Floods in China

So frightening ! Being on a big landmass
means floods affect more people because the water can’t find a place to go

On an island at least there is the ocean to go to for the flood waters

2 Likes

Images from the northern part of Guangdong—aboslutely frightening.

Guy

1 Like

Poor people, frightening stuff.

Could also have something to do with China’s obsession with buggering about with grand projects involving rivers etc., while simultaneously messing up their environment to the point where hydrologic cycles are dramatically altered.

1 Like

Several cities in China are actually sinking because they keep using their ground water and the built heavy buildings on marsh land.

1 Like

Xi Jinping will pull these people out of the flood water so that he could punish them for breaking their quarantine.

4 Likes

Indeed. Taiwan has a very lucky geography in these regards. Feel bad for those countries with such disasters . Flooding isnt really a thing here in any meaningful way.

1 Like

Same in taiwan :slight_smile: pingdong, chunghua and south etc. Its a real problem people seem to be ignoring.

before huge drains were installed Taipei city used to flood in some areas. I remember Typhoon Gloria (yes im that old, I was a young kid then) where I was on the second floor of a 3 story apt. And we were flooded in for a week. The water was just 2 feet from where we were for almost a week !! Our neighbor downstairs went to stay with our 3rd floor neighbors for the week until the flood waters receded.

Lucky we always knew to fill our bathtub with water and to have gas to cook. With no electricity food spoils so we ate canned food with rice for a week. But we survived . Then taipei city put in these HUGE drains.

Ask any Taipei oldster about typhoon Gloria a truly infamous typhoon since over shadowed by typhoon Morakot That name will live in infamy Not that morakot did a lot in taipei . There was another taipei foon that flooded the MRT but I wasn’t there for that one

2 Likes

In 2001, Typhoon Nari took out the Red Line.

Water level markers showing the flooding then are—or at least were—posted in parts of Ximen MRT Station.

You can ask @Icon about it.

Guy

2 Likes

I worked over at Zhonghe. Three months of traffic chaos are seared in my mind.

4 Likes

Indeed. We get floods. But i was leaning more towards our lucky geography in that we get SERIOUS rains and the floods are relatively meh compared to many inland regions with lesser rainfall. Our floods are inconvenient, but rarely eat towns or go to the second floor. I was in the middle of morakot and even then once the rains stopped, so did the floods whuch werent everywhere surprisingly. We measured over our container size of 2 meters plus per day of rain for 3 days straight in that one. No joke. But taiwan faired quite well all things considered.

Our ditch systems surely are to thank/blame for our water situations now. There are scattered random low spots that stay wet, but rarely do we worry about say ximen washing into the ocean. The flipside of that is now we have water shortages. Wonder if there is a happy medium somewhere?

1 Like

These floods caused by back-building convective precipitation systems seem to be becoming an annual event in China.

Northern Taiwan is actually caught in the same system this year, but the results are fortunately nowhere near as destructive.

2 Likes

Everytime I think of the heavy rains and flood potentials of Taiwan vs other areas I just tell myself (to make myself happy) “we are on a prism in the middle of the ocean” :joy: the floods here can’t be as great as more flat/inland/wide peices of land. We have so many drainage points here. One of the perks of mountianous island life.

2 Likes

Dongting lake, the second largest lake in China, breached on July 5th, and the breach at one point widened to 226 meters. They claim the breach has been temporarily sealed, but at least 210M cubic meter worth of flood water still needs to be dissipated, and they estimate it would take 12 days.

2 Likes