Is it a requirement to be from these countries?


#1

In every situation or just certain jobs or schools?

Native English speaker from (USA/UK/CA/AUS/NZ/SA/IRE)


#2

Recently, I noticed Philippines added in some cases.


#3

It’s not a legal requirement. Buxiban language teachers can come from any country where the language they teach is an official language (as listed by the MOFA). There’s more than one thread on this.


#4

But Australia doesn’t have any official language.


#5

Agreed. Or not one from this planet.


#6

I can’t remember the exact conclusions reached when this was last discussed, but I seem to remember de facto national languages being included. Otherwise they’d be judging Americans by which State they were from.

Basically, it’s all down to MOFA’s list. If your name’s not down, you’re not coming in.


#7

It is not what your country says, but what MOFA of ROC recognizes.


#8

So I suppose there’s no legal basis for foreigners teaching foreign indigenous languages in Taiwan.


#9

There is a legal regulation, that the language a foreigner teaches should be a language that MOFA recognizes as an official language of the country from which the teacher’s passport is issued.

Languages such as ayapaneko might be treated differently. I guess @mad_masala might be able to get a visa or citizenship because of that language skill.


#10

Can you find the MOFA or WDA page that lists these? It’s got me scratching my head.
Also, doesn’t this mean someone who grew up and spent their whole life in Kazakhstan, speaks terrible English buts born in the US and therefore had a US passport could teach English in Taiwan?


#11

:trophy:


#12

If you read Chinese, it is here.

https://www.mofa.gov.tw/CountryAreaInfo.aspx?CASN=0984A85A3A9A6677&n=4043244986E87475&sms=26470E539B6FA395

English is listed as the language of Australia.


#13

The Netherlands is listed as

  • 語言:荷語 (英語普及)

So can somebody from The Netherlands teach English legally?


#14

No. Manual in WDA site says 通行言語, 通用言語,普及言語 are not 官方言語 (official language).


#15

Thank you for the clarification.


#16

Yes, and vice-versa. :upside_down_face:


#17

Chinese logic.


#18

Would be entitled to a SA Passport, would think that would be the solution. Just realized I typed a lot of “Woulds”. This may attract Fred Smith .


#19

Or I suppose you could say some transnational people are let into the competition.


#20

And some are excluded. If the system was revamped to just let anyone with a degree delivered in English have a crack and allow the laws of competition determine who gets the good jobs, we’d be seeing much better educational outcomes for the kids. Instead old mate from Kazakhstan who’s mother snuck him onto US soil while still pregnant and gave birth before getting deported can get scholarships to get his Mandarin up to a point where he can get further scholarships to study at a crappy university in an undesirable location, work to keep his bum at a study desk and a roof over his head, graduate with a degree in Chinese language and literature with not so stellar grades, grab a cheap TEFL certificate online and stay on in Taiwan as an English teacher.