Guide for Sustainable Fish in Taiwan

I’m a big seafood eater with 3~4 fish meals per week, but I’d like to eat seafood that is sustainable. With shark fin soup being a frequent meal at Taiwanese weddings, and bluefin tuna in every sushi store, I think it’s pretty obvious that endangered fish is served all over Taiwan. :frowning:

I was able to find a guideline from WWF for buying sustainable seafood, but have had no luck finding a similar guideline for Taiwan. Anyone?

[quote=“elburro”]I’m a big seafood eater with 3~4 fish meals per week, but I’d like to eat seafood that is sustainable. With shark fin soup being a frequent meal at Taiwanese weddings, and bluefin tuna in every sushi store, I think it’s pretty obvious that endangered fish is served all over Taiwan. :frowning:

I was able to find a guideline from WWF for buying sustainable seafood, but have had no luck finding a similar guideline for Taiwan. Anyone?[/quote]
Difficult one. You could always just stick to local aquaculture produce such as milkfish, grouper, tilapia, tiger shrimp, stuff like that, but then of course you’re contributing to the rape of Taiwan’s coastal regions created by those aquaculture ponds and the pollution they cause – not to mention the health aspect of consuming fish fed on god-knows-what kinds of chemical nasties.
I eat a lot of fish too, usually salmon (farmed, imported from Norway, available in Carrefour) and the rest is bought from a wee local man and his Nepalese wife from a morning stall at Bitan. You never know what you’re going to get, but that’s half the fun, and the stuff is ultra-fresh.
More important from your point of view, he only sells line-caught fish. I don’t know if all of them are sustainable or not, but from what I understand, line-caught is considered far more responsible than other fishing methods.

[quote=“sandman”][quote=“elburro”]I’m a big seafood eater with 3~4 fish meals per week, but I’d like to eat seafood that is sustainable. With shark fin soup being a frequent meal at Taiwanese weddings, and bluefin tuna in every sushi store, I think it’s pretty obvious that endangered fish is served all over Taiwan. :frowning:

I was able to find a guideline from WWF for buying sustainable seafood, but have had no luck finding a similar guideline for Taiwan. Anyone?[/quote]
Difficult one. You could always just stick to local aquaculture produce such as milkfish, grouper, tilapia, tiger shrimp, stuff like that, but then of course you’re contributing to the rape of Taiwan’s coastal regions created by those aquaculture ponds and the pollution they cause – not to mention the health aspect of consuming fish fed on god-knows-what kinds of chemical nasties.
I eat a lot of fish too, usually salmon (farmed, imported from Norway, available in Carrefour) and the rest is bought from a wee local man and his Nepalese wife from a morning stall at Bitan. You never know what you’re going to get, but that’s half the fun, and the stuff is ultra-fresh.
More important from your point of view, he only sells line-caught fish. I don’t know if all of them are sustainable or not, but from what I understand, line-caught is considered far more responsible than other fishing methods.[/quote]

Line-caught is generally sustainable as long as it’s not pelagic longline, which Taiwanese fleets are often very guilty of. Pelagic longline has mile-long lines, with 1000s of razorsharp hooks and sits on/near the surface, resulting in sea turtles, seabirds etc becoming unwanted bycatch.

Line-caught means caught by a man fishing with a line of hooks. You’re talking about longlining, which is a different thing altogether. At least as far as I understand.

The oceans resources need to be assessed and policed on a worldwide basis. Longlining needs to go. Dragging nets along the bottom needs to go. Japanese whalers need to go. We need to manage our ocean resources on a worldwide level.

The time is now.

Some of the fish market vendors try to pass off longline as line-caught. At least they do in Australia. Kind of like a lot of the so-called “organic” stuff that’s not.

I trust this guy, I think. He usually only has wee coastal-type fishies, and not many at a time. Never anything like tuna or stuff like that.

At the Taibei Earth Day Market event this weekend there was a fellow who focuses on sustainable fishing named 李嘉亮, head of the 魚飲食文化社會企業, fishculture.com.tw. According to him, the only sustainable ocean-caught fish caught near Taiwan is the Australian mackerel, because by the time they’re a year old, 50-60% (?) of them have already laid eggs by the time they are caught, and his company uses nets with large holes so that all the smaller ones can get out to reproduce.

He also said that mackerel are only good on the day they’re caught, because they get fishy very fast, so as a result his company freezes them immediately rather than selling them fresh, and he says to cook them the moment they thaw for best results.

His phone is 2358-7295; Chinese ony.