Fake degree VS kindy teaching: which is riskier

Curious about the current state of things. It seems things are becoming more legit, but how popular and risky are the more illegal side of things.

Is one’s odds of getting deported higher if they were to get a kindy job? a fake degree?

is the common punishment for a fake degree higher than kindy teaching?

[quote=“fluffycloud”]Curious about the current state of things. It seems things are becoming more legit, but how popular and risky are the more illegal side of things.

Is one’s odds of getting deported higher if they were to get a kindy job? a fake degree?

is the common punishment for a fake degree higher than kindy teaching?[/quote]

Document forgery is a crime.
Working in a kindergarten is a violation of your visa conditions ( a civil violation) at best.

I was thinking about doing the first one myself when I was replaced by some teacher holding a fake degree which I could not offer in order take over a full-time position.
I can’t prove that his/her degree was fake, but the lack of knowledge was too obvious.

I don’t know the answers to your questions. But in response to the title of your thread, I’d say the fake degree is more risky. If you didn’t put the work in to get a degree chances are the kinky curriculum will be way over your head. Nothing more embarrassing than misspelling kinky vocab on the white board in front of a room full of 5 yr-olds. Been there, done that

REALLY?

A blind, retarded, mute monkey could teach English in Taiwan. As long as said monkey was white.

[quote=“Hamletintaiwan”][quote=“fluffycloud”]Curious about the current state of things. It seems things are becoming more legit, but how popular and risky are the more illegal side of things.

Is one’s odds of getting deported higher if they were to get a kindy job? a fake degree?

is the common punishment for a fake degree higher than kindy teaching?[/quote]

Document forgery is a crime.
Working in a kindergarten is a violation of your visa conditions ( a civil violation) at best.

I was thinking about doing the first one myself when I was replaced by some teacher holding a fake degree which I could not offer in order take over a full-time position.
I can’t prove that his/her degree was fake, but the lack of knowledge was too obvious.[/quote]

and what stopped you?

[quote=“fluffycloud”][quote=“Hamletintaiwan”][quote=“fluffycloud”]Curious about the current state of things. It seems things are becoming more legit, but how popular and risky are the more illegal side of things.

Is one’s odds of getting deported higher if they were to get a kindy job? a fake degree?

is the common punishment for a fake degree higher than kindy teaching?[/quote]

Document forgery is a crime.
Working in a kindergarten is a violation of your visa conditions ( a civil violation) at best.

I was thinking about doing the first one myself when I was replaced by some teacher holding a fake degree which I could not offer in order take over a full-time position.
I can’t prove that his/her degree was fake, but the lack of knowledge was too obvious.[/quote]

and what stopped you?[/quote]

Why should I risk prosecution and deportation when I can stay here legally and do what I am doing now?
If I weren’t married here, I might say … Ok let’s go for it and if they catch me I get kicked out. So what?
However, document forgery is considered a crime in most/many countries and you might end up with a criminal record.
In my opinion, it’s not worth it.

Finish your studies and if you still feel like coming to Taiwan, do so.
If you don’t have a degree, then the only option would be to get married.

There are already so many teachers with fake degrees here that teaching has become a low income business.
I like to think that someone with a university degree would not work below 800NT$ per hour.

Anyhow, risking deportation and a bad record so you can be a slave dealing with deways. I don’t know if I ever would do that. Sure not!

I’d like to think that too.

What reality-avoidance techniques/drugs do you recommend?

There’s really no need to choose. You could do both.

When you apply for your ARC you need to get your degree verified by the local Taiwan trade office in your country. They won’t tell you but when your prospective employer takes your degree and makes a copy the authorities then fax it to the trade office/embassy. They in turn contact the school/college/university to verify it. This new rule was only implemented a few years back and there is always a chance that some lazy bugger won’t bother faxing it and it will just be approved but the most likely outcome is that you get done for providing forged documents and then possibly deported. Not worth it. You could always come here and find some marriage minded local lass and get hitched but that’s a whole other kettle of fish innit?

Probably shouldn’t publicise this, but before coming here I checked back with the granting institution for one of my masters degrees (MSc IT, Napier University, Edinburgh) and they apparently had no record of it. (!)

I have the degree certificate (with distinction, already), and I subsequently worked for a guy who was on the staff at the time (so he remembered and vouched for me) but the department has been absorbed by another one and they’ve apparently “lost” the records.

I suppose I should have tried to sort it out, but I had another one (MSc Environmental Remote Sensing, Aberdeen University) so I didn’t bother.

I did, however, cite the first one and havn’t had any comeback from it.

Neither of them are much help coping with American Headway. Thats Post-doc level stupidity.

Where did you hear this from? Universities do not accept calls to verify degrees, nor do they give out personal information to anyone but the student/alumnus himself. They’d need to staff a call centre if they did. Imagine all the calls they’d have to take from prospective employers and others in regards to the hundreds of thousands of degrees and certificates they’d issued over the years. The only way to verify that a degree is legit is to get a sealed transcript of grades mailed directly from the university to the employer or government agency, without it ever touching the applicant’s hands. That Taiwan does not do this, and instead relies on copies of the diploma parchment, goes a long way toward explaining why degree forgery is as rampant as it is in Taiwan.

I guess everyone’s experience is different. When I applied to work here and when I applied for grad school, TECO LA demanded my unopened transcripts sent directly from the school and I had to get a few things notarized, too.

Very a-typical. Perhaps you originally applied for your work permit outside of Taiwan? In over a decade here, I’ve never been asked for transcripts for work permit processing, or by employers themselves. Did have to notarize a set for grad school application, though. But never for a job. However, let’s not get sidetracked. My main point was universities do not respond to inquiries from 3rd parties regarding their students or alumni.

In 2008, the buxiban I accepted a job with asked me for sealed grade transcripts (which I had fortunately brought with me) to send along with my degree copy when applying for my work permit. This is the only school I’ve worked for so I don’t know if this is a standard practice or not.

Interesting. Maybe they are going to greater lengths to verify these days? I admit, I haven’t needed a work permit in quite a while, so I may be out of date. Anyway, the transcript request only supports my central argument, which is that universities do not take calls in order verify credentials. MOFA/TECO can only verify that a school exists and is on the approved list of universities. You need sealed transcripts sent direct from the university to know for certain if a degree is legit.

Honestly, there are a ton of foreigners here with fake certificates and diplomas. Any degrees issued in the UK, Australia, or the US can be verified easily through a government regulated clearing house. There have been a lot of men and women that came to the island over the last couple of decades that now have legal status or are married on the island, so there is little an employer can do regarding their false credentials. The manager of the language school that I work at dropped out of high school, and he has never taken a class at a higher education institution. He has been honest with our employer, so they just pay him in cash. He flies out of the country every 2 months. With that said, our employer is a bit of a tyrant, and she has little respect for foreigners anyways. Our function is more as window dressing than anything else. This is why South Africans, some of whom speak very little English, are able to maintain working status on the island.