Fake name brand goods - nowhere to be found?

I’ve been to a few of the night markets and they all have the same crap - fake Taiwan brands with bad English and ridiculously large ugly logos - whether you’re talking clothes, wallets, etc. It’s hard to find a single wallet without some rambling “English” sentence… totally tasteless.

My question is where is the fake name brand stuff, where the producers here do what they do best (rip off and cheaply manufacture goods) and leave the design to those who know what they’re doing?

I’m leaving Friday to go to the states for Christmas so if you know of somewhere I appreciate the heads up!

Most of the shops behind California on ZhongXiao E sell knock off stuff from China but sell it as original at discount prices…IMHO. In other words you get it cheap if it was real, but too expensive for copy stuff.

Cheapskate loser. :raspberry:

It’s all over the place and it causes huge losses for all sorts of legitimate companies. It also greatly harms Taiwan’s international reputation (they’ve been fighting with the US Trade Representative’s office over this for years) and is just tacky, for the buyer and seller.

It’s also especially tacky as a xmas present: “Here mom, here’s a fake gucci bag I bought in Taiwan. And for you, bro, a fake Nike shirt.” I’m sure they’ll be thrilled.

True enough, but sometimes it’s just plain fun. I went out looking for the tackiest rhinestone-studded fake rolex I could find, just for the pure cheesiness of it. I bought a couple of “Mike” and “Lavi” products for my friends back home a few years ago and they enjoyed a laugh too. Good fun…even if it is wrong, I guess.

Sorry, MT, but I just don’t buy all of that. If a producer has real costs from things like R&D and it would be unprofitable to engage in such R&D unless their rights to whatever product they are producing were protected for a period, then I agree that their IP should be protected. There are plenty of medicines that would never have gotten government approval and made it to market unless the risks of development were proected by IP law. Such protection is beneficial to society as a whole, not just for the producer. How is it beneficial to everyone for LV and the like to enjoy protection for their brands? It’s not like they put a large amount of money into R&D or design. The knock off producers in Guangdong can produce the same bag to the same standards. If a company relies on logo instead of creativity or quality to sell its products, then I have very little sympathy when their product is pirated. Is Necroflux a cheapskate? Perhaps so, but that doesn’t make him a loser. IMO, the real loser is the guy who would waste money on silly things like LV bags or other branded apparel.

MT, you are usually not one to side with the establishment. I seem to remember that your work involves you in IP stuff. It’s one thing to make a living doing that, but you don’t actually believe all of this IP nonsense that coporations would like us to accept, do you? Are you becoming a tool for the man? :wink:

I agree. If a company needs the benefit of IP protection to make it worthwhile investing in R&D (or other investment costs), that’s an especially good case to argue the benefits of IPR (although I admit the issue grows more complex when one considers millions of people who can’t afford expensive, life-saving medicines but could afford cheap, knock-off drugs that serve the same purpose).

Perhaps, but they put vast amounts of money into marketing, advertising and boosting their image and name-brand recognition. Trademarks, logos and the like can have tremendous value. This report places the value of the world’s leading brand, Coca-Cola, at US$67,000,000,000. Second place Microsoft brand is valued at US$56,000,000,000.
bwnt.businessweek.com/brand/2006/

Does it bother you to see these Subber stores in Taiwan that are obvious rip-offs of the logo, design and whole set-up of the Subway stores that they started out as, before the owners decided they were tired of paying the franchise fees and wanted to lure unaware customers into their shops believing it was that big-name US sandwich franchise that used to operate on the same spot? It does bother me. They’re stealing. They’re tricking ignorant passersby. It’s a form of fraud. They’re also a bunch of cheap losers. IF they can make better sandwiches, cheaper, then by all means go for it and put Subway out of business. But if they can’t honestly compete on their own and have to trick the customers to lure them in, that’s lousy.

People pay for the logo, for hte name-brand recognition. For those people the logo and reputation DO have great value. Some people are proud to be known as gucci-wearing, LV carrying, mercedes driving consumers. It makes them feel wealthy and privileged. Others like wearing nike or adidas because it makes them feel sporting and athletic. People feel that way about brands because the huge investments that have been made in the brands, including paying athletes and other stars to wear, use or advertise the products.

Yes, I agree it all seems so phony and stupid. But I think we all fall for hte hype of branding from time to time. Perhaps you bought an IBM laptop because you, to a certain extent based only on marketing, believed it’s better. Or michelen tires for your car. Or a Ralph Lauren shirt.

It seems totally silly with regard to LV bags and gucci shoes, but very few of us don’t have any items that weren’t purchased, at least in part, due to hte effect of marketing and name-brand recognition.

I admit, I don’t know if he’s a cheapskate or a loser. Maybe he just thought it would be funny. As for the other point, as I said, LV bags seem silly, but I’m sure your purchases have been influenced by branding.

True, I do feel I must be getting old making arguments such as this one. :frowning: :laughing:

True, I’m an IP lawyer. But actually I’m on the other side now. I work for a huge tech company and am constantly handling demands that are made upon us for licensing and payments of royalties from various patent owners, so if anything I should be more sympathetic to your position. As you know, it’s exceptionally difficult to make a profit manufacturing tech products today with so many people demanding licensing of dubious patents and threatening multi-million dollar lawsuits. I agree, in that regard the threats and demands of IP owners are often completely counterproductive for society and the industry. It’s often some little guy with a crappy little patent for some obvious feature that they’re using to coerce many millions of dollars from hard-working manufacturers with very slim profit margins. I genuinely believe that. But that’s a different subject. The patent system is in serious need of reform. But, as I said, I must be getting old because I do believe in generall the protection of IPR is a good thing for society.

I think rip-off goods as gifts are tacky as all hell, and buying them is a sign of poor taste.

What’s almost worse is that the originals they’re ripping off were often tacky or ugly to begin with. Like those turd-brown handbacks with a repeated pattern.

Ugly as sin. :noway:

I read in Business Week once that a lot of the knockoff products come from the same factory that produce the real goods. They’ll run an extra shift overnight when the pesky Western manager isn’t there and run the products out the back door.

I also remember reading once in the NY Times that while luxury good companies certainly don’t encourage it, they tacitly accept the knock-off products. The 25-year old broke assistant editor buys knock-off Gucci bags and develops brand loyalty to them, so she buys the real thing when she’s older and wealthier.

Hand bags, sports shoes and fake Rolex’s are only a part of the counterfeit market. Quite often fake parts and fake prescription drugs can mean death.

Bogus parts have turned up in commercial jets. Where’s the FAA?
Plane parts on black market plagues airline industry
Or even an entire aircraft -
Counterfeit Aircraft

And fake perscrition drugs -
Counterfeit Drugs: A Rising Public Health Problem
COMBATING COUNTERFEIT DRUGS
Counterfeit prescription drugs a global problem
World Health Organization warns of international health and safety hazards

Its not all about the bling-bling.

If we didn’t have intellectual property rights for brands then as customers we’d have no way to know whether a branded product is of the same quality, taste, safety, etc. as the last time we bought it. Brands would become worthless and then any cheap huckster could go around selling products with no guarantee of any standards at all. As consumers we can count on certain standards when buying a product if it’s a brand we’re familiar with.

As a business, why would you invest time, money, and effort into developing quality branded products if anyone could rip them off and sell an inferior product under the same brand? A brand gives a business an incentive to deliver products to a certain standard to ensure that their business can grow.

And I beg to differ that the knock-off LV bags are of the same quality. I’ve seen some really really good quality LV knockoffs but they are not the same quality. Also LV and many other high end brands have lifetime guarantees and will even repair products damaged by the customer with no questions asked. You are not getting the same thing with a knock off.

Are the knock off manufacturers following labor standards or running sweat shops? Are they following hazardous materials standards or not? Are they they getting their materials in a renewable and sustainable way or not? Are the products safe to use or not? You have no way of knowing whether your knock-off LV bag is made by starving 10 year old children kept in slavery and made out of leather from the dead bodies of Falun Gong members and use mercury in their production and dumping hazardous waste products into the surrounding enviornment. That is an extreme example, but really you have no way of knowing.

Plus your argument reads like “I don’t like luxury brands so I don’t mind them being ripped off.”

I eat at the Subber in Taoyuan. It’s quite good. As opposed to KLG whose fried chicken sucks tenderloin.

I love the KLG close to my house.
Unfortunately its about every 4 months due to the tai tais health rules.
But their fried chicken is excellent!

Don’t forget that they’ll tan your arse for you at customs – both here and in the US – if they find you with knockoff goods. They don’t just confiscate the stuff, they prosecute. Happy Christmas.

Really? I love the chicken sandwich at the KLG near my work. They use real, fresh chicken breast (not the ground up etc. parts like they use at McD’s or KFC) and I love the sliced apple and coleslaw they put on the sandwich. So much cheaper and more delicious than KFC.

KLG chickens suck tenderloins? No wonder they are so tasty.

I had a KLC or KLG (?) chicken sandwich once. They took a plain bun, slapped two and a half overcooked, lukewarm chicken fingers on it, squirted a TON of mayo on it, and wrapped it up. It was absolutely awful. Maybe the quality varies by branch (unlike major US franchises), but at least avoid the Donghu branch!

Was in Taipei last week and saw “Subber” for the first time, I just had to have a laugh :smiley: Night market just near my place here sells fake stuff and quality is very good, but again its not exactly dirt cheap, $75 USD or so for some brand name bag I cant remember Im not into that stuff.

itaewon in korea is where the best knockoff bags can be found.

If we didn’t have intellectual property rights for brands then as customers we’d have no way to know whether a branded product is of the same quality, taste, safety, etc. as the last time we bought it. Brands would become worthless and then any cheap huckster could go around selling products with no guarantee of any standards at all. As consumers we can count on certain standards when buying a product if it’s a brand we’re familiar with.

As a business, why would you invest time, money, and effort into developing quality branded products if anyone could rip them off and sell an inferior product under the same brand? A brand gives a business an incentive to deliver products to a certain standard to ensure that their business can grow.

And I beg to differ that the knock-off LV bags are of the same quality. I’ve seen some really really good quality LV knockoffs but they are not the same quality. Also LV and many other high end brands have lifetime guarantees and will even repair products damaged by the customer with no questions asked. You are not getting the same thing with a knock off.

Are the knock off manufacturers following labor standards or running sweat shops? Are they following hazardous materials standards or not? Are they they getting their materials in a renewable and sustainable way or not? Are the products safe to use or not? You have no way of knowing whether your knock-off LV bag is made by starving 10 year old children kept in slavery and made out of leather from the dead bodies of Falun Gong members and use mercury in their production and dumping hazardous waste products into the surrounding enviornment. That is an extreme example, but really you have no way of knowing.

Plus your argument reads like “I don’t like luxury brands so I don’t mind them being ripped off.”[/quote]

Great Post Jlick. From my experience most people would rather not have to buy the fake product, and there ARE ways for companies to avoid it. The best example I can think of is the Ipod. Even for those without oodles of cash to spend can now pick up the new shuffle for under $100USD. I don’t think it devalues the brand at all to bring out a lower end model.

I guess with handbags though, its not like you can really remove features…not that I know anything about handbags…honestly. :blush:

sd