Honduras Migrants on their way


#61

The same govt that doesn’t give a shit in the first place and is controlled by landed elites and gangsters ?


#62

They don’t give a shit about the problem, but they do give a shit about losing their free money.


#63

How much we talking about here ?


#64

They didn’t, they came to open expand business and benefit the economy. An actual benefit to all parties involved.

It’s unfair in some ways but you have an opportunity to make things better and there’s some honor in that. If I grew up in the ghetto projects don’t mean my parents can send me over to the nice neighborhood next town over.


#65

Well, probably ought to point out that this argument was proven to be less than persuasive when used by US citizens who’ve squatted in homes or have stopped paying their mortgages or who have tried to rent a room in a motel without paying or to rent a house for $0 anywhere in the US.

I just don’t understand why we Americans have to allow non-citizens to have more rights then we allow our own citizens.

Not having enough money rarely excuses anything in the US.


#66

Really they came to ‘expand the economy’? Nobody emigrates for such an obtuse idea!


#67

Non citizens don’t have more rights than citizens, they have almost no rights. What are you waffling about ?


#68

Turn on your reading comprehension and reread my post.

“They don’t have enough money to immigrate legally” would not be a valid reason for US citizens to migrate to Mexico or Canada or anywhere else. It’s also true that not having enough money won’t buy or rent a US citizen a house.

Not sure why it should work, then, for non-citizens.


#69

Im reading it , you are saying non citizens have the same or more rights than citizens. That’s absurd.


#70

I said expand business which benefits the economy, in exchange for residency and citizenship. It makes no sense to just take in people that can’t contribute, some cases like political refugees yes. But they have to go through a process. And there is one.


#71

$500 million to Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador in 2017…certainly enough to line quite a few pockets.


#72

Far too little , especially if spread across multiple states.

Anyway the US will have to take a more direct approach in those corrupt countries or else it will just continue as it is. Eventually it will be able to seal off the borders almost completely but there will be a lot of instability in the region.


#73

Are you saying migrants don’t work for money?
Cos all the legal and illegal migrants I met in the US sure didn’t work for free. They also had to pay their rent on time or they were out on the street. Who do you think does the farming and landscaping …


#74

Depends on how many palms are being greased. But it’s true that there are no easy solutions. Honduras is basically a failed state at this point.


#75

Open southern border = importing instability. There is no amount of foreign aid thrown at the problem that will solve instability in Mexico or Central or South America. The problems there are internal and their leadership know it.

Andrew raises a good point. Why should able-bodied males be supported if they choose to migrate illegally rather than stay home and fix their own problems?


#76

No.


#77

That’s a lot of burden placed on the US. Taking in people, fix their government, give stability during conflict. And then get shit for doing it after?


#78

Even able bodied females. If your whole countrys mentality is it’s shit here, I can’t do nothing, let’s just go over to a better country illegally. I don’t think things will improve for them. Maybe things will not be amazing for their generation, but the hope for the next is what sustains most people. Is it always fair, no. But there honor in making things better.


#79

I agree. Problem is made even worse by allowing illegals in and employing them illegally as we’ve done for decades now.

Guy (or gal) in Venezuela looks at his country going to shit, remembers that you can break into the US and get a job anyway, and takes the easy (easier) way out.

That’s why immigration reform is so crucial. Putting it off just makes the problem snowball. What we have now is unsustainable, and it is destroying the rule of law in the US.


#80

Same in Venezuela or latin America: men are strong enough to work in the sectors they are needed and usually do not dfrag teh kids along unless they are aloso strong enough to work. Men send teh money back to their families which usually include several generations. It si harder for women to do the hike and anlso find employment and they rarely leave the kids behind so they are usually slower with smaller kids, mostly littel girls, more vulnerable to dangers both at home or on the road.

Guess not all of Europe is hiring nor employing people for manual intensive labor as much as the US.