I help you with English, you help me with Chinese

Hello!
I am a new user, just found out about this forum.
I am a student of Chinese.
Is there anyone here with mothertongue Chinese (Mandarin) who can read & write both traditional and simplified characters, who can help me with my Chinese (I have level B2/C1) - I help him/her/them with his/hers/theirs English proficiency.
The most difficult for me is 口语
Thank you

Zrinka

I wish you/he/they/them/she/her the best of luck with that :smile:

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Most people on this forum are native speakers of English, and the ones that are native speakers of Chinese are already proficient in English. Try HelloTalk.

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I can’t help you with your Chinese, but I can assure you that “they/them/theirs” has been accepted as a gender-neutral way to refer to an individual for at least 25 years in American English. No need to type out or say so many words! For example: “I was talking to this teacher and they said that I should do language exchange with a native speaker” allows you to reference the teacher without making the teacher’s gender known (cuz it’s fully irrelevant information). I’ve talked like that pretty much my whole life, long before there was any discussion about who uses what pronouns. It wasn’t accepted in essays/speeches/papers until college, but in talking to people, it’s the way to go.

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Or italki

This gave me a good chuckle. Best of luck OP.

The singular they had been used in English for the better part of a millenia. You can find it in Chaucer (as much as that can theoretically be interpreted as English :smiley: ), Shakespeare, Austen, etc, etc.

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