High school options for non-millionaire expats?

I’m with you on this, ChoDoFu. The kindergarten where my boy goes has agreed to let him stay on a bit longer, spending the mornings in the da ban, then moving to the an ching ban in the afternoon.

My biggest fear about public schools here isn’t the education, it’s the fact that he’s a blonde haired blue-eyed boy going to a school where he’ll be the only one. The kindergarten he’s at spent a good deal of time acclimating him to the school and the other kids to him. However, with the class sizes at a public school I certainly don’t expect them to make that sort of effort. Children are all about picking on the weak, different, etc. (at least they were when I went to school) and I don’t want to expose my boy to that sort of experience, if I can at all avoid it.

Toughen the lad up a bit. It’ll be good for him.

Brian

ahem I’m going to take that comment as being tongue-in-cheek. There is time enough in his life to learn that people can be bigoted a**holes without tossing him into it at such an early age.

[quote=“Muffin”]Chessman

No thats not true. My son attended the local primary school. All you wife needs is to take her household registration down to the school with your ARC, your Sons ARC and enrol.

My sone does not have ROC nationalty but just graduated from 6th grade at a local school.

It’s pretty funny how all these things are being said about TAS. Yes, I attended TAS for high school, but before that I was born and raised in California.

It’s true that the main student population are rich, but this is natural considering that most of the students parent’s went to the US to get an education, probably lived there for a few years, then moved back to Taiwan for business opportunities.

TAS does have a lot of naive, spoiled, closed minded children. However, I made the best of friends there, as well as an international perspective. The tuition is quite expensive- but all american schools, SAS, ISM, HKIS, etc are higher I have heard.

TAS was started back in late 1940’s for US soldiers.

It’s immature, and naive on everyones part to say such negative things about a school based on its tuition- or the fact that yes, many rich american born chinese students attend the school.

I have had several of my students go on to TAS from my buxiban class. I’m expecting to lose one more to them after this year. I can’t speak as a student or as a parent, but from the times I have spent there during early childhood educators meetings held in the lower school, and knowing my former students who are attending school there, I feel that the school and its teachers are very competent and excellent at what they do. From what I understand of the basic requirements to even be a potential candidate, I can see why. TAS, unless I am mistaken, asks for no less than two years teaching experience in an American school in the States and encourages candidates to have at least one year experience abroad. I don’t know for sure since I have no experience with the personnel department, but of the two teachers who went on to teach there from my school, they were both great teachers with strong credentials and experience.
Their resources, materials, facilities and services (especially with ESL and special ed.) are amazing. And to get not only such an excellent American school, but an excellent American school on another continent takes moola. The kids that moved on were more or less kids that a teacher would love to have in his or her class, all intrinsically motivated in their education, funny, well-rounded, very smart, and pretty good speakers of English. I have two in my kindergarten class who I am sure are already being groomed to join the TAS student body when they get into elementary school. I do recall that my first time going into there, I overheard two mothers bragging in a one-upmanship manner about what Ivy League school their kids had gotten into for the next year. They were talking casually, but you could just hear the competetitive tone in their voices, although I’m sure that they were also proud of their children and not just treating them as trophies of their parenting skills.

As far as TAS’s mission showing bias in favor of rich local families, I think someone needs to work on their reading skills:

[quote=“Taipei American School’s historical perspective on admissions”]Taipei American School (TAS) was established in 1949 to educate children of expatriates. TAS is an educational institution owned and operated by the Taipei American School Foundation for the education of children of foreign businessmen, technicians, scholars, missionaries and other foreigners in Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China in accordance with American educational concepts. Taipei American School enrolls students without regard to race, religion or gender.

TAS receives more applications than it has space available and therefore has initiated a priority system that reflects the school

[quote=“chodofu”]Kids 6 and 4, and I am so sad. I’ve read every single page of this thread and it seems that my only solution is to go out and be a money mongering whore for the next 8 years… or leave Taiwan and live in a North Carolina trailer park near Alien.

Chou[/quote]

Don’t be sad.

There’re more and more public English/Chinese elementary schools in Taipei.

Public elementary school like XinSheng elementary school should be good for your children. And it should be cheap.

http://www.snes.tp.edu.tw/

Application Policy for the Bilingual Education ClassAt Taipei Municipal NanGang District NanGang Elementary School-For Children of foreigners and return scholars working at Academia Sinica,NanKang Software Park, or NeiHu Technology Park
http://www.sinica.edu.tw/~hro/IS/Education.pdf

http://www.stes.tp.edu.tw/english/englishindex.html

I would really not recommend Hsintien (Xindian) Cambridge for your kids. The school is not bilingual, as they claim to be. They have 2 classes of English per day but all their regular classes, such as math, science, etc. are all taught in Chinese.

The majority of their teachers are made up of foreigners who have some teaching experience but do not hold teacher licenses, which they should as they are a registered school. They are regulated as regular Chinese elementary schools are, so all their teachers are all suppose to have teaching licenses - they work around it. The teacher turn over rate is incredibly high as they have major management issues and their pay is lower than buxhibans/anchingban (considering the hours they are supposed to teach).

The kids are usually from wealthy families that reside on the Xindian mountain. You’ll find the usual snotty kids, but that’ll be the same everywhere. The problem is, their English is poor, especially the pronunciation, because they learned it in Taiwan and they are all Taiwanese. This is a school for rich Taiwanese kids that have rich Taiwanese parents who want to brag about their expensive school. They do plan to send their kids abroad for University but will eventually find that, since their English is so poor, the kids will run into quite a lot of problems getting/fitting in.

The Chinese teachers are actually teachers that have their teaching degrees and are pretty good.

Also, the spaces are very limited as most of their students start attending since kindergarden and have priority.

This information coming from teachers currently teaching there or have taught at Cambridge.

I have attended Dominican School a while back and in my class of 25, I was the only student there that was comfortable conversing in English. The rest of the class had poor pronunciation and was all Taiwanese. They had travelled abroad and some had lived there for a year or two but was mainly rich Taiwanese kids that started attending Dominican since they were in kindergarden. So, actually, my Chinese improved, even though all of the classes were taught in English, albeit by heavily accented Philipino nuns.

No wonder my classmates all sounded slightly Philipino and were all prudes. :smiling_imp:

As for the education, it was ok. Nothing special. Competitive. They used to rank all the students and post that up in front of the class. I don’t really know if you want your kids to go through that kind of pressure. Back then, I had private tutoring after school and my life was basically all studying. There were no sports teams or after curricular activities.

omg, i just checked,

Required and Nonrefundable Fees Per Year
Initial Application Fee NT$ 10,000
Application Update Fee (application not accepted previous year) NT$ 5,000
Registration Fee NT$ 25,000
Capital Fee (one-time fee only) NT$ 120,000
Alternative Education Fee (middle school students only) NT$ 7,000
Required Tuition and Fees Per Semester
Tuition
Grades KA~5 NT$ 167,600
Grades 6~12 NT$ 186,000

so…for 1 yr to send a kid to TAS it would cost (not including the one time costs)…
10,000NT
25,000NT
186,000NT
(assuming gr. 6-12) which is where I think the Chinese skule system is severely lacking…

OMG!

$221,000NT thats quite unreasonable for a single year of schooling for a single child. I think the tuition alone will filter how many ppl can send their kids there :s

I heard TAS is good but…YIKEZ…thats just mindboggling…

Or about $16,000+ USD as I posted above. By the way, I have heard that the tuition will be raised to make up for the lagging US dollar.

um…ya but I looked at the $16,000 USD number U mentioned, but $221,000NT is only half of that so thought your numbers seemed too high. Unless when they say per semester they mean sep-jan, jan-jun sessions so for your kid to spend an actual year doing say grade 9 it would cost $442,000NT, a.k.a. omg, almost $16k after transporation and food costs omg!

Er… I’m speechless, thats ridiculous, what expat can afford that? Thats like my yearly after tax income…is this skule for american expatriates or american diplomats?!

:fume:

Such tuition is an unreasonable hardship for expats considering the lack of viable alternatives for reasonable quality education. I don’t expect the skule to change its fees since its a free market but… I’d think twice before having a kid in TW :frowning:

A mate of ours runs a Montessori preschool in Banqiao. That’s where our kids will go (when they arrive), up to the age of 6.

After that, we’ll be looking for a quality Montessori elementary. Any ideas where we might find one? If not, we’ll settle for a good local elementary.

[quote=“webdoctors”]um…ya but I looked at the $16,000 USD number U mentioned, but $221,000NT is only half of that so thought your numbers seemed too high. Unless when they say per semester they mean sep-jan, jan-jun sessions so for your kid to spend an actual year doing say grade 9 it would cost $442,000NT, a.k.a. omg, almost $16k after transporation and food costs omg!

Er… I’m speechless, thats ridiculous, what expat can afford that? Thats like my yearly after tax income…is this skule for American expatriates or American diplomats?!

:fume:

Such tuition is an unreasonable hardship for expats considering the lack of viable alternatives for reasonable quality education. I don’t expect the skule to change its fees since its a free market but… I’d think twice before having a kid in TW :frowning:[/quote]
Yep, that’s outrageous!!

[quote=“Fortigurn”]A mate of ours runs a Montessori preschool in Banqiao. That’s where our kids will go (when they arrive), up to the age of 6.

After that, we’ll be looking for a quality Montessori elementary. Any ideas where we might find one? If not, we’ll settle for a good local elementary.[/quote]

I don’t believe there are any Montessori elementary schools here or I’m sure my friends and I would have found it by now.

However I have heard of some alternative (slightly alternative?) public and private schools. I will start another topic about it as I am hoping I can find people who could share information about some of these schools.

[quote=“braxtonhicks”][quote=“Fortigurn”]A mate of ours runs a Montessori preschool in Banqiao. That’s where our kids will go (when they arrive), up to the age of 6.

After that, we’ll be looking for a quality Montessori elementary. Any ideas where we might find one? If not, we’ll settle for a good local elementary.[/quote]

I don’t believe there are any Montessori elementary schools here or I’m sure my friends and I would have found it by now.[/quote]

I do know there’s a Montessori school about 3 doors down from my wife’s work, but I don’t know if they’re elementary or senior high (they certainly aren’t pre-school). I’ve been surprised at how many Montessori schools there are in Taiwan.

Thanks. :slight_smile:

I learned something new today. I thought there were only a few “true” Montessori schools in Taipei but according to this website schools may call themselves Montessori schools if there are Montessori-certified teachers.

There’s also a directory of international schools. Just choose ‘Taiwan’ and hit ‘Search’ and you’ll get the full listing. I remember doing a search about 4 years ago and only finding two certified schools in Taipei.

Helpful info on this page too about choosing a school, what to look for in a Montessori school

[quote=“braxtonhicks”]I learned something new today. I thought there were only a few “true” Montessori schools in Taipei but according to this website schools may call themselves Montessori schools if there are Montessori-certified teachers.

There’s also a directory of international schools. Just choose ‘Taiwan’ and hit ‘Search’ and you’ll get the full listing. I remember doing a search about 4 years ago and only finding two certified schools in Taipei.

Helpful info on this page too about choosing a school, what to look for in a Montessori school[/quote]

Aha, thanks. I am thinking seriously of becoming Montessori certified, though it’s an expensive business. :astonished:

[quote=“cybertai”]

Don’t be sad.

There’re more and more public English/Chinese elementary schools in Taipei.

Public elementary school like Xinsheng elementary school should be good for your children. And it should be cheap.

http://www.snes.tp.edu.tw/

Application Policy for the Bilingual Education ClassAt Taipei Municipal NanGang District NanGang Elementary School-For Children of foreigners and return scholars working at Academia Sinica,Nankang (Nangang) Software Park, or Neihu Technology Park
http://www.sinica.edu.tw/~hro/IS/Education.pdf

http://www.stes.tp.edu.tw/English/englishindex.html[/quote]

anyone attending such schools or have more information about them?

Tigerman, I’m planning on home schooling <mwwwaaaahahahahaha…and he thinks his Chinese teachers are tough> for a number of reasons. I’ve heard of a number of people who have done it, and have done a bit of research into it (errr, the other part is that he’s gonna have a camera shoved in his hands for “vocational” education)…

Check here:

tas.edu.tw/admissions/tuition.html

We are soon to deal with this headache of a problem. I’m not certain what we will do for our boy when he gets to middle school. But I’m pretty certain we will send him back to my parents to live when he gets to high school so that he can attend the same high school that I did… at least for one, maybe two years… he’ll be kinda like an exchange student… but not exactly.

As for middle school, we are looking at the British School and even Bethany. But these are not much less expensive than TAS. :cry:[/quote]

Creative and tallented are the operative words. I have been teaching kids out here in the boonies (where my kid needs to attend school) and those are two words I almost never use (Taipei is probably different)…the simple fact is that by the end of Jr. High, the kids have had ANY creativity that was left after the grade school beatings completely beaten out of them.

Keeping a child who is NOT required to be there in Taiwanese schools after grade school is something that needs to be SERIOUSLY thought about if creativity and initiative are important to the child…AGAIN, there ARE exceptions, there is a school in Hsinchu whose name is escaping me (not the Bilingual School in Science Park) that is supposed to be trying some incredible things (and I may look at it for Jr. High, but my feeling is that it is still part of a basic system that discourages creativity)…(errrm and the system doesn’t have TIME to encourage creativity, the memorization required for Chinese characters kinda takes up a lot of effort, so no, I’m not bashing…and YES, I wish I had a useful suggestion to send to someone on how to fix the problem)…

[quote=“Alien”][quote=“Holger Nygaard”] What I have heard is that it has more than its fair share of spoiled brats chauffeured to school. Do you want your kid to have that kind of class-mates?
.[/quote]

I think this is an unfair assumption. There are plenty of rich kid brats in the Taiwan public school system too, so why would TAS be much different??

In fact, I am sure that your child would receive a superior education at TAS which would prepare him or her for the multicultural world.
Having had the opportunity to work on several projects side-by-side with various aged children from TAS (expat kids and kids of Taiwanese background), I’d say that these kids are generally a creative, talented, open-minded and well-educated group.
If you can get the money together, do look into sending your child to that school. The education they’d receive there would serve them well throughout their lives.

ps>I have no affiliation with the school. My opinions were reached through observation alone.[/quote]