How hard is it for a U.S. high school graduate to teach English in Taiwan?

After completing HS in the States, I came back to Taiwan to complete my conscription.
It’ll take at least four months before I could enter service, so I sought after working in education. (perhaps in cram schools as a “課輔.”)

The chances of me finding a teaching job as an 18-year-old with no teaching license and formal experience are slim… Still, I worked with kids with disabilities as a substitute for a year.

I assume that most of you here know a few things relating to English education, should I take my chances and apply? or work at 7-11?

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You have a local ID card?

You’re 18? I will assume, given Taiwan’s historical racial make-up, that you are ethnically Asian? I don’t know what cram school requirements are for Taiwanese citizens, but foreigners need at least an undergrad degree to get a work permit. It’s possible you can get a desk job or be a teaching assistant, but I think most cram school employees are, at minimum, currently in college/Uni or graduated.

You will also, if not white, run into the issue that potential employers probably don’t care if you’re a native English speaker, because your face doesn’t work well from an advertising standpoint. I know of a school in Taipei that hired the white, American husbands of Taiwanese women who had already worked in the school for years (and who had attended high school through Uni and up in the US) and then told the women they could go be office slaves or pound rocks instead of renewing their contracts. The school was very proud to brag that they “have at least one American teacher in each classroom”, even though the other (not husband) foreign teachers were from non-English European countries. It’s ALL about appearences

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Yea, basically they don’t care about actual teaching ability, just the appearance of being a teacher.

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Yes, I’m a dual citizen.
Judging from the other comments here, I’m guessing that I’d only get a desk job at a cram school at best.

Go with 7-11 then. You’d get about the same wage, but I’d assume 7-11 would also get you healthcare, which can be hit or miss at a cram school for assistants

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I’m not so sure. It’s entirely possible to be too negative about these things, and I think the posters above may be edging that way. It may not be easy, but I’d certainly try. It’s not like it hasn’t been done before. If you have teaching skill, it will be seen by some at least. Who knows, with the way things are today and some amount of paranoia about foreign faces here, it might be the right moment. The main issue is the 4 month time frame if I’m reading you right? That might make things hard for anyone.

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On a related note, is it easy to score a job at a convenience store now? I know a kid still in high school earning over 30K a month in one. It seems lots of adults would be satisfied with that too. It’s not like the US where they can’t get people to take these jobs.

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The demand is always higher, but I think it’s similar here… I heard uni grads in Taiwan would rather run foodpanda trips at 4 in the morning than clean toilets.
I dreamt of opening a coffee shop and wanted to apply as an intern in a Starbucks near my area, but if you could get 30k working part-time in a 7-11, then I might as well take my chances.

Starbucks has pretty good benefits actually. Maybe a little more pay than 7-11? I know a lot of people with college degrees who really like the “family” they developed among their colleagues. For some reason I feel like someone told me Starbucks TW requires a college diploma though. Never hurts to apply. Learning how to make fancy* coffees could be fun. Your English proficiency would be incredibly valuable as well.

*”fancy” here being the various sugar drinks that Starbucks sells. Might need to work at a different coffee shop if you want to pour different kids of fancy coffee

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If you have a local ID and are a native English speaker, you might be able to get a gig as a babysitter, nanny, or tutor. I think in theory you maybe are supposed to have certain training to be a nanny, and as a foreigner I probably wouldn’t risk working in the grey market, but it’s probably legal for you and the pay might be better. Folk here are often looking for this type of help.

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