Food scandal/food scare thread

How does one determine caffeine content? It depends on beans, roast, how the coffee was made …

Copy whatever your competitor says.

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This thread just keeps giving. :face_vomiting:

Guy

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More trouble, this time in Taichung harbour:

Guy

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as usual

I was interested a while back in what salts were used to set tofu in Taiwan. Rather comically, I found my answer in the photos attached to this piece in yesterday’s news.

Calcium sulfate, calcium chloride.

Meanwhile in Pingtung:

Guy

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Raisins turned away because of sulfur dioxide. :confused:

That’s a lot of blueberries !
They are very strict on importation but anyone can rock up to any market in Taiwan or on the pavement outside it and sell any kind of food with no labels and no food sanitation standards . :joy::joy::joy:
That is a -#*king joke my friends.

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I thought the sulfur dioxide ban was particularly entertaining. I mean here is a preservative that has been used since, I don’t know, Roman times, and we are getting our backs up about it. After sleeping on having used industrial chemicals to dye tofu yellow, plasticisers to make drinks cloudy, and Vietnamese animal feed oil to make our bread soft, we’ve turned over a new leaf. Public enemy number one now is sulfur dioxide!

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It’s all about face

Bad food, still this day here

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I don’t think the piece explains how the problem of adulterated food was overcome. They mention the laws were not effective at around 7:36, and then they don’t really resolve it. There is a little soundbyte at the end about consumer pressure…

Yes, seems not. More a history lesson. Taiwan did not learn the lesson, last time plastic power was added to milk tea, which did bad things to males.