Is it imporant for the president can speak fluent English?

Is it imporant for the president can speak fluent English?

  • Yes
  • No

0 voters

Is it imporant for the president can speak fluent English?
(past, current, or future presidents)

Thanks!

Which Presidante?
Of Forumosa?
Isn’t that Sandman?
Doesn’t he already speak Inglish, albeit with the odd fling with the Scots vernacular.?

Is there a coup in progress? :saywhat:

Nyet!

No, not even the Minister of Foreign Affairs.
That’s what we have translators for. You can hear the question, think abount it when you get translation, and give your very stupid reply.

Is it me or is the English off in the title?

I think that Chen Shui Bian should have some English under his belt, as it is the current international language. I don’t know if he does or doesn’t but I have yet to hear if he does. Which means IMO he isn’t interested in intergrating with the world, but demanding for it to meet him on his terms.

But I don’t care for him and his politics, so at the end of the day I really really don’t give a rat’s ass.

GW Bush doesn’t even speak fluent English and he seems to be doing pretty well.

CSB doesn’t speak fluent Mandarin and he seems to be doing pretty well as well.

Language and power are independent of each other.

:laughing: :bravo: :laughing: :bravo: Yea I kinda noticed that while watching the State of the Union speech the other night. It was good that I had a little bit to drink or else it would have been more of a farce than I could have handled. :laughing: :laughing:

[quote=“Ivanchenko”]Is it imporant for the president can speak fluent English?
(past, current, or future presidents)

Thanks![/quote]

Here or there?

I’ve heard that a lot of Taiwanese cringed in collective embarassment* vis-a-vis Lee Teng-hui’s attempt to give a speech in English at Cornell in 1995. A translator would probably have been a better solution, though it might have left people wondering how he had managed to get a PhD there with no English.

(*Or pointed and laughed, as the case may be.)

For the sake of your pictured “protesters” let’s hope so. What Taiwanese spell it as “Taiwaness” and what Americans spell it as “Americaness”?

Whoever they are, I hope A-bian does not take English lessons from them. I hope he doesn’t take English lessons from anyone since there are more important things for him to do such as debating (in perfect Taiwanese Mandarin) the abolition of the guidelines for unification.

For the sake of your pictured “protesters” let’s hope so. What Taiwanese spell it as “Taiwaness” and what Americans spell it as “Americaness”?

Whoever they are, I hope A-Bian does not take English lessons from them. I hope he doesn’t take English lessons from anyone since there are more important things for him to do such as debating (in perfect Taiwanese Mandarin) the abolition of the guidelines for unification.[/quote]

My sentiments exactly.

LTH’s English is much better than CSBs. I don’t think it is that important to speak English fluently, but I think it is very important to respect and value diversity. Here CSB and his cronies have failed greatly. How can a small entity such as “Taiwanese nationalism” compete with “Chinese nationalism” without the support of the international community?

In the last 10-15 years, even countries such as South Korea have been able to establish global companies. For the most part, Taiwanese companies, with the exception of a few tech compananies, have been unable to do this. Why? I’ll tell you – institutional arrogance.

I’ve seen it, observed it, and fought it while serving in government here. Even the people that can speak English in government, don’t think in English or value the customs and sense of fairplay most Westerners hold sacred. Until the government treats foreigners as human, I hope most officials can’t speak English well and that they continue making huge asses of themselves in international settings. I’ve seen this repeatedly in international development. :smiling_imp: To put a positive spin on this, it is changing but the DPP are not behind it – that is for damn sure. :smiling_imp:

Is it important for A president to speak English? No.

Is it important for THE president of today’s ROC, which is currently completely dependent economically and militarily on an English-speaking ally, to speak English and be able to present a positive image to the international community? Yes.

[quote=“taiwansotherside”]Is it important for A president to speak English? No.

Is it important for THE president of today’s ROC, which is currently completely dependent economically and militarily on an English-speaking ally, to speak English and be able to present a positive image to the international community? Yes.[/quote]

Obviously, the DPP message hasn’t gotten through. They got 2 more years though…

I think it’s important that Taiwan have a public face who is appealing and can speak fluent English, but that doesn’t necessarily need to be the president. It’s happened before–the ROC’s public image got a half-century’s worth of good PR from Madame Chiang Kai-shek, after all.

In fact, I think there would be a lot to be said for a female president who is fluent in English, in the mould of Cory Aquino in the Philippines, Benazir Bhutto in Pakistan, and others. NOT Annette Lu. Maybe CSB’s wife?

Mayor Ma speaks good English, I heard. :smiling_imp:

There is hope!

Few years ago, I went to a lecture by mr. Ma. His English is excellent, and he is smart, intelligent, and knows how to skip the bullshit when he talks to foreigners in the absence of the local press. Finally a president that speaks English, US educated, and he will promote a lot of goodwill outside this island, that is mostly busy with itself.

First of all, the ROC president is prevented by precedent from speaking foreign languages in most circumstances. So even if he did speak good English, he wouldn’t be doing it in public.

Nat Bellochi recently said that LTH’s Cornell speech was intelligible. I suspect LTH’s English is better than his Mandarin at this point. Neither are as good as his Japanese.

CSB probably has more English than you people are giving him credit for. Remember, he was lawyer who specialized in maritime law before he began his political career in 1979. I’m sure he can read English even if he can’t speak it.

And no, I don’t think it is that important whether the president can speak English.

If Ma is elected, expect a bunch of kowtowing before the altar of internationalization but little else. The Taiwanese talk a great game about internationalization and the need for English, but they have no idea what any of that would actually entail. When they do find out (What! a foreigner makes more money than me!!!), they get angry and oppose whatever concrete steps were made in that direction.

Look at what happened to TIT (Teach in Taiwan).

Why not? It would seem to be right should Taiwan ever get to Home plate with American, because I am certain that Bush and Co. aint gonna learn Chinese. What is Condi gonna go back to school? Doubt it.

Prevented by precedent? That sounds :loco: considering it doesn’t stop Chen from discussing Taiwan independence. Oh but what do I know, I’m just an English teacher :unamused: