was something important to focus on compared to all their other problems.

I think I’d rather see the military in control in Egypt than the Muslims.

Maybe I am looking at this too simply, but then again I am not very bright.

WTF did they expect from an Islamist President, representing an Islamist party?

No wonder Murabak was in power for so long. In fact they should kick him outta bed an put him back on the job

Maybe I am looking at this too simply, but then again I am not very bright.

WTF did they expect from an Islamist President, representing an Islamist party?

No wonder Murabak was in power for so long. In fact they should kick him outta bed an put him back on the job[/quote]
Egypt would have no problem ,if this young man was in charge. I thought he was brainwashed by someone,initially,but not when you watch the whole video. Refreshing to see an Egyptian with Common sense,wanting the best for his Country…

The military should not possess the power to remove a sitting president who was democratically elected. But then again, looking at how quickly elected leaders drop in the polls around the world these days, I think maybe people today are getting too impatient for democracy and it’s likely because of the spread of information and improved ability to communicate with one another. It’s like sudden-onset buyer’s remorse, but with the leader of your county. I’m interested to see what this means for democracy as a system down the line.

Maybe I am looking at this too simply, but then again I am not very bright.

WTF did they expect from an Islamist President, representing an Islamist party?

No wonder Murabak was in power for so long. In fact they should kick him outta bed an put him back on the job[/quote]
Egypt would have no problem ,if this young man was in charge. I thought he was brainwashed by someone,initially,but not when you watch the whole video. Refreshing to see an Egyptian with Common sense,wanting the best for his Country…

[/quote]

This kid is amazingly smart if he figured all this out by himself. It’s very impressive.

The problem in a democratic theocracy, is that their religion tells them WE are right and EVERYBODY else is wrong, so you must get THEM (the apostates…the wrong minded) to follow you whether they like it or not. They therefore went straight ahead to change the constitution in their favour with religion being stronger than law. Even if you have 50% or 60% of the people willing to go along with that you wont have a functioning country without including the remaining 50% or 40% or even 30%!

Actually something similar although less obvious happened with CSB’s regime. His biggest mistake was not to bring along the people who did not support him. If he and the DPP has tried to bring the other minorities or people on the fence, they could well still be in power now.

Egypt has more fundamental problems underneath which is causing all this to kick-off and be magnified an enormously expanded population heavily weighted to youth with few economic prospects and large glaring inequalities. Taiwan’s political strifes have been quitened by a population that is rapidly aging and an economy that while, not good, is sufficient to provide jobs for all that want one.

A democratic theocracy. Now I am really confused???
And I swear, I am only dalf hrunk!!!

[quote=“bigduke6”]A democratic theocracy. Now I am really confused???
And I swear, I am only dalf hrunk!!![/quote]

Got a better word for it?

The problem in a democratic theocracy, is that their religion tells them WE are right and EVERYBODY else is wrong, so you must get THEM (the apostates…the wrong minded) to follow you whether they like it or not. [/quote]

I thought that was the problem with religion.

Not all religions are the same, in Taiwan most religions dont try telling people who don’t believe in their beliefs to follow them.
We know Islam is different in this regards.

[quote=“headhonchoII”]Not all religions are the same, in Taiwan most religions dont try telling people who don’t believe in their beliefs to follow them.
We know Islam is different in this regards.[/quote]

Sorry, I should have specifies monotheistic religions.

Couple of articles, one in the NYT and one in the WSJ, suggesting that this whole thing was a lot less spontaneous than thought:

[quote] In the months before the military ousted President Mohammed Morsi, Egypt’s top generals met regularly with opposition leaders, often at the Navy Officers’ Club nestled on the Nile.

The message: If the opposition could put enough protesters in the streets, the military would step in—and forcibly remove the president.

Since Mr. Mubarak’s ouster, Egypt’s activists have proved woeful at grass roots organizing outside cities. But in late April a previously little-known group, Tamarod, separately launched a petition against Mr. Morsi.

Tamarod’s effort took off. Its founders claim they gathered 22 million signatures in less than eight weeks. The numbers are impossible to verify, but were widely reported as fact by state and private media, two hotbeds of anti-Muslim Brotherhood zeal.

In the town of Zagazig, former Mubarak party lawmaker Lotfy Shehata said he rallied support for Tamarod using the same political networks that got him elected under Mr. Mubarak.
[/quote]

online.wsj.com/article_email/SB1 … ttop_email

[quote] Mr. Sawiris, one of Egypt’s richest men and a titan of the old establishment, said Wednesday that he had supported an upstart group called “tamarrod,” Arabic for “rebellion,” that led a petition drive seeking Mr. Morsi’s ouster. He donated use of the nationwide offices and infrastructure of the political party he built, the Free Egyptians. He provided publicity through a popular television network he founded and his major interest in Egypt’s largest private newspaper. He even commissioned the production of a popular music video that played heavily on the network.

“Tamarrod did not even know it was me!” he said. “I am not ashamed of it.”
[/quote]

nytimes.com/2013/07/11/world … anted=all&

There were businessman who had flourished under the corruption of the Mubarak regime; the cronyism which had stacked the civil service, especially the police, with Mubarak-era supporters; and the military, realising how unpopular they were, and using the liberal reformers as fronts.

[quote=“MikeN”]Couple of articles, one in the NYT and one in the WSJ, suggesting that this whole thing was a lot less spontaneous than thought. . . .


There were businessman who had flourished under the corruption of the Mubarak regime; the cronyism which had stacked the civil service, especially the police, with Mubarak-era supporters; and the military, realising how unpopular they were, and using the liberal reformers as fronts.[/quote]

It does look very peculiar. This is from June of last year, when the Mubarak-appointed Supreme Constitutional Court dissolved the newly-elected Parliament:

[quote]A panel of judges appointed by Egypt’s ousted president, Hosni Mubarak, threw the nation’s troubled transition to democracy into grave doubt Thursday with rulings that dissolved the popularly elected Parliament and allowed the toppled government’s last prime minister to run for president, escalating [color=#000080]a struggle by remnants of the old elite to block Islamists from coming to power[/color].


The rulings recalled [color=#000080]events that have played out across the region for decades, when secular elites have cracked down on Islamists poised for electoral gains[/color], most famously when the dissolution of Algeria’s Islamist-led Parliament started a civil war 20 years ago.


Many analysts and activists said Thursday that they feared the decision was [color=#000080]a step toward re-establishing a military-backed autocracy[/color]. . . .[/quote]–David D. Kirkpatrick, “Blow to Transition as Court Dissolves Egypt’s Parliament,” New York Times, June 14, 2012

I’m not a fan of the Muslim Brotherhood, but using the army to nullify undesirable election outcomes doesn’t sound like a good way to preserve democracy.

The whole thing is very sad. Poor Egypt!