Families around the world photographed with weekly shopping

Interesting article! I love to see this kind of stuff.

dailymail.co.uk/news/article … 0-320.html

How much you guys think is the average spend, let’s say, of a family of 4 in Taipei or Taichung vs a more rural area here on Taiwan? Or between locals and expats?

The difference between the Sudanese family in Chad, and the Indian and Egyptian families is instructive. They spend about the same amount of money, but the guys in Chad are getting next-to-nothing for it. Interesting also that the Indians and Egyptians have a load of fresh vegetables there instead of little plastic packets. Chad and “The Rich” are both fucked, but in different ways. Egypt and India have their problems, but it looks like they’re not far off the sweet spot as far as food supply is concerned. The family in Ecuador look like they’re eating pretty well too. It would have made more sense to present prices as a percentage of typical local income though, rather than converting to GBP.

I know we (2ppl) spend ~12K a month on food, but we eat out a lot, so it’s not a reasonable comparison.

The Mexican family really like Coca Cola.

Apparently people drink loads of soft drinks in third world countries because the water is polluted or tainted. The reasoning is that Coca Cola have a reputation to uphold and don’t use dodgy water. This is often true because the gov’t gives them license to tap water sources that the hoi polloi don’t have access to.

Wow, this is about ten years old. Those prices must be way out of date by now.

The Daily Mail is such a shite newspaper.

Pardon me, six years old: amazon.com/Hungry-Planet-Wha … world+eats

This particular one is a new one (or possibly updated one) not the one from six years ago.

When a single company makes 10 to 30 % or more of your GDP, they do have a lot of leeway.

Plus yes, water problems. I do notice water expenditure is big in both developing and developed countries, by the bottled shown. Others don’t even have that choice.

I imagine dentists do quite nicely, too.

Yes, it’s a great pity, because water management is not difficult at all. If low-income countries would stop giving away their resources (or rights to those resources) to rich foreign multinationals, they’d find it becomes even less difficult. I heard Tata, for example, is selling a sub-$10 water filter that catches most pollutants. In a pinch, you can make an effective biofilter with sand, graded gravel, and a couple of big pots. Of course, it helps if you don’t let every man and his dog dump industrial effluent into the water sources in the first place.

I’m pretty sure it isn’t. I recognise the pictures (used this for teaching when it came out). Unless they’ve just recalculated the prices.

Just checked the Hungry Planet book on Amazon. It’s the same pictures from six years ago. You can see the two US kids holding pizza.

I wonder what a Taiwanese one would look like? Lots of restaurant meals and take-aways.

I’m pretty sure it isn’t. I recognise the pictures (used this for teaching when it came out). Unless they’ve just recalculated the prices.

Just checked the Hungry Planet book on Amazon. It’s the same pictures from six years ago. You can see the two US kids holding pizza.

I wonder what a Taiwanese one would look like? Lots of restaurant meals and take-aways.[/quote]

Well then it’s not just the Daily Mail at fault. It’s been all over the media this week. :idunno:

It’s very interesting. In Taiwan’s case many don’t actually cook much as they eat out so often. A lot of Bian Dangs and hot pot and tea drinks perhaps? Still there must be plenty of people who still cook as traditional markets are just everyday.

Some families spent enormous amounts on food, even for a western family. The book would be interesting to get a breakdown on where they were spending the money.

My chic was commenting how the guys from California looked like 70s people lol.

Taiwan?

Turkey and India seem to get a lot bang for the buck. Germany not surprisingly has most beer.

First thing I noticed too, another thing is why did they choose two Arctic families (Greenland and Canada)? There isn’t a representative population in the extreme north to merit even one family.

The world is much better fed than it was 30 years ago. This is a nice trend.

Yes it’s a nice trend, but many (most) are too well fed, which is why up to 1/3 of the populations of even developing countries are predicted to get diabetes!
Well it’s actually the food they are eating too which is fairly obvious from the pics.
I think it’s interesting how brands have infiltrated the lives of so many in industrialized countries. They grow up with these brands and pass them on to the kids.

I’m pretty sure it isn’t. I recognise the pictures (used this for teaching when it came out). Unless they’ve just recalculated the prices.

Just checked the Hungry Planet book on Amazon. It’s the same pictures from six years ago. You can see the two US kids holding pizza.

I wonder what a Taiwanese one would look like? Lots of restaurant meals and take-aways.[/quote]

Well then it’s not just the Daily Mail at fault. It’s been all over the media this week. :idunno:[/quote]

Maybe it’s just clever marketing? I read the Daily Mail article and it says The Hungry Planet is a new book. But if you look on Amazon it says it was released in 2007, and the photographer won a prize for the work in 2006. Strike that. Paperback in 2007, hardback 2005 from the reviews beneath.

This one’s interesting too. Breakfasts Around the World Not accurate, but interesting to see different national dishes.

Oh please, like Indians don’t have cheese, and frozen smileys and packets and packets of biscuits. Sure it isn’t as bad as westerners but, you’re telling me, the Indian woman in that pic got fat eating veggies??? :laughing: