Is 1930 NTD a big electricity bill for one month?

Hi,

I have an electricity bill of NTD 1 930 for a month.
We only use the air conditioning for an hour each day and that sounds like a lot. Or is it normal for two people in summertime?

I’m a newbie and kinda need a little help reading an electric dial meter too.

Do I start at the right hand side and when the arrow is between two numbers, go with the smaller number?

Thanks

[quote=“Celticguy”]Hi,

I have an electricity bill of NTD 1 930 for a month.
We only use the air conditioning for an hour each day and that sounds like a lot. Or is it normal for two people in summertime?

I’m a newbie and kinda need a little help reading an electric dial meter too.

Do I start at the right hand side and when the arrow is between two numbers, go with the smaller number?

Thanks[/quote]

Sounds about right.

I think depends where you live, as some places have different rates. I usually pay ~ 4000 in summer for 2 months (that’s how the bills for electricity come here, you sure it’s not 2 months bill?), but I use a/c all evening all night for bedroom.

Probably right if you mean your bill is 1930 (which means it is for two months).

1930 would be a bit high for one month if you are using aircon so little.

How old is the A/C unit?

Back in my jungle daze, I had no windows, therefore no a/c. But the fridge from hell drank up the juice like there was no tomorrow. My bills were still about 2000 a month during the summer (at least three fans going and a 24/7 dehumidifier contributed to that as well).

1 hour AC? We have two brand new ones from Hitachi, we let the bedroom one running from 11pm to 8 in the morning and the living room one for about two to three hours a day and we have a total bill of under 1000NT a month.

I haven’t seen my power bill lately, but last time I checked, there were discounts offered if you use less than what you did last year. I think they were like 10% and 15% off depending how much you conserved (compare to what was last year). If it wasn’t inhabited last year this time, then you don’t get any discount.

Yeah my first summer’s bill in this apartment were much higher than subsequent ones.

You can call Taipei Citizen Hotline @ 1999. It’s a toll free number and they have service in English. Just talk to them upfront and ask for English speaker. Available 24/7.
According to my area (I live in Taipei, Daan District). The rate is:
0-240 KwH is $2.1
241-660 KwH is $3.02
661-1000 KwH is $4.39
1001-1400 KwH is $4.97
1401 and above is $5.63
Note: Kwh = Kilo Watt/Hour.
So you need to know what was the number when you came in and subtract that to current number you have.

You should read the contract agreement too. Mine has agreement that I need to pay $5/KwH for electricity. Even, I have my own meter. They won’t let me to pay directly to the Electric company. I won’t bore you with complicated stuff.
Anyhow, call the Taipei Citizen Hotline and check your contract agreement.
I don’t know about you, but $1930/mo or even bi-monthly sounds alot with the usage that you just told.
Last billing cycle I was staying here for 40 days, use the AC about 6-7 hrs for sleeping, 1 hr in a day time to cool off from outside, small fridge, TV rarely on, and of course light. I have laptop, Ipad, Iphone and another cheapy phone. I used 136 KwH total. Supposed to pay: 136X$2.1 =285.60; but because of the agreement I have to pay 136x$5 = $680. Which over double the original cost.
But I think that’s how the landlord make up for the water cost as well. I fcked hate my place! :fume:

It depends on the size of your flat, size of the room you’re cooling, etc.

For a taofan it might seem a little high but for a full apartment it’s very low. If you live in a taofan they tend to have contract agreements, where the meter do not really get read by Taipower but by your landlord to calculate how to split the bill itself. They tend to be high due to increased usage… which averages to around 5nt per kwh.

Apartments use more electricity just because there are more stuff to use… even without AC usage you still pay around 2000 per 2 months simply because summer rate is really high. They jack up the price by about 30% during the summer (june to october) to account for increased demand.

  1. Newer air conditioning units use less electricity, hence bills will be lower.

  2. Bigger places require more power.

  3. Power bills in Taiwan come every two months.

  4. As said, if you do not agree, there are options (hotline, negotiate with landlord, etc.). You yourself can check, turn everything off and if the meter is still running… well, there is a problem.

Ours just came in and is around NT$1500 for 2 months. That’s probably only 6-7 weeks of us living there but the builders were doing stuff before we moved in, so it includes whatever power they used for their equipment. We typically have the bedroom aircon running all night, and sometimes the living room one during the day. Plus computer running 24/7, dish drying machine and all the other usual things.

Is there a separate meter for your apartment or does the landlord split up a shared meter? Additionally your taipower bill is bimonthly.

You also must avoid top floor apartments (probably not the OP). There is a lot of heat radiating in. Our top floor classroom is significantly hotter than the lower floor classrooms despite the same AC system installed. We should probably upgrade the AC but that’s not happening this summer.

Describe your 1 hr of AC usage. If you are constantly turning the AC on/off you aren’t actually saving a lot of money compared to just leaving it on. This would be especially true if you set it to a lower temp than you normally would. This might be difficult to comprehend but it takes a lot of energy to run the AC compressor (especially to lower temps). After a little while the AC compressor shuts off and just the fan runs.

I paid 2430 last month (bimonthly bill) and typically half that in the winter. Overall we are talking about an extra 20-25 NT/day during the summer so I basically do not care and turn on the AC (at 27C) when I’m home. I am at work from 1-9:30 though and that helps.

On the topic… My first bill in new place came yesterday… but we’re confused (we includes my TW bf) as to the time period… The only date it states is July… and we cannot find any mark on the bill pointing the bill as May-June, that we’d expect. So maybe silly question, but where’s the period that you’re paying for on the bill @_@? Before my landlord used to tell me how much, so even tho I am not a newbie in Taiwan… it is the first electricity bill I’ve got on my hands~

Hi guys, sorry for the delay in replying.

We have three a/c’s, one in each bedroom and one in the living room/kitchen. Two are old and my one is newer. In fact the kitchen one is old and I suspect doesn’t work very well.

The 1930 is for one month, we came at the end of June (the 28th I think). While I don’t have the a/c on much, my roommate does and their one is crap so that’s probably sucking up the juice. TBH out a/c are old and are trying to cool really big areas.

We also boil the water to drink, that apparently really drinks the juice. As we’re Irish we like our tea so the kettle is always on.

Thanks for all the info, I didn’t know the electricity companies increased the prices for summer, sneaky ba**ds.

they always increase the price for the summer due to increased demands. They do that since they must use more expensive means of generating electricity to meet those demands.

[quote=“Abacus”]Is there a separate meter for your apartment or does the landlord split up a shared meter? Additionally your taipower bill is bimonthly.

You also must avoid top floor apartments (probably not the OP). There is a lot of heat radiating in. Our top floor classroom is significantly hotter than the lower floor classrooms despite the same AC system installed. We should probably upgrade the AC but that’s not happening this summer.

Describe your 1 hr of AC usage. If you are constantly turning the AC on/off you aren’t actually saving a lot of money compared to just leaving it on. This would be especially true if you set it to a lower temp than you normally would. This might be difficult to comprehend but it takes a lot of energy to run the AC compressor (especially to lower temps). After a little while the AC compressor shuts off and just the fan runs.

I paid 2430 last month (bimonthly bill) and typically half that in the winter. Overall we are talking about an extra 20-25 NT/day during the summer so I basically do not care and turn on the AC (at 27C) when I’m home. I am at work from 1-9:30 though and that helps.[/quote]

When we turn on the a/c we leave it on until it cools down. We usually leave it on for fifteen- twenty minutes to save power. I guess that is not a smart idea though. Would it be cheaper to leave it on for two hours or so?

[quote=“iceymun”]You can call Taipei Citizen Hotline @ 1999. It’s a toll free number and they have service in English. Just talk to them upfront and ask for English speaker. Available 24/7.
According to my area (I live in Taipei, Da’an District). The rate is:
0-240 KwH is $2.1
241-660 KwH is $3.02
661-1000 KwH is $4.39
1001-1400 KwH is $4.97
1401 and above is $5.63
Note: Kwh = Kilo Watt/Hour.
So you need to know what was the number when you came in and subtract that to current number you have.

You should read the contract agreement too. Mine has agreement that I need to pay $5/KwH for electricity. Even, I have my own meter. They won’t let me to pay directly to the Electric company. I won’t bore you with complicated stuff.
Anyhow, call the Taipei Citizen Hotline and check your contract agreement.
I don’t know about you, but $1930/mo or even bi-monthly sounds alot with the usage that you just told.
Last billing cycle I was staying here for 40 days, use the AC about 6-7 hrs for sleeping, 1 hr in a day time to cool off from outside, small fridge, TV rarely on, and of course light. I have laptop, Ipad, Iphone and another cheapy phone. I used 136 KwH total. Supposed to pay: 136X$2.1 =285.60; but because of the agreement I have to pay 136x$5 = $680. Which over double the original cost.
But I think that’s how the landlord make up for the water cost as well. I fcked hate my place! :fume:[/quote]

Whoo, we have to pay 5.5 NTD per kilowatt.
We are like you I think, we don’t use the above system, we have to calculate how much kilowatts we have consumed and multiply the kilowatt by NTD 5.5.

We have to pay for the water we used but I haven’t seen a water meter nor has the landlord said anything about it.

It’s a lot, the only reason we’re not up in arms is because 1) he hasn’t charged us for water or gas and 2) we are only staying for two months so I’m leaving in a month. It’s not worth causing a fuss.

Though in hindsight we should have come here, stayed in a hostel and found a place and negotiated a deal properly.
Next time.

The good thing is when the a/c is off the meter runs very slowly so it’s the a/c, the kettle and the washing machine that is the problem.
And we need the a/c, I’ve never been to a country this hot.

We never have the tv on, we both have laptops (and charge them). In truth we are out a lot and the a/c is rarely on, next time I’m Taipei I am so finding a cheaper place.

Hope you find a better place :slight_smile:

I looked for some experimental data but I couldn’t find any. It would partly depend if your turned it to a lower temp (like 25C) for the 15-20 minutes than if you left it on for 2 hours at 27C. The important part isn’t how long you leave the AC on (15-20 mins) but how long you turn it off. If you are turning it on and off every 15 minutes then you probably aren’t saving much money. I set my AC as high as possible (usually 27C) and just let it go.

There are two new variables that you introduced.

1st - you moved in part way through the month. Was somebody living there during May that used electricity that you got billed for?

2nd - you described your usage as 1 hr/day but then said that your roommate used more. With 2 people AC costs will go up if both are using them at the same time. I lived in a crappy 3 story house for a year and our electricity bill was ridiculous for July/Aug that year. i think it was 6400NT (2 months) but that included AC in the top floor, 2 old crappy refrigerators, shitty windows, fans constantly running to cool dogs and a lot of lights.

Does anyone know where you can rent a meter that you can measure individual devices? I remember some friends rented one (maybe from the power company) in college but I’m not sure if it’s possible here. I’m kind of interested in seeing what the numbers are at my school. Our top floor classroom is just roasting all summer regardless of where the AC is set. Actually it reaches merely warm when set at 22-23C but that has to be consuming a lot of electricity. there are half the number of class hours up there though. It would have been more interesting last summer when the office AC was dying and the solution was to set it at 22 or 23C.