Gardening in Taiwan

My wife and I are moving to Kaohsiung in August. We have a 3 1/2 floor house which has a good sized roof, as well as some empty space behind the house which is of a suitable size for gardening. I was thinking that I’d make some boxes to put soil in. Does anyone out there have any advice about what to grow, planting times, etc?

Sounds like you should go down to the local flower market and check it out. It’s a great way to practice some Chinese.

Kaosiung is going to be hot most of the year, so you may well be able to grow lots of cool tropical plants, or just go with veggies all year round.

Good luck.

Yes, pretty much everything grows here most of the year round, though if you start things from seed, you may want to winter young plants inside Dec to CNY. Things that don

[quote]Also, if you

[quote=“jdsmith”][quote]Also, if you

Great topic!

Are their any gardeners in Taipei, who have the skinny on the best places to go to get stuff? (don’t mention the Ren 'ai market)

[quote=“Namahottie”]Great topic!

Are their any gardeners in Taipei, who have the skinny on the best places to go to get stuff? (don’t mention the Ren 'ai market)[/quote]

It depends on what kind of stuff you’re looking for.

There’s a good, but expensive flowermarket in neihu, or the flower road up on yang ming shan is great for mini-roses and other assorted mind blowing plants.

Cut flowers? Try costco. 158NT for a large bunch of cut flowers…verrrry nice.

Peyote is often available if you know how to recognize it. I’ve seen it in the Ren’ai weekend market several times.

Peyote is often available if you know how to recognize it. I’ve seen it in the Ren’ai weekend market several times.[/quote]

We SOOOOO need to go shopping together! :rainbow:

What sort of vegetables do you mean? Are we talking about good old Tomatoes, peppers, spinach and the like? I suppose that root veggies, potatoes, carrots, onions etc. could be a problem with the damp. What about flowers? what are your favorite local ones? What are your favorite North American or European imports that would do well in Taiwan?
As for the smokeable/eatable groovy stuff, I say thanks all the same and I’ll pass.

Yes, yes, yes and yes. Roots aren’t so good, but sweet potatoe is a no-brainer but it takes a lot of space.

(for Namahottie) I get a lot of my plants on Wen Lin Road up in Tien mu. There are several outdoor places that are open up to 6pm all week.

To the OP: Kaoshiung is sunnier than up North and so you might have to water you rooftop garden often. Especially if you are doing everything in pots. One way around this is to get succulents/cacti for the roof area – I’m not a big fan of these plants but they are one way around having to hoist buckets of water up on to the roof.

For your ground plot, trees with long tap roots will cut down on how often you have to water that.

As someone else mentioned, papaya trees are easy to grow from seeds. Mine is over 12’ tall and is bearing fruit. It was planted in March 2004.

If you’re renting the house as opposed to buying it, you might want to save costs by doing seed/cuttings runs into the mountains or Khh county. You can get all kinds of interesting vines, flowering plants and trees this way. One caveat: make sure you aren’t doing this on other people’s land.

Another thing I used to do was go to parks when plants/trees were seeding and take a few of the fallen seeds/pods to grow at home.

For my courtyard and Koi pond I bought everything from the Renai Flower Market, and I usually go there at least once a month to pick up additional items. Most of the vendors there are more than willing to deliver free of charge and the prices are much better if you have a local with you.

Also on a trip through Yangming Shan you can get some great deals from the vendors on the side of the roads.

Gardening here is not hard at all, you just have to treat your plants quite often due to the humidity and insects.

Very proud of my garden, I even planted grass so it reminds me of home having to cut the grass every weekend.

Good luck

i have had a hard time with plants… the humidity and changes in weather have killed most of them even when i water them as told by the plant shop people. bought two ivy last week. both are brown and rotted.
the plants i bought that have flowers are also a bit dodgy… im trying to find sturdy plants that don’t wilt so easily or die on me when the weather changes : :s

[quote=“bushibanned”]
the plants i bought that have flowers are also a bit dodgy… I’m trying to find sturdy plants that don’t wilt so easily or die on me when the weather changes : :s[/quote]

Why not just get what’s planted around town in public spaces? Those small purple flowers are very nice and can stand up to the Taiwan summer sun and humidity.

When in doubt go local.

I get these evil white things that sparodically apear on my chilli plants. They kind of look like woodlice but they’re tiny and white. Thay only seem to like the Chill plants though. Anyone got any idea what they are? They really bug me…

I’m not sure what they are but I know what you mean – my chilli’s and pepper plants get them. It kind of looks like white pocket lint that spreads over where the leaves and the stems connect, right?

If you want to get rid of them, put an infested leaf in a baggie and show it to the garden people at the markets. They know what it is ad will sell you this noxious stuff to disolve in water and spray on to the affected areas.

Then, they just dry up and blow off.

I always thought thet were a kind of aphid…no? They destroyed many of my tomato plants

Hijack some ladybugs from the local park and let them feast feast feast.

They’re mealy bugs and they’re nasty. They’ll kill your plants stone dead if you’re not careful. They got my 12-foot passion fruit vine when I was on holiday one time and totally destroyed it. You need to spray with insecticide, and you need to spray ALL your plants, not only those that appear infested. Pay particular attention to branch nodes, buds and the underside of the leaves. The insecticide might kill some of your buds but the plant will recover. Left untreated, the entire plant will certainly die.