Immigrating to Taiwan

Every now and then the question of the status of short- and long-term resident foreign citizens in Taiwan comes up. Are such people “immigrants” or just “passing through” as they may themselves believe and many Taiwanese will assume?

I was interested to read the following in an Economist article on migration statistics:

“Who is an ‘immigrant’? The United Nations has a simple definition: a short-term migrant is anyone who moves to a new country and stays from three months to a year; long-term, one who stays a year or more.” The Economist 15 June 2002 p48

I’ve emigrated/immigrated without knowing it…

I think a lot of it has to do with the way people see themselves. Most Westerners in Taiwan don’t see themselves as “immigrants” but rather as “expatriates”, i.e., sooner or later they will return to their own country. Perhaps this kind of thinking, historically speaking, has something to do with the reluctance most Taiwanese have with the concept of Western immigrants to Taiwan.

I am a Man of the World. Man.

I don’t think that this is the way that most westerners in Taiwan see themselves.

However, it is the way that the Ministry of the Interior sees westerners. Hence, according to the Nationality Law, foreigners must renounce original nationality before obtaining Taiwan nationality.

The question arises: Would it ever be possible to have such a legal stipulation changed? I would be interested in general comments from the community.

Maybe this would be a good poll subject, i.e. “What do you see yourself as, a visitor, an expatriate, an immigrant?” etc.

Or a colonialist? 8)

newsmax.com/showinsidecover. … /17/230632

An immigrant is someone who has emigrated from his her home country, to become an immigrant. Most expats here not emigrate here, they just travelled here to work and live, and they are not immigrants. So have immigrated here on purpose and are longterm residents like Hartzell, but an real immigrant eventually renounces her his prior citizenship and takes on new nationality. I notice most longerms in Taiwan still hold on dearly to their native passports, so they are not immigrants. The only real “intending immigrant” here in Dan Jacobson I guess because he really wants to become a Taiwanese national but the government won’t let him.

Even these long term missionaries here never give up their western passports, even though they talk in terms of “our Taiwan” and “we Taiwanese” but they are not really Taiwanese, just love Taiwan alot and have settled here as long time expats.

Problem is, Taiwan is NOT an immigrant country. it does not want or tolerate immigrants, except in extreme cases. Japan is same, Philippines is same, Vietnam is same, Thailand is same. Most Asian nations do not understand the concept of immigrants because who the eff would want to immigrate there when the Americfan Dream beckons in far off Wonderland UK USA OZ NZ SA Canada?

Send the Mexican-American back “home”? Dual nationality is the norm and it is impossible to turn the clock back on this one.

[quote=“formosa”] I notice most longerms in Taiwan still hold on dearly to their native passports, so they are not immigrants. The only real “intending immigrant” here in Dan Jacobson I guess because he relaly wants to become a taiwnese national but the government won’t let him.

Even these long term missionaries here never give up their western passports, even though they talk in terms of “our Taiwan” and “we Taiwanese” but they are not really Taiwanese, just love Taiwan alot and have settled here as long time expats.[/quote]

As far as I know Dan Jacobson, just like Hartzell and many others, could renounce US citizenship and gain Taiwan citizenship if desired. How is the government not letting them do this? Granted, it is difficult, but not impossible.

American citizens in Taiwan must be colonialists, but not as immigrants?

And any of those rabid Taiwan diehards are mere conspiring separatists of the PRC “War on Terrorism”?

quote the term ‘‘international terrorism’’ means activities that
-
(A) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that
are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of
any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed
within the jurisdiction of the United States or of any State;
(B) appear to be intended -
(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
(ii) to influence the policy of a government by
intimidation or coercion; or
(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by
assassination or kidnapping; and
© occur primarily outside the territorial jurisdiction of
the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of
the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they
appear intended to intimidate or coerce, or the locale in which
their perpetrators operate or seek asylum;
(2) the term ‘‘national of the United States’’ has the meaning
given such term in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and
Nationality Act;[/quote]

Think the PRC Embassy would bring civil lawsuit actions for any defined acts of the TI terrorists or the ROC governing authorities under TRA? Afterall, TECO sued Nigeria.

Careful, TS, you’re entering a state of pillockhood again. Your medication is under the second cushion of your sofa. Better take a double-dose!

I was wondering what that had to do with the quotation above it, but I was sure any questions I had would be met with more of the same. But good luck if you want to try, Sandman.

I like to think of myself as a “longerm.”

:laughing: :shock: :? :x :stuck_out_tongue: :unamused: :wink: :slight_smile: :frowning: :o :imp: :?: :arrow_right: :bulb: :smiley:

Why do so many people comment on this site but fail to supply any answer to the questions presented?

I love all the funny remarks and jokes but I really would like to see a answer now and again. :frowning:

I am a long term resident. Will probably stay for some years, however don’t know the number yet. I don’t see myself as a “real” immigrant in the sense of giving up the ties to Denmark. Moreover, odds are that I won’t retire here. that said, I don’t feel like a guest either.

Nationality and nationalism is a load of codswallop. Passports are just bits of paper for getting into and out of countries. Very handy to have the one of whatever country you’re in at the time - why would anyone want to give one up without a fight ? I have three passports and two cars. All jolly useful, but I can only use one at a time. Doesn’t mean I’m about to give any of them up though. The more the merrier. (Just the one wife, though…) :laughing:

One wife for each nationality~ :shock: There is something to be said for moving to places like Dubai (or :bulb: even Utah)…something more like having more than one headache at a time. :cry: :!:

The most important thing is that we are happy here, no matter what our plans are. :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Let me get this right. You can become an ROC citizen/obtain ROC passport if you give up your original passport?
Are their any other preconditions, such as investing here, number of years spent living and/or working here?
Under what circumstances has any foreigner ever gained an ROC passport? Posters in other threads insist that it is impossible for a foreigner to get an ROC passport.
Not that I want one you understand - just curious.