Fortune cookies

Where to buy fortune cookie in Taiwan?
and how much it cost?
thanks!

[quote=“Hope89”]Where to buy fortune cookie in Taiwan?
and how much it cost?
thanks![/quote]
I’ve never seen a fortune cookie anywhere in Asia in all the years I’ve lived and traveled here.

Fotune cookies are an American thing. I’ve never seen them here or in the UK either, for that matter.

Do they have fortune cookies in Taiwan, Hong Kong, or China?

My kitchen drawer is full of fortune cookies, from all the Chinese food take-out and deliveries.
There must be hundreds of them over the years. There’s also a big pile take-out menus from
the 3 dozen or so Chinese restaurant within a 5 mile radius… :frowning:

You must be North American. Fortune cookies are North American. They were invented in San Francisco. Do a search. There are other threads about this on Forumosa.

Do the more expensive ones come in nice re-usable boxes like those abominable “mooncakes”?

[quote=“Lord Lucan”]Do the more expensive ones come in nice re-usable boxes like those abominable “mooncakes”?[/quote]More expensive ones? Fortune cookies are free, given out at the end of the meal at your typical Chinese restaurant in the USA and Canada.

I learned the hard way how to fold fortune cookies properly during Chinese New Year this year. It took me 14 cookies before I got it right. And you can only cook them two at a time…

They still tasted good.

Ya never know…

[quote=“ImaniOU”]I learned the hard way how to fold fortune cookies properly during Chinese New Year this year. It took me 14 cookies before I got it right. And you can only cook them two at a time…

They still tasted good.[/quote]

You do realized that fortune cookes are made by machines now? :slight_smile:

They can make up to 27 fortune cookes per minute with one single
machine. (at least at the small shop that I visited last year)

[quote=“creamypanda”][quote=“ImaniOU”]I learned the hard way how to fold fortune cookies properly during Chinese New Year this year. It took me 14 cookies before I got it right. And you can only cook them two at a time…

They still tasted good.[/quote]

You do realized that fortune cookes are made by machines now? :slight_smile:

They can make up to 27 fortune cookes per minute with one single
machine. (at least at the small shop that I visited last year)[/quote]

There’s the Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory in San Francisco’s Chinatown. They have two machines that are hand-operated. They make lots of cookies.

Grrr… then go to those places and get your own damn cookies. I didn’t wanna share none of cookies with y’all poopyheads no ways. :stinkyface:

Mine are 100% original ImaniOU cookies with forumosacized fortunes, but you two are officially off my cookie list.

So there. :stuck_out_tongue:

My understanding was that the first fortune cookie (as we understand them from cheap U.S. Asian restaurants) was invented by a Japanese confectioner in San Francisco. But there are conflicting accounts. See: http://www.answers.com/topic/fortune-cookie

In the states, it is almost expected that an Asian restaurant, especially a Chinese restaurant, will have fortune cookies. You will find them offered in many Vietnamese restaurants as well. Ironically, I’ve never seen them in Japanese restaurants. I’ve also never seen them in Korean restaurants in the states, but Korean restaurants are not nearly as widespread and tend to cater to Korean-American communities.

My wife and I had a Taiwanese friend we met while I was finishing my undergrad in Minnesota. When we later met up with him again in Taipei, he told us that the two things he missed most about the USA were (1) Starbucks and (2) Fortune Cookies. At least he eventually got his Starbucks.

I think all American-style restaurants in Taiwan (TGIF, Subway, Starbucks, McDonalds, etc.) should offer free fortune cookies with every order. Taiwanese will come to see them as traditional American fare. It’d be a fun way to mix things up a bit. The fortune would be on one side and an English word or phrase with a Chinese translation would be on the other side. Oh, and we mustn’t forget the “lucky numbers”…they should have a lot of fours in them.

Today’s New York Times has an article on the possible Japanese origins of the fortune cookie: Solving a Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside a Cookie, by Jennifer 8. Lee, who has a book coming out in March called The Fortune Cookie Chronicles.

An excerpt from the article:

[quote]Ms. Nakamachi is still unsure how exactly fortune cookies made the jump to Chinese restaurants. But during the 1920s and 1930s, many Japanese immigrants in California owned chop suey restaurants, which served Americanized Chinese cuisine. The Umeya bakery distributed fortune cookies to well over 100 such restaurants in southern and central California.

“At one point the Japanese must have said, fish head and rice and pickles must not go over well with the American population,” said Mr. Ono, who has made a campaign of documenting the history of the fortune cookie through interviews with his relatives and by publicizing the discovery of the kata grills.

Early on, Chinese-owned restaurants discovered the cookies, too. Ms. Nakamachi speculates that Chinese-owned manufacturers began to take over fortune cookie production during World War II, when Japanese bakeries all over the West Coast closed as Japanese-Americans were rounded up and sent to internment camps.

Mr. Wong pointed out: “The Japanese may have invented the fortune cookie. But the Chinese people really explored the potential of the fortune cookie. It’s Chinese-American culture. It only happens here, not in China.”

That sentiment is echoed among some descendants of the Japanese immigrants who played an early role in fortune cookies. “If the family had decided to sell fortune cookies, they would have never done it as successfully as the Chinese have,” said Douglas Dawkins, the great-great-grandson of Makoto Hagiwara. “I think it’s great. I really don’t think the fortune cookie would have taken off if it hadn’t been popularized in such a wide venue.”[/quote]

Yes, except in the more authentic Chinese restaurants, Chinese speaking patrons are often given free dessert instead while the big-noses always always get the fortune cookies. The free dessert can range from orange slices to red bean soup to sweet tofu jelly. If you’re lucky (you being a Chinese speaker, that is), you might even get taro soup with tapioca and coconut milk. :hungry:

Don’t forget the crappy translations. It adds to the fun.

My girlfriend (a Taiwanese) was thoroughly confused when I began asking her about fortune cookies “at home.” We had just eated a (assuredly Americanized) Chinese meal and the obligatory cookies were laid down atop the check.

I must have seemed terribly American when she was chuckling about my misconception and I just looked puzzled. :smiley:

Although, I got her back when she returned for Xmas (after being back in Taipei for five weeks) and there was a tree in the house. She thought that only happened in movies. :laughing:

Where does that happen? I’d like to go to a place like that. My wife is a native Chinese speaker and we never get free desserts. The best I’ve done is that I’ve had a woman in a cafeteria throw in some extra veggies because I spoke Chinese to her.

How do you know it is free? Perhaps the local Chinese tell the boss in Chinese, "please don’t give me a crap fortune cookie, save that for the tasteless foreigners that can’t appreciate real Chinese desserts. Please bring me some sweet red bean soup. " Besides could you imagine the curled nostrils and turned down mouths of the non-Chinese when offered taro root or red bean soup for dessert!?

If they do give them dessert for free, it might be because they come two or three times a week and they are VIPS and most likely has nothing to do with racism.

There’s an episode of The Twilight Zone (eighties version) titled “The Misfortune Cookie”.

You can Google the title so you can read the story. Spoilers of course, if you’d like to see the episode. The message is clearly “don’t fuck with the Chinese”. Perhaps a warning in the Food forum is a good thing :laughing:

This episode is must see… just had to think back about it reading this thread. :rainbow:

Where does that happen? I’d like to go to a place like that. My wife is a native Chinese speaker and we never get free desserts. The best I’ve done is that I’ve had a woman in a cafeteria throw in some extra veggies because I spoke Chinese to her.[/quote]

Well, that’s because you’re a big-noise (I’m presuming here), so that cancels out your wife’s Chinese-ness. :slight_smile: Actually, not all places have dessert, but just ask them when you ask for the bill. You’ll be pleasantly surprised.

As to where it happens, all over the place. In Canada: Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal. In the US: NYC, San Fran, Seattle.