Is Taiwan racist?


#204

The country is made out of immigrants so that means that who went there stood and their kids stood as well. They all have last names from all over the world but they consider themselves US citizens.


#205

This is not so grey, some people are more racist than others yes, but the system is what matters. In Taiwan there are no Laws or legal tools against racism and neither their citizens or the political representatives want to raise them (they dont give a crap unless they give them a bad image… and this is why this post is so healthy), police is racist, the media is racist and more. This is quite different to western systems, no good (especially for a country whose existence is due to american help) and a danger to immigrants living in the island.


#206

I’m not disagreeing. Your experiences are more towards the black area (obvious racism), while other people have experiences of racism that are of a different nature and magnitude. Heck I’ve known more than a few foreign residents of TW that are racist towards locals.

My point is that every person is racist to a certain degree. And that’s not always a bad or intentional thing. What about the baby that cries when she sees someone different? Built in responses. Not all racism is negative or intentional.


#207

Again, the point is not the people, that does not represent a problem in Taiwan. The problem is the system and this represents a real threat here. Look at the poor brit and his banana peel incident. You may have not lived racism, but you can know is there.


#210

Taiwanese are more ignorant and unafraid of using racist statements .
I’m not convinced that they are at heart more racist or not, but expressions of racism are fairly widespread. Government policy seems to have racism embedded (you can call it discrimination against brown people from poor countries if it makes you feel better ).
There’s also a heck of a lot of parochialism .

I used to think I came from a small parochial island nation, then I came to Taiwan and understood what that really means.

‘women taiwanren, nimen waiguoren…’


#213

I do agree with Nacho Taiwanese authorities are racist. Can you imagine non Taiwanese cop or even judge? Or lets say black mayor ?

Not saying Taiwanese should open their borders to everyone, but hey folks do not come here in Europe and complain about immigration process, while your own government does give limiting rights to spouse of locals in the first place. Not mentions rights for other type of immigrants.

Is kinda funny, you support your government policies, but abroad want to have fully western treatment. So chinese. Is really funny, one brit is shamed for banana peel, while you taiwanese sending thousands of criminals to our countries doing phone scams.

My wife had way better treatment in EU countries comparing what i experienced in Taiwan. And yet she complained, meanwhile government giving her tone of social welfare. Actually her social support is higher comparing to peanuts she made in Taiwan

Taiwan did not even bother to pay me me some mandarin classes. They said if you do not like it here, go back, and i went back. I spent my online earned dollars in europe. And i got more for my dollars, and generally less bullshit

Big thumbs up for those who raising up families in taiwan. I would go nuts. Specially for those with traditional parents in laws. Big thumps up. I feel your pain.


#214

My family is doing just fine in Taiwan, thanks for your concern. :grinning:


#215

In all fairness, that’s probably got a lot more to do with you heading the outfit than any prevailing conditions
Just sayin :idunno:


#216

Yeah I said my family was going fine, I didn’t mention moi. :sweat_smile:


#217

No, because the law says they should be taiwanese with no other nationality.

Not aboriginal mayor, but black mayor?

In Taiwan, there are some laws.

Ex.
Regulation for Petitions against Discrimination against People Residing in the Taiwan Area
https://law.moj.gov.tw/MOBILE/lawEng.aspx?pcode=D0080166


#218

When it says “The competent authorities” to what authorities it should refer to? Let´s say the cops acted with discrimination, what are the competent authorities? This article is vague to confusion. Probably never used, and surely after you figure out what are the competent authorities they would look at you with dislike for asking for such a weird thing.
About something more real like what we have in western countries: some one commits a crime against you and if the crime was due to racism whatever punishment would get multiply for being a crime of hate.


#219

Immigration Act:

https://www.moi.gov.tw/english/english_law/law_detail.aspx?sn=332

Regulation for Petitions against Discrimination, etc.:

http://glrs.moi.gov.tw/EngLawContent.aspx?lan=E&id=186


#220

This page links to a page that links to downloadable files containing information and forms regarding discrimination complaints:

http://tcgwww.taipei.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=49113053&CtNode=64570&mp=102162

The information and forms linked on that page are in Chinese:

https://www.immigration.gov.tw/np.asp?ctNode=29758&mp=2


#222

In Taiwan being in a fist fight like what may happen in the West means that knives can be used, baseball bats can be used, friends can be called upon. It gets extremely dirty with no sense of fair play. It is then “all out war”.

Therefore it is extremely important not to let things get that ugly. The key is avoidance at all costs. Unless your life is in immediate peril, then it is up to you to use extreme force as you will be fighting for your life.

I might add that here in California there has been many cases of people getting into bar fights and then coming back inside with a gun to shoot people up. Or running them over with cars once they leave the bar. So its not safe anymore just to have a good ol punch em up.

You don’t even have to be a foreigner to get killed.


#226

Just like the rest of the world.

When someone picks a fight with me, I do as much damage as I can quickly, so he’s in no shape to escalate.

People who look for fights should be EFTGP. People who don’t fight back with all they’ve got will be EFTGP.

Outside of pro boxing, there’s no such thing as a clean, fair fight. It just doesn’t happen.


#227

Unless Adelaide Byrd is judging.


#228

My thoughts too, but what is EFTGP ?


#229

I am sorry but this is simply untrue. This has historically been one of the most linguistically diverse places around!

Guy


#232

The issue with Taiwan and for that matter other traditional Asian cultures like Japan and Korea is that racism is institutionalized by the state.
There are tons of things that a foreigner, even one on an APRC is not allowed to get. If the state has no problem discriminating, the people won’t either.

In Canada you are free to be as racist as you want in your own head. You just can’t let it affect your public dealings with others as you will be publicly shamed, and rightfully so.

Taiwan? Throw a banana peel, the media goes nuts and there is no recourse to complain. People are more offended that a foreigner dared throw a banana peel than the fact that a foreigner got singled out in the first place since locals throw crap out constantly.

There is the issue… state sponsored racism.
I can’t see this situation occurring in Singapore because they have specific laws addressing discrimination, Taiwan does not.


#233

You’re not really a victim of racism the same way say, SEA workers and blacks are in Taiwan. Not even close. White people may get some bad press and everything we do here is examined under a microscope but I can’t remember an incident where I’ve (or any other white people I know here) been belittled, insulted or discriminated against based on their skin color. That is racism. That happens every day to SEA workers and black people in Taiwan.

I’ve witnessed it on multiple occasions, I’ve heard countless stories and it’s left no doubt that, yes, Taiwanese are quite partial to lowering themselves to racism if the need arises. Which it never does, but that doesn’t stop them going for the easy insult every time.

Whilst watching TV the other night there was a Taiwanese TV advertising for a Vaseline product called “Healthy white.” Which had to make me laugh as no matter how much whitening products Asians use they are still brown in my eyes. I’ve never seen a “white” asian. Its just that they come in different shades of brown, some lighter some darker. Ultimately all still brown.

Will I tell you what I observed the other evening on the bus? A large group of university students all who were dressed up looking like they were going to a club. So far, so normal. Just another Saturday night.

Suddenly there was fierce laughter in this group of 20 somethings because of something a boy (he looked about 19 or so but you can never tell with Asians…Now that’s some old fashioned discrimination right there) had on his phone. I was curious what was being passed around that could’ve been so funny. So I glanced over. It was babies. Just babies. What could be so funny about a poor innocent baby I wondered?

Then the boy slid to the next Instagram photo and the next and the next… All had one thing in common. They were black babies. And I mean babies who were very dark skinned. All African babies. Clearly this was hilarious to this group of morons as they were nearly in tears laughing at the black babies.

Now, you can try to excuse them and say that Taiwanese youths are impressionable and quite immature for their age, or you can admonish them like I did. See a racist call a racist is my motto. I was very upset watching their behavior. Not just because of the racism but because this is the next generation, the hope of the future of Taiwan. As a teacher I had to ask myself what on earth are we helping produce into society? A group of kids who think laughing at black babies is funny? Because they have dark skin?

Don’t tell me Taiwan doesn’t have a racism problem people. I see an example at least once a week and I’m not black nor SEA. I’ll agree there are some decent non- racist folk out there certainly but the majority of cases I’ve encountered have not been pleasant to witness or hear.