How much does it cost to build a hut in the mountains?

There are some lamas who will be cultivating and meditating in the mountains here in Taiwan, most probably in the southern mountains as the northern mountains are too cold and too crowded.

They are asking me how much does it cost to build a one-man hut in the mountains far away from the masses?

During their meditation/spiritual training, they will be eating very little food. Raw vegetables, raw fruits, liquid juice as such. There will be very little cooked foods in their diet, unless you count boiled vegetable soups without any spices or seasoning whatsoever as cooked foods.

They may or may not install solar panels depending on the prices of such installation. No tv, no radios, no internet, no modern conveniences will be installed in the hut. However, they may use their laptop to read and study some religious sutras or even listen to mp3s of other lamas teaching or chanting prayers so this is the main reason for installing the solar panel(s). Otherwise, there wouldn’t even be a need to install such solar panels.

Toiletry needs? Ummm… i heard that they will be fasting frequently … they may eat only one or two or three meals a week so there wouldn’t be any major amounts of solid wastes, they will be drinking plenty of water though and being male, they can always do their businesses in the bushes…

Question here is… how much does it cost to build such a simple hut in the mountains? what about permits and such?

I could have posted this in the real estate forum, but the lamas wanted me to find out the relevant pricing quickly so i am just putting this thread up in the hopes of getting some honest feelers.

I wouldn’t bother building. Just go rent a place. Lots of places in the mountains. Shouldn’t be more than a few thousand a month.

MM, the lamas wanted some huts far away from the masses… isn’t it true that taiwanese houses are built side by side… even those houses in the mountains?.. i may be wrong about this but i will appreciate your advice…

No. There are lots of houses in rural areas that are way up the mountains on their own. Many of these are owned by aboriginals. In many cases the person works or lives in the city so the house just sits there all by itself. I have friends who run a B&B in Dulan that is a 15 minute drive up a mountain. There is one house just down the road but beyond that nothing.

The best place to look would be Hualien and Taitung Counties for the price. But even around Taipei there are so many places in the mountains at the end of roads with nothing around.

MM is right. If they don’t even know how to make a composting toilet or a slow sand filter, and haven’t realised you need more than one meal a week if you’re working on the land, I really don’t think they’ve thought this through. Rent a farm with a farmhouse on it, preferably near a 7-11 and a hospital.

People do illegally build in the mountains, on land they do not own, but it is, well, illegal.

This^^

There are tons of tibetn centers throughout taiwan, not to mention chinese ones, with facilities for this sort of thing. Even if they for some reason want their own digs, I think asking those organizations…rather than some dude whos gonna post on forumosa, would be a lot more sensible. This actually sounds about as hairbrained an idea as I have heard (and I just spent 2 days…in the mountains in a southen Taiwan Buddhist monastery founded by a dude who DID live in a grass hut in the mountains…way back in the day).

Are these "lamas’ adept at farming? What about farming in the Taiwanese climate?

This will end up being on the news…not just the Taiwanese news. A group of Lamas go out and starve in the Taiwanese mountains since they had no way to contact the outside world once their food and water supply ran out after a week and a half.

That is if they survive being bitten by rabid ferret-badgers.

Yeaaaaaaah I’d stay away from the mountains for the next few months… Especially the southern ones. Pretty sure that a pure soul doesn’t stop the effects of rabies.

For how long will they be staying? I have a remote cabin in Hsinchu county…no neighbors, no electricity, running water and some kind of outdoor toilet.

Without that last part this would not sound like the perfect setup for a thrilling horror movie, which it now totally does! :-o

It’s not just rabid animals they’d need to worry about. I’d be worried about the typhoons too. I’m not sure how well an exposed little hut will do against the might of a full blown typhoon. Not too well I’d expect. Those lamas would end up being bounced around like peas in a pod and their mp3s/raw veggies and whatnot would end up scattered across the mountain side, and no one wants that. Better safe than sorry - eh?

[quote=“finley”]MM is right. If they don’t even know how to make a composting toilet or a slow sand filter, and haven’t realised you need more than one meal a week if you’re working on the land, I really don’t think they’ve thought this through. Rent a farm with a farmhouse on it, preferably near a 7-11 and a hospital.

People do illegally build in the mountains, on land they do not own, but it is, well, illegal.[/quote]

Haha. I see there is some sort of misunderstanding on my part. What I meant was the Lamas would be fasting while meditating in the hut. Also, they wouldn’t be building the hut themselves but hiring some laborers to build the hut. It is really a simple one man hut less than 10 ping which would take a few weeks at the most to construct.

But I would be offering MM’s advice, which I personally think is a great idea as well, to the lamas to see what they think.

Problem is the lamas do not know any aboriginals personally at all.

The lamas do not expect to stay in the mountains forever. They would be pretty satisfied with a hut which can last 5-10 years. I know people build houses and expect their houses to last forever but nobody knows what’s gonna happen tomorrow, much less 5-10 years down the road.

This^^

There are tons of tibetn centers throughout taiwan, not to mention chinese ones, with facilities for this sort of thing. Even if they for some reason want their own digs, I think asking those organizations…rather than some dude whos gonna post on forumosa, would be a lot more sensible. This actually sounds about as hairbrained an idea as I have heard (and I just spent 2 days…in the mountains in a southen Taiwan Buddhist monastery founded by a dude who DID live in a grass hut in the mountains…way back in the day).

Are these "lamas’ adept at farming? What about farming in the Taiwanese climate?

This will end up being on the news…not just the Taiwanese news. A group of Lamas go out and starve in the Taiwanese mountains since they had no way to contact the outside world once their food and water supply ran out after a week and a half.[/quote]

Raw fruits, raw veges and water will be sent to the lamas’ hut regularly. As mentioned before, those lamas consume very little food as part of their spiritual training.

The lamas do not expect to stay in the mountains forever. They would be pretty satisfied with a hut which can last 5-10 years. I know people build houses and expect their houses to last forever but nobody knows what’s gonna happen tomorrow, much less 5-10 years down the road.[/quote]

5-10 years…? If it was for a few weeks, they would have been welcome to use my cabin

Go and buy a container (like the ones used on ships/trucks). Stick some windows and doors on it and then put it on a concrete pad anywhere you want.

That’s a nice house, but the no electricity bothers me… unless it’s at a high enough altitude that it doesn’t get hot even in the summer…

Altitude is not important if the house is built properly. People lived here for a long time without ac.

However at least in the US until the invention of AC, buildings couldn’t be over 20 floors because in the upper floor the wind would be too strong to open windows. Also Southern cities such as Houston was only a small outpost until AC was invented, because it’s so hot no one wants to move there… so yea AC’s are a necessary evil sometimes unless you live in Europe.