Himalayan Salt & Honey

Hey all,

is it easy to purchase 1) Himalayan Salt and 2)Honey in Taiwan especially in the more rural districts eg Taidong, Hualien and Nantou?

Really appreciate your input here.

Thanks

How does that buddhist mantra go?

Om padme sodi hum?

Its as if the Dalai Lamma himself was trolling our forums.

Tomorrow’s question: anyone know where I can by instant enlightenment in Sanchong on a rainy Thursday?

You would probably need to find an Indo-Pak grocery store or restaurant to have any reasonable chance of sucess of finding them. You might also try organic food stores. But if you really want them, I suggest mail order from outside Taiwan.

[quote=“Budda Boy”]Hey all,

is it easy to purchase 1) Himalayan Salt and 2)Honey in Taiwan especially in the more rural districts eg Taidong, Hualian and Nantou?

Really appreciate your input here.

Thanks[/quote]

Well you could always go to Himalayan Salt and Honey City, which is a chain store with branches in most major Taiwanese towns. But it’s a bit like the McDonalds of the Himalayan salt and honey vending industry, cheap and ubiquitous but the quality is not that high.

They split off from Shangri-La Salt and Honey when it was discovered Shangri-La doesn’t exist except as a Chinese theme park for gullible tourists.

But Buddha boy is having a good troll session on everybody’s behalf. Next he’ll be looking for Dominos delivery to his cave door.

I dont even think there is such a thing as himalayan salt is there?

OH ok, here i go, i just answered my own question:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himalayan_salt

its actually pakistani from a certain salt mine, with its own characteristics.

so normal Sea Salt wont do I guess. But like other salts it can cause hypertension.

Sorta like putting a whore in another whorehouse… still a whore?

Uh, well maybe not the best metaphor.

Hey, I’ve seen Himalayan salt and honey around a lot. I was at Jason’s in 101 just the other day and saw it. But my local small supermarkets all sell Himalayan salt (I live in Taoyuan) and I haven’t looked for honey but I can’t imagine it’ll be a problem.

The only place I’ve seen rock salt in a grinder is in the organic stores and where I’m living they’re quite plentiful.

Hope this helps.

[quote=“Staceycolleena”]Hey, I’ve seen Himalayan salt and honey around a lot. I was at Jason’s in 101 just the other day and saw it. But my local small supermarkets all sell Himalayan salt (I live in Taoyuan) and I haven’t looked for honey but I can’t imagine it’ll be a problem.

The only place I’ve seen rock salt in a grinder is in the organic stores and where I’m living they’re quite plentiful.

Hope this helps.[/quote]

Thanks Stacey. I am glad someone else in this forum knows about the merits of Himalayan salt.

If you drink 1.5 L of Himalayan Salt Water flush every morning, your appetite for food decrease and the salt water flush cleanse your system as well. So it is a really useful tool for those looking to lose weight and cleanse their bodies of the pollutants normally found in supermarket foods.

Also honey and hot water is a good food substitute for those looking to fast.

What do the taiwanese call organic stores in chinese?

Costco sells great Himalayan Salt
They also have some really nice raw honey

I’m not sure what they call organic stores. I can’t read Chinese. But they all say organic in English. In NZ we don’t really get enough iodine in our diets so Himalayan salt is good for that too. I’ve never heard of drinking 1.5l of it in water though but it does make sense. Does that not make your sodium levels go crazy though?

A lot of people swear by it and the way I see it is if I’m gonna use salt I may as well use one that is just as good for me as it is bad.

That sounds like an awful lot.

“Organic” is 有機. You’d want a 有機超市.

BTW, are you looking for 1: Himalayan salt and 2: Any old honey; or 1: Himalayan salt and 2: Himalayan honey?

They sell Himalyan salt at my local Wellcome. I happened to see it today in the salt section, next to the baked beans. I’m in the middle of nowhere, so other Wellcomes must stock it, too. It was about TWS90 for a small, square jar.

OP. I remembered this thread when I saw some “Himalayan Pink Salt” at Costco Neihu. It’s 368.5 grams for NT 139. It’s not ground and It’s in its own self contained grinder.

It’s called ‘fasting’ if you dissolve sugar in water and drink it? Why not just have juice? Or Super Supau instead? It’d be less unhealthy because it’d replace the electrolytes lost by sweating?

The OP didn’t ask for a critique but I’m pretty supau is loaded with high fructose corn syrup and who knows what else. Even if I liked the taste (which I despise) Supau isn’t a great alternative although I don’t care for fasting or body cleansing myself. I have switched to a tbsp of apple cider vinegar and honey (per glass of water) at home and for exercise. 1.5L in the morning is a lot but to each their own.

Honey is fructose too. With spores in it.

Perhaps high fructose corn syrup doesn’t bother you but the OP specifically asked about Himalayan honey and probably isn’t interested in settling for Supau.

Perhaps high fructose corn syrup doesn’t bother you but the OP specifically asked about Himalayan honey and probably isn’t interested in settling for Supau.[/quote]

I understand, I’m just pointing out that its not healthy for him to ingest nothing but sodium and a few trace minerals, fructose, sucrose and spores. Of course I don’t eat high fructose cornsyrup, but I’m also not planning to fuck myself up by fasting on unconcern treated fructose either. Supau would give him less of a headache for his meditation because it would be more nutritious. You are correct, it would be very unhealthy to settle for Supau, but if he’s going to ‘fast’ (I’m assuming he means eating nothing else because fasting has a variety of levels of restriction under it’s umbrella), he needs to take care of himself.

Of course, he’s a stranger and I shouldn’t give a fuck, I know.

Yes Rock Salt is so beneficiary for us while in high snow falling area rather than in kitchen! :bow: