Is Degree a Must (2)


#1

Alien, why did you close that thread?

I’d like to point out two things.

First, not all countries will give you a 2 month extendable visa. New Zealand for example only dishes out 60 Day non-extendables, which are a bit more trouble.

Second, I may be wrong but I thought that you could teach English leaglly on a properly accredited TEFL or ESL certificate.

Bri


#2

I have also heard of exceptions to the ‘must have a degree’ rule.

One acquaintance secured legal teacher status with a diploma in TEFL and proof of having attended a college for two years even though it was a distance learning programme. I guess he lied about that part!


#3

Sorry for closing the other thread, but it seemed like it wasn’t going anywhere further at the time except towards ‘legal matters’. But I can see I was wrong.

Bri, you’re 100% right about people getting these short term non-extendibles and that’s what I was saying in the first round.

As for the TEFL qualifications mentioned, yes, this also applies to Taiwan teaching visas, but an Advanced TEFL Certificate is a whole lot different from a (one month)CELTA or RSA as it entails a fair deal of research. Even our school, Abracadabra, gives 30 credits towards the MSc programme for participants going the Adv TEFL route first. Having done FND+1, which is only a tad more than that, do you have any more TESOL insight than you did last year with all the reading, writing, and research you’ve done? I should say so.

But a TESOL Diploma is a much higher degree than a Certificate, where 120 credits must be completed, leaving only 60 more credits to obtain the actual MSc!

So, I’d say that those with TEFL Certificates, but especially those with TESOL DIPS, are a lot more qualified to teach English in Taiwan than someone with a MBA, don’t you agree? Especially when at least two years or more teaching experience is required before being allowed to even pursue one.
So, if the Taiwan government doesn’t require TESOL Cert and Dip holders to show a BA/BS as well, then their decision is founded on some sort of knowledge of the TESOL practitioner educational scale.
Not to offend anyone, but isn’t this of more practical value in the TESOL industry than Joe Blow’s University of Bumfock BA in Basketweaving?


#4

Would either of you be able to provide me with a little more information on why you feel a degree is not always required.

I have a 2 year accounting diploma with 4 years work experience. I am considering one of those short TESOL certificate courses. Any suggestions you have would be most welcome.

Thank you,

Scott


#5
quote:
Originally posted by ca01007: Would either of you be able to provide me with a little more information on why you feel a degree is not always required.

A degree IS required for an ARC. What exactly are you asking?


#6

alien said:

"So, if the Taiwan government doesn’t require TESOL Cert and Dip holders to show a BA/BS as well, then their decision is founded on some sort of knowledge of the TESOL practitioner educational scale. "

Are you saying they ARE looked upon and judged differently?

the last i knew, a BA was the minimum requirement…no ifs, ands or buts…has this changed?


#7

I know someone who used his TESOL DIP, so no BA was needed.


#8

I think we are talking about the same person Alien and I know that he was also required to provide evidence of having attended college.


#9

If we are speaking of the same person, Abracadaver, then proof of attending college is still not the same as producing a degree. Btw, this person has since received a BA, and his experience and background in the field of TESOL is one of the more superlative ones I’ve seen in Taiwan over the years. Social climber, maybe, but action-oriented for sure.


#10

Ca01007:
I have sent you a private message. You can read it by going into “my profile”. I mention this only because you are new to Oriented and may not know about private messages yet.