Funny Things Between Chinese & Other Languages

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Many of you must have noticed that Taiwan, HK, and China have directly
imported the word “cool” in sound and meaning as "

japanese for bread is ‘pan’ . helps your arguement a little.
tempura,m a japanese stlye of battering food, is said to come from the portugese word meanning the same thing.
one of the japanese words for suit ‘sebiro’ comes from a guy whowent to england and ended up getting a suit from the famous ‘saville row’. anyone familiar with japlish (is that offensive? i dont care if it is!).
interesting.
I wonder how many realise that ‘game over’ is japanised english

typhoon comes from tai feng (mandarin) via tai fuun (japanese)

my father in law told me sai long means stirring the shit = shit stirrer
which means purposely causing trouble between people
exactly the same meaning as in english which is very interesting for such an abstract concept

che=chariot=cariage=cart=car
ma (hemp)= marijuana
si=silk
magic=mofa
simba= shi zi
gnu (wildebeast)= niu (as in gong niu)

cognates, borrowings or coincidences? depends on who you listen to.

one thing i have long wondered about is why the pacific ocean has virtually the same meaning in the chinese tai ping yang? the chinese had a name for it long before it was “discovered” sailors in the employ of the west.

[quote]my father in law told me sai long means stirring the shit = shit stirrer
which means purposely causing trouble between people
exactly the same meaning as in English which is very interesting for such an abstract concept [/quote]

in hakka, it’s called “look si gun”, look = stir, si = shit, gun = stick,
which means a troublemaker or busybody.

ax

[quote=“septic yank”]
si = silk
…why the pacific ocean has virtually the same meaning in the Chinese tai ping yang? the Chinese had a name for it long before it was “discovered” sailors in the employ of the west[/quote]
silk= si (

Yes, tempura (Portugese) --> tempura(

The evolving sequence should be:

silk reached the west long before the british empire rose. classical greeks knew of it and treasured it, even mere thin strips. the english word for silk worm farming, taken from the greeks, is sericulture.

How about Chinese

though a topic such as this can be sneeringly dismissed, it can also be a valuable learning source.

shakespeare wrote “woe is me.” did he know chinese? woe does indeed mean I,me.

there is a famous camera brand called nikon. everybody wants to look at good photographs and share them with friends…“you look!”. “you look” in chinese is “ni kan.”

the aussie dog is a dinGO. the chinese dog is GOU

if you are aware of such trivialities and share them with kids, they snap em up quite quickly and retain them. while studying chinese in jr.high we came up with scores of these as learning helps. a few years ago i related a handful of them to my nephews and they still drop them on me to this day.

I was told the word “catchup” came from Cantonese.
Can somebody here explain? Thanks!

i heard the same thing. the original ketchup was a south chinese fish sauce. sailors brought it home to britian. later tomatoes were added into the receipe, hence “tomato ketchup.” the website www.takeourword.com offers up hours of such nuggets.

english: give/gave
proto indo-european: *gwhei
mandarin: gei

I visited and toured around the site you provided, but I couldn’t find the information I’m looking for.

So, the origin of ‘ketchup’ has nothing to do with ‘catch-up’. The word sounds to me containing two syllables. What are the two corresponding Chinese characters?

[quote=“censorship”]I visited and toured around the site you provided, but I couldn’t find the information I’m looking for.

So, the origin of ‘ketchup’ has nothing to do with ‘catch-up’. The word sounds to me containing two syllables. What are the two corresponding Chinese characters?[/quote]

Oh, my! My friend here just read the two words

Our Taiwanese profeesor told us that the Taiwanese word for bread ‘pan’, came from the Spanish - not via the Japanese. In Taiwan a lot of the ‘Chinese’ words that come from Engliosh come via Japanese then Taiwanese. There are many many examples. Me and a 6th grade English class came up with about 50 one time.

English words that come from Chinese are much rarer. Typhoon (via Japanese), silk and tea are the obvious examples, but there are a few more modern ones that come via English colonial experience, such as ‘ammah’. Also interesting how the Chinese ‘tea’ came into the English language twice. First slowly from the Hokkien ‘de’ via other languages to become ‘tea’, then again from Mandarin to become the slang ‘cha’ that you still hear old women say in England ‘Cup of cha love?’.

On the other hand just guessing that certain words came from French or vice versa because of similarities is silly. There are a limited number of sounds for things and such a huge number of words, that statistically two completely unrelated languages are bound to hit upon the same word for the same thing sometimes. The Maori word for the sun-king Ra is exactly the same as the Ancient Egyptian - coincidence? Yes.

Brian

feng shui, toufu, guanxi, gung ho, kung fu…the list will just keep getting longer.

yeah, historical linguistics can get a bit sketchy. however, there were multiple silk roads stretching from the mediterrean (and beyond) to japan. goodness only knows what was added to the mix. the mummies of xinjiang are something you have no doubt heard of. sir aurel stein, a century ago, found remants of indo-european scripts in china. we really have no way of ascertaining just how much diffusion of ideas ebbed and flowed with the movement of the people. it IS acknowledged that korean is related to finnish. it is ackowledged that the turks have no problem talking to uiyghers (xin jiang). it is acknowledged that the mongols kicked everybody around and had a huge influence on the eurasian gene pool. just last year, russian researchers let out of the discovery of a here-to-fore unknown central eurasian culture. there is ALOT more out there under the sands.

a huge problem associated with such is the blind nationalism of the researchers. many amateurs have noticed plenny of similarities between sinitic and sinaitic script elements but the entrenched lords of academia refuse to even lend an ear.

french-chinese links could be attributed to diffusion from the arabic traders who spanned the distances between europe and the middle kingdom.

[quote=“tomyang”]By the same token, I suspect the daily used adverb “very”, “too” in
Mandarin: "