Eight-mile wall of prehistoric paintings of animals and humans is discovered

I missed this, looks pretty amazing. Will have to watch this

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Pretty cool. So, its a good thing we are burning down the forests and discovering long lost ruins hehe.

Soy +1

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i saw a chicken

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I had to look up camelid after seeing a couple of typos in there. Yurp. It’s a thing.

I like this kind of stuff. In the book Sapiens, whatshisface says that if we could go back in time to when the paint was wet, we could learn their language, and they could learn ours. We haven’t changed all that much.

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evidence for pre-Columbian contact?

Gavin Menzies says yes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gavin_Menzies#1421:_The_Year_China_Discovered_The_World

By 1421, Polynesians were already planting and eating Kumura in New Zealand. The Ming navigators would have to hold the Polynesian’s beer.

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Because Sapiens were us, Cro Magnon man. We haven’t changed at all.
Even the Neandethals were us…partly…and we could almost certainly speak each other’s languages too.

I’m guessing the giant sloth was the thing with two fingered claws. Those things were the size of a car.

20210111_110200 20210111_110134

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There is also the sweet potato. Anyway we know that it was some kind of very early contact across the pacific but it’s likely to far predate Chinese explorers.

Edit - new info about the sweet potato

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-04488-4#:~:text=The%20unassuming%20sweet%20potato%20(Ipomoea,by%20at%20least%20100%2C000%20years.

new contradictory information, is it not?

Its a complex picture, that’s new info I didn’t know before so I added it.

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The conclusion can only be drawn as the 1769 sample of sweet potato in South Pacific diverged from the branch of modern sweet potato at least 100,000 years ago.

It doesn’t implicate that particular sweet potato has been in the South Pacific for over 100,000 years. They could have split for that long in the Americas, and just one was brought over by people into the South Pacific in the 10th century.

It also doesn’t explain why linguistically kūmara in Polynesia seems to be a loan from South American languages.

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That’s why I said complex. We obviously need to look at the genetics of the cultivated sweet potato first, and the linghistics too.

Yurp. When Sapiens invaded Oz, there were 2000 pound wombats running around. Those were the days!

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Plenty of North American “megafauna” as well!

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I assume when we perfect time travel, that’s where we’ll go to hunt the big ones.

See, that’s why they’re all gone! Bring some McDonald’s and leave the animals alone.

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Let’s not forget paraceratherium transouralicum that roamed much of Asia. It was the largest terrestrial mammal ever lived.

I’m gonna need a bigger wall mount.

You know why they’re gone. Group spear hunt one or two a month for a thousand years. How about time travel and JOIN a group…BYOS.

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Any precinct in England is packed full of megafauna grazing. They often have strange patterns on their skin.

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