Food scandal thread


#241

Europe, America, same difference.

The food police have pretty much put a stop to traditional food production methods. There are some exceptions associated with the protected-origin rules, but mostly it’s all stainless steel and bleach these days. Thanks, EU bureaucrats.


#242

Damn, beat me to it.


#243

Yet I do trust EU food.


#244

Only the finest organic toe cheese.


#245

Yes. Not exactly SWJ, but some people are called “pies negros” for a reason.


#246

You shouldn’t. There were widespread eggs scandals like last year in Belgium/NL and affected all EU states (and beyond), and in England there’s been some poisonous frozen corns and ppl died.

Oh and in Australia and NZ there’s been some real fucked-up strawberries with NEEDLES in them. It’s horrifying.


#247

I think Sauerkraut in the Germanic areas.


#248

Hopefully they used relatively new blue slippers. The secret ingredient for the real local flavor.

63-blue%20slippers


#249

Nowadays it’s all made with machines but this is the traditional method. Notice the lack of shoes.


#250

Much as it pains me to do so, I’m going to have to give Gain a ‘like’.

The pen-pushers have really messed up European agriculture and post-production. Sauerkraut actually ferments just fine without the feet - the aim is simply to get it packed down - but assuming they’re given a good scrub to begin with I don’t see how this is inherently more unhygienic than using one’s hands (bare hands, of course, being the standard appendage used for food prep before PVC gloves became the norm … and the associated mountains of PVC landfill).

The entire European food chain is now utterly fucked. It’s slightly better than the US, and some mid-sized companies have found workarounds for the nonsensical rules. However, it’s one of the reasons (a minor one, since most people aren’t aware of the details) that British people voted for Brexit.

Silly joke:

A baker walks into the back of the shop and finds his apprentice using his teeth to crimp the edges of pies. He smacks him on the head and tells him, “WTF is wrong with you? Don’t you have a tool?”. Apprentice says, sure, but I use that for making the holes in the doughnuts.


#251

I am sorry but I do not get the refrence. Will Google.


#252

It’s salted and fermented and it will sour-up (acidify), kill all bad bugs.


#253

Exactly. Unfortunately in Taiwan the produce will go from the shoes directly onto your plate.


#254

Part of what has happened is that EU directives put a burden of paperwork that is no bother for big businesses, but not so for small businesses who get red taped out of the market. And the big businesses are obviously fine with that, in fact they encourage it, as it pushes out competition.

He must have been a “Master Baker”


#255

I avoid eggs from Changhua whenever possible.


#256

Exactly. Cnuts.


#257

Not so surprised sadly … never trusted the labels anyways, usually they write something like “low fat” to hide that is actually very high in sugar, or say “ no artificial colors “ but they add a bunch of additives and chemicals that are way worse. The truth is that unless you are making the food yourself you will never know what’s really inside it.
I remember when I was young my mom wouldn’t let me eat anything packaged ( except rare occasions), everything was made at home from her, if I wanted those chocolate cookies I would see on tv she would just make me something similar but healthier and of course as a kid I always looked at other kids and wondered why I also didn’t get the chips, cookies and so on that you could buy at the supermarket …
I consider myself so lucky today that she did that because it actually gave an insight to healthy eating.
Taiwan has a really big issue with junk food ( as most of the world tbh) and children are getting fatter and fatter because of it. I believe what is lacking is the knowledge about healthy eating and what is really in the food they eat, they should teach this in school and teach this to the parents as well.


#258

Most eggs come from Changhua. So does much of the rice.