Goldfish

One of my goldfish died this morning :frowning: Just gave it a burial in the garden.

Before going to bed, it was ‘swimming’ (more like floating) with its belly turned upwards already. It was still alive around 1am, since I saw its eyes roll and its fins move a bit.

I’m not sure why it died, but it may have something to do with the fact I just filled the fishtank almost to the brim ( to give the fish more space to swim in). Normally you can hear the water ventilator pumping in water, but when the tank is full, the vent hole may have been submerged under water and stopped working. Other fish seem alright though, and it was the ‘littlest’ fish that passed away.

Feel guilty that I most likely have something to do with the ‘littlest’ fish’s pre-mature death… Do fish need oxygen in the water to ‘breath’? Did the over-full fishtank run out of air because the water vent was blocked?
:s I’d really like to know if anyone has experienced of this, so it doesn’t happen again!

did you fill it with a lot of tap water?

If you suddenly put a lot of tap water into the fish tank straight from the tap, the chlorine used to kill bacteria will kill you fish too.

Fill a basin with the amount of water you plan to put in your tank 2-3 days before you change the water so the chlorine goes away.

You’re only supposed to change 1/3 of the water every time too.

When your fish keep going to the surface and gulp for air, there isn’t enough oxygen left in the water.

If your goldfish all die, you can try raising guppies. They’re cheap and they don’t die very easily.

Yes.

If the bubbler wasn’t working, then the poor fishy most likely “drowned”. There are only a few species that don’t necessarily need the bubbler - guppies being one of them.

But even guppies don’t last forever. I once killed 5 guppies because I “cleaned” the water with a new coal filter. I suppose there was too much carbon in the water and the oxygen turned into CO, leaving the fishies nothing to breathe.

Of course, sometimes fish just die and you’ll never know what was wrong.

The problem might have been that the water was too high in chlorine.

I use filtered water, a chlorine neutralizer and an additive called Black Water for my tropical fish.

I recently got a larger tank with a filter sysyem that might have been designed by NASA and a seperate air pump (bubbler)

I added too much of the Black Water and killed off 8 of my expensive and much loved fish in two days. I tried seperating the sick ones and putting them back into the old tank with the original water, to no avail: Bubbles, Old Blue, Nemo, Dory, One Eye, Jessica, Liberace and Nixon all caught the porcelain express. Didn’t even have a fish fry afterwards.

Be careful adding this stuff (Black water)- it also tastes terrible so
DO NOT drink this shit.
Get a cheap air pump and cut a small square from a cotton filter and put it underneath this will cut down on the noise of the filter.

I also noticed an improvement in plant growth after using the air pump.

I also have a second small pump that feeds into a decorative aqaurium piece that looks like the skeleton of Jimmy Hoffa chained to cement bags -it bubbles too.

If your house isn’t heated you might want to also get a heater for the tank.

[quote=“lupillus”]did you fill it with a lot of tap water?

If you suddenly put a lot of tap water into the fish tank straight from the tap, the chlorine used to kill bacteria will kill you fish too.

Fill a basin with the amount of water you plan to put in your tank 2-3 days before you change the water so the chlorine goes away.

You’re only supposed to change 1/3 of the water every time too.

When your fish keep going to the surface and gulp for air, there isn’t enough oxygen left in the water.

If your goldfish all die, you can try raising guppies. They’re cheap and they don’t die very easily.[/quote]

When you are pouring the water into the tank DO NOT pour it directly into the tank, put your hand in the tank and pour the water onto your hand and let it trickle in. This prevents trauma to the fish and keeps from bringing up the nasty stuff from the bottom (assuming it is a rock covered bottom)

[quote=“Formosa1984”]One of my goldfish died this morning …

…Feel guilty that I most likely have something to do with the ‘littlest’ fish’s pre-mature death… Do fish need oxygen in the water to ‘breath’? Did the over-full fishtank run out of air because the water vent was blocked?
:s I’d really like to know if anyone has experienced of this, so it doesn’t happen again![/quote]

So, there are other fish in this tank… and they’re still living, right?

I think you need to question the other fish. Did the deceased have any enemies?

[quote=“Formosa1984”]One of my goldfish died this morning :frowning: Just gave it a burial in the garden.

Before going to bed, it was ‘swimming’ (more like floating) with its belly turned upwards already. It was still alive around 1am, since I saw its eyes roll and its fins move a bit.

I’m not sure why it died, but it may have something to do with the fact I just filled the fishtank almost to the brim ( to give the fish more space to swim in). Normally you can hear the water ventilator pumping in water, but when the tank is full, the vent hole may have been submerged under water and stopped working. Other fish seem alright though, and it was the ‘littlest’ fish that passed away.

Feel guilty that I most likely have something to do with the ‘littlest’ fish’s pre-mature death… Do fish need oxygen in the water to ‘breath’? Did the over-full fishtank run out of air because the water vent was blocked?
:s I’d really like to know if anyone has experienced of this, so it doesn’t happen again![/quote]

We would be able to help you a lot more if you gave us some specifics about your tank … how big? number, species and size of fish? … filtration? … how often do you do water changes? … what % of water do you change each time? … what additives do you use each water change?

Let us know…

teggs

[quote=“lupillus”]did you fill it with a lot of tap water?

If you suddenly put a lot of tap water into the fish tank straight from the tap, the chlorine used to kill bacteria will kill you fish too.

Fill a basin with the amount of water you plan to put in your tank 2-3 days before you change the water so the chlorine goes away.[/quote]

Interesting. In the states I had several tanks up to 60 gal w various types of fish including cichlids, which can be a little difficult (mostly because they’re territorial, unlike guppies or goldfish, and often kill each other), so I got the hang of aquariums and did fairly well at keeping them happy and healthy.

Then in Taiwan, my last apartment came with a huge fish tank with several giant bubble-eyed goldfish and they did well under my care. I made sure the filter was running properly, cleaned the glass and changed about 1/3 of the water from time to time. But I never let the water sit as you suggested and it didn’t matter. My past experience has been that fish love a water change, because it removes much of the shitty, toxic water and replaces it with fresh water full of O2. After the turbulence settles down, a few hours after the water change, the water is much clearer and the fish are noticeably more colorful and apparently happy, flitting about energetically. Perhaps with a very large tank, there’s enough of a base of stable, old water that the impact from the new tap water is not so harmful.

But a few months ago I purchased a very small tank and it’s been nothing but trouble. I let the initial water stand for a few days and then started slow, buying only 5 fish, when it seemed the tank could hold a few more. But 3 died, so I scooped them out and bought replacements. Again, a few died, I scooped them out and bought replacements. Finally, I’ve been down to just one fish (a neon tetra) for the past month or so, and I feel very badly for the poor guy. I suspect it is lonely and probably struggling to survive in a toxic environment. To be honest, I’d like to put the fish out of its misery, flush him down the crapper and discard the tiny tank, but I couldn’t kill him when he’s been so strong.

So, I don’t know exactly what the problem is. I suspect it’s largely that the tank is too small. Even though the fish has plenty of room all to itself, I wonder if there’s a certain size of tank that is simply too small to develop the equilibrium of oxygen and organisms in the gravel that eat the shit, etc. And when I do water changes in this tiny tank, perhaps the tap water chemicals are simply too intense. Although I never needed to do so before, I will set water aside in advance for my next water change and see if he seems to be happier. I would imagine the tap water is more toxic in Taiwan than California, but don’t know for sure.

[quote=“Tigerman”]So, there are other fish in this tank… and they’re still living, right?

I think you need to question the other fish. Did the deceased have any enemies?[/quote]According to a lip reader, the goldfish’s last words were “Bob”, I think we would start by talking to him.

You’re right. Smaller tanks are much harder to manage than large ones because the water chemistry changes wildly as the tank settles down. A new tank will experience ammonia and nitrite spikes that will wipe out all your fish in exactly the way you mentioned.
You probably shouldn’t add more fish to the small tank until it has cycled properly (there are test kits for ammonia and nitrite that you can buy at most aquarium shops in Taipei).
It might take up to two months for the beneficial bacteria to build up to such a level that they can support a fully stocked tank. Even then a water change with untreated water can kill all the bacteria and you have to go back to square one again (Taipei tapwater must be treated to get rid of the chloramine).
In Taiwan, you also have the problem of massive temperature swings during summer in a room that is not air-conditioned - for a small tank, this means the water temperature can fluctuate by 5 to 10C a day. This, fish don’t appreciate.

While not everyone has room for them, bigger tanks help to buffer changes in water chemistry and air temperature and will save you a lot of heartache and wasted effort in the long run.

Thanks to everyone for the helpful responses! The other fish are doing well (perhaps happy there’s more room and food to themselves).

My tank is about 30cm3, and had (before the ‘littlest fish’ died) 9 fish in it (each about 10cm long). Not sure if it was overcrowded, but the fish seem to get along well. My family got it as part of the ‘feng shui’ plan for the house (fish and rolling water = prosperity and good luck).

Whenever I clean the tank, I leave about 2/3 of the old water and only use about 1/3 fresh tap water. The tap water I filter first with a Brita filter, and then to the mixture I add about a cap-full of Mayelo Biozyme, which is supposed to remove the cholorine and other chemicals in the tap water, thus making it safer for the fish to live in. I always wait for a few hours to allow the biozyme to do its thing and let the entire mixture settle before I put the fish in.

I’ve had the fish for over 5 years now, and it’s the first time this has happened. So I suspect it was really due to lack of oxygen… Just before the ‘littlest fish’ passed away the other fish were indeed all at the surface as if trying to breath. Perhaps the little one couldn’t get enough space and so died.

Shame I can’t read fish lips though…

[quote=“Formosa1984”]

My tank is about 30cm3, [/quote]

Now this is a big problem… You do realise that 30cm3 is about 3cm x 3cm x 3cm… That’s about the size of two small matchboxes. :s

Oops! :blush: I meant 30x30x30 cm!
Hope no-one warned Animals Taiwan already…

[quote=“Formosa1984”]Oops! :blush: I meant 30x30x30 cm!
Hope no-one warned Animals Taiwan already…[/quote]

It’s still a very small tank for so many fish. It’s only 9 litres of water and that’s enough for maybe 2 goldfish or 5-6 guppies.

Read here:
http://www.tki.org.nz/r/science/caring_for_animals/animal_care/goldfish/index_e.php