How long is one allowed to study Chinese in Taiwan?

I’m getting conflicting information on this question. My teacher at Tamkang’s language department says a student can study Chinese for three years. Some other students at different schools (Shi Da, for one) say only two years. When I got to Taiwan, my first teacher told me that one could stay indefinitely, as long as one kept changing schools, and that she knew a Japanese guy who had been here over 10 years doing just that. I don’t know what to believe.

My goal is to attend university here, but I feel I need at least one more year of language study before I do that. I want to pursue a degree in Chinese language (although at times I think I should just enroll in the English department and breeze through classes, ha), and I hope to eventually work as a translator, maybe an English teacher, not sure.

I arrived March 21, 2005. I studied Chinese at CLD Perfect through May 28, when they got kicked off the government’s list. I took a six-month break from studying and just left Taiwan once a month, so during that time I had no visa, no ARC. I got a new visa in November 2006 and am now studying at Tamkang, and I will apply for a new ARC in March. Will the government consider that I only began studying in November 2006 and start counting time from that date, or will they add in the one year plus that I had before?

I’m not sure if I will need to apply to Tamkang University by the April 30 deadline, or if I will be able to continue my Chinese studies throughout 2007 and apply at Tamkang next year. I suppose I’ll be OK in classes if I have to start earlier than I wanted, since many are taught in English, but I’d surely prefer to wait until I feel more comfortable with Chinese. I still suck at understanding when people talk to me.

Advice from those of you who have been in Taiwan for many years will be truly appreciated, as well as those of you who are newly arrived and may have picked up current information in the process of getting your visas.

I’ve met people that studied here for longer than 3 years and I guess the trick is changing universities every 3 years … as long as you can prove sufficient funding they’ll allow you studying in Taiwan …

[quote=“500CBFan”]I’m getting conflicting information on this question. My teacher at Tamkang’s language department says a student can study Chinese for three years. Some other students at different schools (Shi-Da, for one) say only two years. When I got to Taiwan, my first teacher told me that one could stay indefinitely, as long as one kept changing schools, and that she knew a Japanese guy who had been here over 10 years doing just that. I don’t know what to believe.[/quote]I remember reading a on Forumosa a while back that the regulations had been changed and two years was the maximum. Presumably this was to try and prevent people from staying here for years and years, ostensibly studying Chinese but really just working. However, if implemented, the regulations would also prevent most people from attaining a decent level of Chinese. Typical shortsightedness.

Anyway, I’m not sure whether Chinese study is still limited to two years (and, if so, whether there are workarounds). Hopefully someone saw sense and made the regulations more reasonable.

So true. When I was applying for the visa in Hong Kong, I had to go through the third degree. The woman informed me that I’d already studied “long enough.” One year of Chinese study is enough? Not hardly, at least not in two hours a day, five days a week! I feel as if I’ve barely scratched the surface.

If two years is truly the maximum, I think there may be more people choosing to go to the mainland to study in the future, and that’s a damned shame.

When I went to the new immigration office to renew my ARC (Feb 2007), the lady told me that you can study at an APPROVED language school for three years, counting from the day you actually received your ARC. I started at Shi Da in Sept 2005, but got my ARC in April 2006. According to her, I can study there until April 2009 (actually until February because that would be the last semester and I can’t extend past 3 years…the next semester would be from March-May 2009).

She gave me a very detailed explannation of how they count the time, but I have been told other things, as well. This is a new office, so I would not take anything I say as law. I ask them everytime that I go and this is the first time they said this, but it is a new office. My suggestion, very politely ask and ask again.

Ah, the infamous Dragon Lady!!

I was told (at TLI) that you could study at a language school for only two years. After that they expected your Chinese to be good enough to enter a university - not a language school at a university, but an actual university, taking the same classes as Taiwanese students. You could study at the university as long as you wanted, it seems.
This seems ridiculous to me - I’m sure the average native speaker of English is not going to be good enough at Chinese after two years of study at TLI or Shida to take real university classes.

Yes. And if they take a hard look at the statistics from their scholarship programs for foreign students (the banana-republic ones for language training plus MA program) they’ll see that most cannot hack it after a year of Chinese (which is what they get on those programs.)

I’d like to see a Taiwanese student starting with zero English get along in any American university, no matter how lame, after two years of classes in a cram school environment.

The other thing, of course, is that the government has evidently decided that there is only one reason to learn Chinese well – to go to a Taiwanese university – and any other purpose should be achievable within two or three years. Good luck with that. But of course we don’t need native English speaking translators anyway because (according to the work laws) that’s a job the Taiwanese can do just as well as a foreigner. :help:

Ahem, just marry a Taiwanese and you can study for life. :laughing:

So true. When I was applying for the visa in Hong Kong, I had to go through the third degree. The woman informed me that I’d already studied “long enough.” One year of Chinese study is enough? Not hardly, at least not in two hours a day, five days a week! I feel as if I’ve barely scratched the surface.

If two years is truly the maximum, I think there may be more people choosing to go to the mainland to study in the future, and that’s a damned shame.[/quote]

I’ll never forget those bitches in the HK visa office. All I can say is, that she must not have had a shag for a very long time.

Bit excessive, no?

ah-ha … just like what you will be doing eh? :smiley:

Bit excessive, no?[/quote]

You think Buttercup?

Silly Bunnie I don’t accept your comment as we are clearly marrying so that C can get a UK passport. :raspberry: Oh and if anyone tells her I posted this I will have to kill you! :smiley:

[quote=“Edgar Allen”]
Oh and if anyone tells her I posted this I will have to kill you! :smiley:[/quote]

It would surely not be me, I am not R***** :wink: