English Teachers' Association Conference and Book Fair

The annual ETA conference and book fair is next Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

http://www.eta.org.tw/eta/15th_english/INDEX.HTM

Any presentations that shouldn’t be missed?
Worth going this year?

In my opinion, no. I got my flier in the mail a while back and the presentations looked like shite. Nothing that caught my eye. No workshops or even trade book presentations that looked interesting. I’m giving it a wide miss this year. Unless they’ve added more presentations, it doesn’t seem like it’ll be worth the money to attend, greasy biendan and all.

I was told by the ETA that it is free to enter the booth area where there are around 100,

but the presentations are something that you have to pay for, I believe it is $1,500 for the weekend.

The $1500 also goes for an annual membership which is nice to have if you are serious about teaching English, but other than that, the lectures this year didn’t look that interesting… of course, I remember last year that the lectures which were good, we often overcrowded with people sitting in all of the aisles and a bunch straining their necks at the doors to see over each other. And then there were those which sounded interesting, but were basically a person reading their research paper verbatim with the paper on the overhead and in hand (and in the book, just in case you still weren’t following along). The funny thing is that most of the lectures are in Chinese. Goes to show what the professional ELT atmosphere is like in Taiwan… :unamused:

There were hardly any BIG name speakers either this year. Compared to other Asian conferences I’ve been to, it’s got more ‘buzz’, but there is definitely a distort between what people there say, and what the rest of the teaching profession does.

BTW, I didn’t go.

Years ago when I presented there, I did my paper in Chinese and presented in Chinese. I was concerned that some folks would not be able to follow an English lecture on the topic I was discussing.

I see. It certainly makes sense in a country where a great number of English schools are run by people who can’t speak a lick of English.