High class Chinese/Taiwanese restaurant for elderly parents

My parents are coming to visit and I’ve been tasked with taking them to an upper end Chinese/Taiwanese restaurant. My wife has proffered the following suggestions:

  1. Shin Yeh
  2. The Guest House, Sheraton Grand Hotel
  3. Ya Ge, Mandarin Oriental
  4. Three Coins

I’m not a massive fan of upper end Chinese cuisine. I prefer it cheap and cheerful - IMO that’s what it lends itself to. However, she who must be obeyed has made the call so I have no choice in the matter. Anyone tried any of these places? Any other recommendations?

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I think 雞家莊 is an excellent Taiwanese restaurant for a somewhat fancier occasion. It’s on Changchun Rd in Taipei.

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Oof. Good luck - have your parents had that kind of food before? In my experience the high-end style doesn’t lend itself well to the western palate. When my parents have visited here, they’ve much preferred either Dintaifeng or the rechao places. Once the in-laws took them to a mediumish-range place - it may have been a Shin Yeh, but this was well over a decade back - and my parents quietly told me afterwards they hoped to never eat that kind of food again. Then again, the in-laws ordered, and perhaps we’d have had better results if my wife or I had pushed for different dishes.

Mind you, I’m now thinking I should try Shin Yeh again (or for the first time?): they actually have a decent-looking lunch set that would suit one person (I think?), which is very unusual for good-quality Taiwanese food.

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I’m inclined to agree. If your parents are novices to Chinese cuisine, fancy is not really the way to go.

I still stand by my recommendation, though.

To reiterate: I have no choice in this matter other than to be responsible for the restaurant chosen.

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And, no doubt, to pay. :smiley:

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That goes without saying.

I wouldn’t back down on this one. Your parents, your call. OK, I’d just recommend a fancy Chinese joint but I can’t think of any. I say no to Hsin Yeh though, Taiwanese food is a bit of an extra unwanted step

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The problem with posh Chinese food is you always feel a bit unwell after eating it. It’s a challenge.

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My wife’s come back from her nightly power walk and has decided on Three Coins.

End of thread.

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How about something like 點水樓 at Sogo? Semi upscale, clean, the whole traditional Chinese decor, and they have plenty of dishes that westerners like. It was a big hit with my cousins when they invaded Taiwan last year.

Edit: Or how about Three Coins?

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Yes. I understand your wife’s desire to treat them to the best food available, but it’s not really fair to them if they don’t actually know how to enjoy the food. Definitely better to just take them somewhere you know they’ll be able to enjoy.

Let us know how Three Coins goes! Good luck.

I wish I had access to more of the Japanese-language and Korean-language reviews. I trust them to have a better sense of what’s actually good here than the English-language reviews.

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The upper end hotels usually have decent food. San Want Hotel’s Cantonese restaurant is good. I forget the name…I think it’s on the second floor? And if your parents like or are willing to try Japanese food, the Japanese restaurant on B1 of Brother Hotel is also nice.

It’s as wedding banquety as I thought it might be.

Oh, well. What else can be done? That’s what posh Chinese food is.

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I already feel mildly nauseous looking at the photos of the dishes.

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Yeah, at one point I was just doing an image search to see if any of the restaurants looked marginally better than the others.

It didn’t help. At all. I think too many weddings have given me a Pavlovian cringe upon seeing that style of decor.

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My parents have been to Japan and enjoyed Japanese food. The problem I have is trying to source Chinese food that my wife will consider to be Michelin star quality while at the same time my parents will like. I’m not sure that it’s possible and it will end up being a disappointing night out where I will have to manage things.

That’s a bit…unfairly difficult.

Maybe you could take them to a really nice teppanyaki. That’s always a crowd pleaser.

It’s not Chinese/Taiwanese.

Look, I know what I’m asking for here is a seriously big ask. There probably isn’t a solution.