Get married home first! Taiwan refuse to give JFRV

  1. I did marry first in taiwan. Am married to taiwanese native wife
  2. I can not get JFRV, cause they want authenticated document from their - taiwanese embassady abroad, making sure my marriage from taiwan is recognised, accepted, acknowledges in my EU country. As i understand is general rule no matter from which country you actually coming from.
    3.BOCA, And is clearly written on their page.

I posted for others, not making same mistake as i did. Do no get too comfortable and trust your future spouse. My wife calles offices, so someone told her wrong informations. Standards of goverent communication are different here.Yea is my mistake trusting my wife too much. However am not going back just for JFRV. I do not really need it. Originally i planned stay here for year, improve my mandarin but we will go back to europe earlier.

Taiwanese have no need to now the delicate intricacies of immigration policies. They do not have contcat with them on daily life. As to foreign affairs officials stationed in representative offices, they are the last person you should ask about these things as they are not the ones involved here nor are they up to datye. The office in charge would be NIA, not really BOCA, they just stamp the papers. And to talk to them you would have to talk to them here.

I do sense that this inconvenience fits into your plans/desires. Good luck in your marriage endeveaur.

Out of curiosity: is there any nation in the UE that does not recognize a marriage held in Taiwan? In the world? Under what circunstances?

I mean, recently, the ol country decided to require more paperwork from foreign residents regarding their marriages in order to renew their residences, so they held a massive local ceremony in which hundreds of couples got married again in order to circunscribe this requisite. So making life complicated is not an exclusive trait of ROC’s gummit - and ther eis always a hole in the Law.

Hmmm…I am a Canadian and recently received my JFRV. I got married in Taipei and the NIA had no trouble accepting my marriage certificate issued by Taiwan. The only document that I needed to authenticated was my no criminal record and that I needed to go back to Canada to get it as it is a lot easier.

Well ofc i want to hold JFRV. This is reason why i apply for it in the first place. Thanks for nice wishes.

Am not saying ROC government is only government in world making life complicated for foreigners, their communication is a bit weird at least and probably wife has own responsibility for mess, yea sure they can do whatever they want and no one is taking this rights from them. Am not here to complaint their laws, but expect proper communication.

Well office at BOCA told me clearly only way to get JFRV is going back home and authenticated marriage registration documents from my country at their embassy. Will call NIA office and tell you their answers.

BTW: I think greece does not recognise marriages in taiwan. But do not take for granted

If you got married in Greece then yes you will need to have that marriage certificate from Greece authenticated by the Taiwanese embassy (cultural centre as they call it). While you are at it make sure you get your no criminal record and have it authenticated as well.

All the best!

I called NIA office and got answer they are indeed entitled for giving JFRV and their office does not need any paper from my government except criminal record (which i brought with me already).

However since i arrived here in taiwan on visa exempt i do need change to one visa, which duration is over 60 day. Am gonna check more information, and let you guys know how my issue got resolved in the end.

Clearly different government office giving different answer and wife called wrong offices.

quick trip to Hong Kong to apply for a resident visa providing you have all the necessary documents to qualify for the JFRV. I did that back in January and it took the Hong Kong office 48 hrs to issue my resident visa. Upon entry to Taiwan with a resident visa, you must head over to the NIA within 15 days to apply for your ARC.

[quote=“D-nice”]I called NIA office and got answer they are indeed entitled for giving JFRV and their office does not need any paper from my government except criminal record (which i brought with me already).

However since i arrived here in taiwan on visa exempt I do need change to one visa, which duration is over 60 day. Am gonna check more information, and let you guys know how my issue got resolved in the end.

Clearly different government office giving different answer and wife called wrong offices.[/quote]

Good to hear that you could find it out and saved yourself an unnecessary trip to home. We appreciate if you could keep us updated.
Just one piece of advise: You shouldn’t blame you wife for the wrong info. As you could see for yourself, it’s not easy to get the right information in Taiwan, especially if one doesn’t even know where to start looking for it. :2cents:

Not necessarily. Two people sitting next to each other in the same office can give completely different answers to the same question. I’ve also heard the “go back to your country” line from a guy at BOCA, in response to a completely different question. When I spoke with his colleague later, everything was fine. :slight_smile:

[quote=“D-nice”]I called NIA office and got answer they are indeed entitled for giving JFRV and their office does not need any paper from my government except criminal record (which i brought with me already).

However since i arrived here in taiwan on visa exempt I do need change to one visa, which duration is over 60 day. Am gonna check more information, and let you guys know how my issue got resolved in the end.

Clearly different government office giving different answer and wife called wrong offices.[/quote]

I really, really recommend NOT calling. Many things can be misunderstood/forgotten/misinterpreted over the phone. GO to any government office you ar interested in.

BTW, just to stir things up a bit, it just ocurred to me: go to the household Registration Office your wife’s hukou is registered at. Let’s see what can they do for you.

This whole story is pretty strange to me.
I did get married my Taiwanese wife in Taiwan first and everything was just fine with my arc (i got a 5 year permission of stay). They did not ask me anything else beyond the criminal records etc., they did not ask me anything about recognizing my marriage in my home-country. However, I was already living in Taiwan under work visa so i do not know if that makes any difference.
As for Greece, yes, since 2010 does not recognize anything from Taiwan (marriage documents included) as due to the financial crisis had to tighten its relations with China. Simple as that.
OP, your home-country does not have a Taiwan Office there? It makes no sense, to take your home country’s (let’s say X) documents and take them to Taiwan office in another country (let’s say France). The Taiwan office in France there is no freaking way to recognize/stamp official documents from another country.
Something really does not add up in your story. Does your country have an office here in Taiwan?

Just as an aside, don’t blame your wife for “anything” because blaming wife makes wife mad and wife mad makes your life bad :slight_smile:

It sounds to me like you have other issues, such as a) you really don’t understand Taiwan, and the FACT that your wife could easily have gotten the wrong information from a government official in Taiwan; b) you are quick to blame your wife, which suggests some trust issues there in the first place; and c) everything is someone else’s fault. I’m not seeing you even willing to take the time to go to your country’s representative office in Taipei and see if maybe – just maybe – people who’ve been living in Taiwan for years might be right about them being able to authenticate a document for you.

I doubt Mandarin and Taiwan are going to be a good long-term fit for you.

He doesn’t want it to fit. Esta buscandole la quinta pata al gato.

I already told him about toning down the wife blaming. Borderline abuseive if at the start he’s practically calling her an idiot, when the task at hand is a no win situation. Plus, when the Taiwanese woman takes her claws out, it ain’t gonna be pretty. If he thought he’d married a meek, submisive Asian stereotype he’ll be in for a very rude awakening…

Dunno is this is relevant at all but every time I made a visa run, or went to BOCA, MOFA, etc. I was asked for the marriage registration to get a resident visa or resident card, since I got married on USA and not in my Home country. But at NIA they didn’t asked about it, only the police records. But I was doubtful so before starting my police records I made the straight question every time I went for a extension or anything. Do I need to register my marriage in my home country? No, if you are in the household account you are good. But remember: NIA (it was in Nantou) they were telling me that for the first 3 years, that it took for me to get my police records. Also BOCA, MOFA or whatever said they could accept my police records in English, but NIA wanted a notarized Chinese translation, that we did after we got the papers on our own the same day and we only had a public notary to check our stamps and signatures.

Oh yeah and my wife wife screwed me too, every time I was “overthinking” my paperwork before coming to Taiwan she always answered with a smile and a “you are thinking too much, is very easy” and then would proceed to rape me. So I spent 3 years doing visa runs and not been able to work here, now I have a JFRV and ARC and I don’t want to get a job, is all her fault, and I make sure the she-rapist don’t forget about it.

Nice of you guys to blame it all on the wife. First of all, it is a no win situation. Even if she new which questions to ask and where -and she doesn’t, because she is not a foreigner, has never been through the ropes like us, and probably knows no one who has -so even if she the asks in perfect Mandarin, she will get different answers from different officials. Officials are not here to help you. It is in their best interests that you do not settle here. They have enough brown people/foreigners and everyone knows we are not to be trusted, we are not Han. You marry to steal our beloved seeds.

Remember the good ol days when people could only stay if they got married, and foreigners had no working rights? That there was no way a white face could get the green ROC passport? Many people live still in that era, but even then, you could get an ID under the table if you knew the right people. Otherwise, forget it. So give a bit of leeway to your partner, who, raised as a Taiwanese, thinks in giving authority to other people and follows mostly blindly and has no idea to contest or questions the establishment. If her Uncle Hou told her to do X she will do as told. And ask of push at the authorities, being NIA or BOCA? Unthinkable. Most of all, they probably think that if they know Official Wang or Secretary Yu, then they can get things done anyways. If they do not know anyone who can help, then that is a loss of face and hence also a no go.

Moreover, when they settled/visited/worked/stdied in a foreign country, they probably were subject to a standard issue procedure. They may think it is the same all over the world and then blame you for being unreasonable and uncooperative. No fun as a pet anymore.

Finally, yes, it can be a bit of a power play. Maybe they do not really want to help you achieve all your rights because then the balance of power will be upset. Most Taiwanese do have the experience of a foreign partner in the form of a mail order bride, bought and sold almost like cattle and with about the same rights. A disposable womb. Then if they look down on you as a person and as a partner, they will keep you under their foot one way or another. But if that is the case with your relationship, you have bigger problems and you have more urgent things to do than to engage in a childish power struggle. Your future and your soul are at stake here. In that case, I would advise you not to waste a single day and cut your losses/start over. Just make sure you do not leave any children behind.

There lies the problem, you can’t get a JFRV on a landing visa, and I bet that this info was given to you in advance.
When I married in Taiwan (14 years ago) there was no request that the marriage has to be legalized in Germany.
Just went to the German institute and informed them, that was all.

Very strange,
I married in TW 9 years ago, and I had to regrister my marriage in Germany, got that notarized to get my JFRV.

Sidenote:
Even if the procedure is terribly annoying and costy, I think this is the correct way to ensure that there is no bigamy etc.

The government in Taiwan wants to ensure that the marriage is not only recognised under ROC law, but also by the government of the foreign spouse’s home country. This is for the benefit of all parties involved and serves to avoid any legal uncertainty. I do not find this unreasonable. Obviously there are foreign countries and jurisdictions that do not maintain a marriage registry, yet getting a formal written statement from the government in said country confirming this as well as confirming that the foreign government recognises Taiwanese marriages should be a non-issue. For those persons whose government does for some reason not recognise Taiwanese marriages, there is always the possibility of getting married in Hong Kong. There are many ways and solutions - yet blaming Taiwan or the local Taiwanese spouse is probably the worst option.