EVA TV ad "I see dead people"

EVA Airlines has a new ad out on CNN being aired here in Thailand. It’s pretty nonsensical and it doesn’t translate any better. This link has a longer version of the one being broadcast here. The version here is edited down to, as I recall, “I see the world; I see people; I see you…Change the way you see the world…“E” “V” “A” Air.”

http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7nvL/eva-air-fly-high-see-more

Aside from the meaninglessness of this ad and the fact that the person in the spot and narrating is a heavily accented Japanese (Did EVA relocate to Japan?), did any of the people who created the ad ask anyone what their impressions might be?
For me, the next line after I hear, “I see the world; I see people; I see you,” naturally is, “I see dead people,” as in the movie The Sixth Sense. What a marvelous image to advertise for an airlines…
Nice to see the Taiwanese have not lost their touch…

EVA Airline
Marketing
Fail

If " I see You" is the new corporate tag-line, they got no clue about travelers agenda’s.

Lucky they did not considered using a Hello Kitty painted plane in the clip :neutral:

I think of the Film “Avatar”,when I hear,“I see you”. :popcorn:

It’s typical corporate fluff but I wouldn’t make the dead connection. I think more “I see a little silhouette of a man. Scaramouche, Scaramouche…etc.”

In any case, it’s not exactly up there with the Got Milk campaigns in Mexico where Con Leche? implies “are you lactating?” :laughing:

Folks, we are dealing with a company here that took the perfectly serviceably named “Evergreen Club” (admittedly a lousy frequent flier point scheme) and just renamed it… “Infinity MileageLands” (yes there is no space between “Mileage” and “Lands”). Completely ridiculous.

Guy

It looks ridiculous to me too, but I just showed this to my gf and she said its actually a massively popular campaign here due to the hunk status of the half-jap half-tai star. Apparently, people are plastering it all over FB and even posing beside the ad billboard at the Taoyuan airport for photos.

[quote=“afterspivak”]Folks, we are dealing with a company here that took the perfectly serviceably named “Evergreen Club” (admittedly a lousy frequent flier point scheme) and just renamed it… “Infinity MileageLands” (yes there is no space between “Mileage” and “Lands”). Completely ridiculous.

Guy[/quote]

But…but…our new marketing director has an 1 year M.A. from Birmingham Tech Uni…she can do the work herself…and it shows. :slight_smile:

I made that up, but from the results we can guess the causes.

Actually I can see why it would be popular with Taiwanese and Japanese (random English words with simple syntax is perfect for them), but if they are reaching out beyond that, then yes, fail.

This ad campaign wasn’t some hammy in-house production by EVA - it was the brainchild of an international ad agency.

batesasia.com/our_work.html

It would seem that Takeshi Kaneshiro’s “shuai-ness” is all that is required to sell a product in Taiwan.

Obviously the ad was designed to appeal to Taiwanese (and it does) but fails miserably to make an impression on non-Chinese. Why the ad agency didn’t anticipate this is anybody’s guess.

They likely did, but my experience suggests that the Taiwanese company just didn’t get it.

One example: A friend is a translator and had to translate a company history. He translated “warring states period” into “a time of great struggle.” The boss wanted a literal translation and wouldn’t accept that westerners for the most part wouldn’t have a clue what “warring states” meant.

One of the scenes in the ad depicts the actor earning trust from a deer. This seems profound to a Taiwanese because the deer is “wild”, i.e. it is free to roam and not chained to a concrete block.

But in actual fact those deer are in a temple park in Nara and are used to hordes of Asian tourists pawing them. There are even vending machines for “deer biscuits” there!

So all Takeshi Kaneshiro had to do to “earn the trust” of the deer was to hold out a deer biscuit.

But for Westerners a wild deer is a forest animal that would flee at the mere scent of a human a kilometer away.

Obviously, to us, the scene is almost comical, but to a Taiwanese Takeshi Kaneshiro is almost godlike in his ability control animals.

And he’s so handsome! :unamused:

Come on dude, the Japanese didn’t give us Bambi. That nonsense is well entrenched in the west too.

Tell that to the deer in my parents’ backyard in Vancouver, or all over Kimberley in the Rockies, or really anywhere across North America these days.

The scent of human means nothing to them (that’s a best-case scenario; more often it means food). Now, if we could get the mountain lions back everywhere, that’d make the deer a bit more careful! Our house cat used to try, really he did, but somehow he wasn’t quite as intimidating.

[quote=“Mucha Man”]It’s typical corporate fluff but I wouldn’t make the dead connection. I think more “I see a little silhouette of a man. Scaramouche, Scaramouche…etc.”

:[/quote]
Thankyou MM. I will be humming this for days. :doh:

The ad is not about what the actor is saying but about the viewer projecting themself to be the actor as a romantic handsome hero (bf for girls/self for man), queue stereotypes of Paris, country scenes, cute animals, nice clothes. The language is really peripheral to this. In the West this would be ironic advertising, but in Asia this is simply aspirational. The only thing they don’t have is his gf turning up and her handing her LV for him to carry and them walking down the Champes D’Elysses hand in hand. Just perfect.

The ad is a success for Asian viewers and completely lost on others.

I very much like the analysis you provided HHII. Taken on its own terms, the ad is in my view impressive–much more so than the idiotic renaming of EVA’s mileage plan which I mocked above. Which helps explain why people would take photos next to billboards featuring Kaneshiro Takeshi–but not next to “Infinity MileageLands” signs if such things actually existed!

But I do wonder about this point:

I think the ad agency knew exactly what it was doing by not presenting this image: it would close off room for viewer fantasizing by making the story too definite, too heterosexual. Do not underestimate the market for LGBT tourism in Taiwan! It’s evident all over Taipei where people are clearly having a very good time. EVA could and should try to get a piece of the pie. :2cents:

Guy

[quote=“monkey”]One of the scenes in the ad depicts the actor earning trust from a deer. This seems profound to a Taiwanese because the deer is “wild”, i.e. it is free to roam and not chained to a concrete block.

But in actual fact those deer are in a temple park in Nara and are used to hordes of Asian tourists pawing them. There are even vending machines for “deer biscuits” there!

So all Takeshi Kaneshiro had to do to “earn the trust” of the deer was to hold out a deer biscuit.

But for Westerners a wild deer is a forest animal that would flee at the mere scent of a human a kilometer away.

Obviously, to us, the scene is almost comical, but to a Taiwanese Takeshi Kaneshiro is almost godlike in his ability control animals.

And he’s so handsome! :unamused:[/quote]

Do NOT underestimate the power of a biscuit ! My then GF had been seduced while in college by a college guy coming over and offering her a biscuit !

Charm, and a biscuit works.

They likely did, but my experience suggests that the Taiwanese company just didn’t get it.

One example: A friend is a translator and had to translate a company history. He translated “warring states period” into “a time of great struggle.” The boss wanted a literal translation and wouldn’t accept that westerners for the most part wouldn’t have a clue what “warring states” meant.[/quote]

Indeed,I see this interpretation ,in Taiwan. A Racewear Company asked for my help with their Catalogue,recently. They wanted the Tagline,“Keeping your Loved ones safe”. Difficult to explain that the actual “Buyers”, are the Racers themselves,not the “loved ones”.People who race cars are ,generally ,not very concerned about how dangerous the Sport is perceived by their Family.
Taiwan can be such a contradiction ,for example The Typhoon left many branches/debris in Taichung. This morning,they are already clearing up…super efficient. The Lady carrying a huge ,fallen Branch,proceeded to drag it past a new looking Jaguar,obviously scratching it . :popcorn:

You guys are killing me. Seriously.

Wolf, glad to have you back. That ad you linked to has been cut and the scenes put out of order. The original full length feature ad had the dialogue that told a story that makes more sense. The idea was a well traveled man kind of linking the image of his travels with his opinion of Eva Air. I thought you guys referred to the “dead people” as the kaleidoscope of people of different ethnicity shown in the original ad -which I see is missing from this one.

I would have loved if the ad had made more references to Taiwan, but we know that internationally that is a no-no. Anyways, we know marketing here limits itself to Asians or Overseas Compatriots, whether it is computers, cellphones, clothing even air tickets. Few ones have strayed from this comfort zone and succeeded.

Disclaimer: as long it is Takeshi Kaneshiro, I could care less the man was selling pinglan. From the FB comments of fans from many countries, they love the ad because of him. So at least they sold the guy. This ad also showed in Times Square and is on rotation on CNN. Oh well, there is your 30 million.