Is there an english Christian church in Tainan?


#1

Is there an english Christian church in Tainan?
My husband only speaks english, and we have 2 kids(1 y and 3 y old). I’d like a church with a nursery room where I can stay in wsith the kids and also see what’s happening in the chapel.
thanx


#2

Wanny -
There is a church near me, on the est side in the NCKU area, that has services in English. I also think they have the child-care facilities you are looking for - but I’m not certain about that.

PM me if you would like further details.

I do not go to this church but have been aware of the place for quite a few years - it looks like a nice place.


#3

What denomination are you looking for? I know of two Catholic churches that offer masses in English, one of which is taken by a Palestinian priest (the music is AWFUL though).

I can ask a few Christian friends if they know anywhere that offers services in English if you’re after a happier denomination :slight_smile: There’s so many churches in Tainan, I’m sure there’s at least one!


#4

Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian. I asked some people on BBS the other day, “dayspring” looks like a nice one to join.
dayspring.org.tw/_data/new%20building-en.htm

Anyone knows about this church?


#5

[quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian.[/quote]
Catholics are Christians.


#6

[quote=“Chris”][quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian.[/quote]
Catholics are Christians.[/quote]

my husband says they are different. Thanks anyways.


#7

[quote=“Chris”][quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian.[/quote]
Catholics are Christians.[/quote]
OT, but that’s debatable. Depends who you ask. Wasn’t too long ago the Papists called the Protestants heretics that will all burn in Hell.

Be that as it may, as OT as it is, I guess she meant to say: I am not looking for a Catholic church. My husband is a [strike]Christian[/strike]Protestant.

[quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian. I asked some people on BBS the other day, “dayspring” looks like a nice one to join.
dayspring.org.tw/_data/new%20building-en.htm

Anyone knows about this church?[/quote]
I know them, they’re pretty good. You can also try the church across the road from the Confucius Temple (孔廟) in Nan Men Road (南門路). Not sure of the exact address, but if you’re standing at the Confucius temple entrance (with your back to the entrance) and look to your right (towards the Klin market - 克林) it’s to the left of the Klin market. The entrance is next to the coffee shop you’ll see there (and you should be able to see a sign in Chinese that says church, although I forget the name). Pretty easy to find if you’re at the Confucius temple. Can’t miss it. I know they have an English Pastor and the sermon is directly interpreted into Chinese as he preaches. As far as I know they also have child-care facilities where you can still see and follow the sermon.
When you get there, ask for a Taiwanese girl called Jenny. Her English is fantastic, so she’ll be able to speak with you or your husband and give you any information about the church, it’s facilities and service times.


#8

Catholics are Christians, if they have trusted in Jesus alone for the forgiveness of their sins. Being a Christian does not mean being a member of the Roman Catholic Church. It means being a member of the body of Christ which is accomplished by faith and trust in Jesus alone for the forgiveness of your sins. It means that you do not add your works to His work.


#9

Some Protestants claim that Catholics are not Christians. It is a method of attack.

The definition of Christian is “one who follows the Christ”(as in his teachings). This is specifically about a belief in forgiveness, although that is pretty standard among Christians. I need to note that Christ is not a name-it’s a title meaning something like Messiah. So, use of this name also suggests a belief that Jesus was prophesied by God.


#10

Guys, you should know by now that this “Catholic / Christian” distinction is a Chinese translation problem. No need to get so defensive about it. (Anyway, the pope’s a tough guy and can take care of himself.)

The obvious follow-up is, what kind of church are you looking for–mainline (like Presbyterian, Methodist, etc.)? Evangelical? Charismatic?


#11

Yes, there is an English Christian church in Tainan.

It’s called "Living Water Church"
It is on Nanmen Road, across the street from the Confucius Temple.
Bus 7 Cafe is a coffee shop there, go in there and ask anyone about the church, (it’s just two shops over from Bus 7) on the 10th floor.

Saturday - 6pm - 8 pm
Sunday 10am - noon


#12

[quote=“Rennes”]Yes, there is an English Christian church in Tainan.

It’s called "Living Water Church"
It is on Nanmen Road, across the street from the Confucius Temple.
Bus 7 Cafe is a coffee shop there, go in there and ask anyone about the church, (it’s just two shops over from Bus 7) on the 10th floor.

Saturday - 6pm - 8 pm
Sunday 10am - noon[/quote]
No one ever reads the threads…

[quote=“bismarck”]You can also try the church across the road from the Confucius Temple (孔廟) in Nan Men Road (南門路). Not sure of the exact address, but if you’re standing at the Confucius temple entrance (with your back to the entrance) and look to your right (towards the Klin market - 克林) it’s to the left of the Klin market. The entrance is next to the coffee shop you’ll see there (and you should be able to see a sign in Chinese that says church, although I forget the name). Pretty easy to find if you’re at the Confucius temple. Can’t miss it. I know they have an English Pastor and the sermon is directly interpreted into Chinese as he preaches. As far as I know they also have child-care facilities where you can still see and follow the sermon.
When you get there, ask for a Taiwanese girl called Jenny. Her English is fantastic, so she’ll be able to speak with you or your husband and give you any information about the church, it’s facilities and service times.[/quote]
:ohreally:


#13

[quote=“wanny”][quote=“Chris”][quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian.[/quote]
Catholics are Christians.[/quote]

my husband says they are different.[/quote]

Then your husband is a prize idiot.


#14

[quote=“Gao Bohan”][quote=“wanny”][quote=“Chris”][quote=“wanny”]Thanks for the infomations.
I am not looking for Catholic church. My husband is a Christian.[/quote]
Catholics are Christians.[/quote]

my husband says they are different.[/quote]

Then your husband is a prize idiot.[/quote]
Really?

Here’s a fairly decent “short” answer that would disagree with you: What is the difference between christian and catholic?

[quote]Catholicism and Biblical Christianity are divergent religions. They are built on [color=#FF0000]different foundations[/color], and they [color=#FF0000]propose different ways of salvation[/color].

In principle, [color=#FF0000]Christianity is built solely on the Holy Scriptures[/color], the written Word of God. The Bible is our only infallible rule of faith, being sufficient to give us the sure knowledge of the Gospel for our salvation and holiness.

[color=#FF0000]Roman Catholicism demands submission of the intellect and will to the doctrines taught by the Roman magisterium[/color] (the Pope and bishops). It is claimed that the Catholic Church derives its doctrines from the “sacred deposit” found in Scriptures and Sacred Tradition. However the faithful cannot verify these doctrines by referring to the original sources. The Scriptures are inaccessible because only the magisterium is able to establish the authentic meaning. Similarly the contents of Sacred Tradition can only be known through the magisterium. Roman Catholicism is mental and spiritual slavery to the Vatican.

As expected, since the foundations are different, so also are the edifices built upon them. [color=#FF0000]Christianity stands on the Gospel of God’s sovereign grace[/color]. In love, God predestines His chosen ones to be adopted as sons through Jesus Christ, their sole mediator. The Son became man and gave His life as a ransom to secure their freedom from sin. Being dead in sin, they are completely unable to convert ourselves or merit God’s favour. Therefore God graciously grants His people repentance and faith to turn to Him and trust in Christ Jesus for salvation. [color=#FF0000]Believers are accepted in Christ, solely on the merit of His righteousness and blood, and not because of any goodness or human merit[/color]. God also resides in His people by the Holy Spirit, enabling them to obey and glorify the Father, and to guarantee their inheritance in heaven forever.

[color=#FF0000]Rome’s “gospel” is not good news at all[/color]. The Roman institution, calling itself “The Church”, usurps Christ’s mediatorial office, proclaiming herself as the “sacrament of salvation.” [color=#FF0000]The “Church” dispenses salvation to her faithful in small portions, starting at baptism and continuing throughout life. Forgiveness can only be obtained through the sacrament of penance.[/color] The benefits of Christ’s sacrifice are accessible through the sacrifice of the Mass. [color=#FF0000]Instead of teaching the faithful to rest in Christ by faith, Catholics are taught to perform religious works to “merit grace” and to do penance to make satisfaction[/color]. Even after death, Catholics remains dependent on the “Church” to relieve their suffering in Purgatory by masses and indulgences.

The Roman Catholic Church is a mighty obstacle to anyone seeking salvation, enslaving millions of people to a religious system and preventing them from coming directly to Christ.

The choice is between the Bible and the Roman magisterium; the choice is between salvation by grace through faith in Christ, or through human merit and effort in the Roman religion.[/quote]
And then we’re not even getting into deeper issues like excommunication in Catholicism that basically means a one way ticket to Hell, whereas in Christian belief systems this is impossible, as only the believer can condemn himself by turning away from Christ.

The same answer here: The Difference Between Catholicism and Christianity

Here are two answers: What are the differences between Christianity and Catholicism?
Answer 1: Sees them as both being Christian, in a round about sort of way.

[quote]The question should be "What are the differences between Catholicism and other Christians?"
Before delving into differences, [color=#FF0000]it would be beneficial to list things that all Christians, including Catholics, have in common[/color]:

  • God is the Creator, and Sustainer, of the Universe .
  • God is deeply interested in the human race.
  • God is Father, Son and Holy Spirit: 3 persons but 1 God.
  • God became incarnate in the person known as Jesus. (Incarnation)
  • The Virgin Mary conceived Jesus through the power of the Holy Spirit, not through any sexual act with another person.
  • Jesus is completely human and completely divine.
  • Human beings turned away from God’s wisdom: this is sin. Actually, humans ate of the fruit of knowledge, becoming aware of the existence of sin and thereby losing their innocence. They did so out of disobedience to God and as a result of listening to the serpent (Satan, the deceiver, formerly first among the angels and cast down by God), and the result was being thrown out of Eden.
  • Only God can save human beings from the grasp of sin. (Not technically true, as Rome doesn’t allow for this.)
  • Jesus (God incarnate) saved humanity by His freely-given sacrifice on the cross.
  • Jesus rose from the grave, conquering death, and ascended in to Heaven.
  • Christ will return one day; how, and in what form, we do not know. Although scripture suggests that His return will be as a lion rather than as a lamb, perhaps meaning that He will not be as gentle when He returns.
  • Through Christ’s passion, death + resurrection, God reconciled humanity to Himself.
  • God’s grace (His love) and the salvation offered are completely free and cannot be
    earned by what a person does, no matter how noble.
  • The Holy Spirit dwells within each person.
  • The Bible is a collection of works written by men. Some of these works were divinely inspired and are the word of God. All of the works in the current bible were selected by the Catholic church, with some books being omitted since they did not support the Catholic view. (Also, not technically true, as there are various important differences between the Latin Vulgate and the KJV etc)
  • Jesus Christ is Head of the Church and is always present. (Also, not technically true, as the RCC sees the Pope as God’s sole representation on Earth.)
  • Jesus left Christians the command to spread the Good News of salvation.
  • Jesus directly left Christians 2 sacraments: Baptism and Eucharist. (Not true, most Protestants don’t have the Eucharist Sacrament. Unless calling it Holy Communion makes it the same, I disagree, but that’s maybe just semantics.)
  • God’s will is that all people accept the salvation and eternal life offered.
    .
    Now, the main doctrinal differences between Catholics and Protestants
  • Catholics believe that after the Fall in the Garden of Eden, some original innocence and goodness remained in humanity whilst much of Protestantism (e.g. Presbyterianism, Lutheranism, Methodism, Baptists, Assemblies of God, Pentecostalism) teaches that humanity became totally depraved. A citation is needed for this thought, because not all Christians are taught that humanity is without goodness and innocence.
  • Catholics: The bread and wine in the Eucharist are miraculously, and mysteriously, changed in to the Body and Blood of Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit. [color=#FF0000]Protestants believe there is no change and that Christ’s presence is symbolic [/color](though many Anglicans do believe there is a change)
  • Catholics: believe that only Catholics are permitted to partake of the Eucharist. Protestants practice “Open Communion” that expressly welcomes all believers to the Lord’s table, regardless of denomination.
  • [color=#FF0000]Catholics[/color]: There are [color=#FF0000]seven sacraments[/color] (holy moments): Baptism, Eucharist, Confirmation, Marriage, Ordination, Reconciliation/Confession and Anointing of the Sick. [color=#FF0000]Protestants have only 2[/color] sacraments: Baptism and Eucharist (though some Anglicans also believe in seven)
  • Catholics: [color=#FF0000]It is Christ’s will that there be 3 types of minister in the Church[/color]: bishops, presbyters/priests and deacons. Protestants sometimes have deacons but no presbyters/priests or bishops. A citation is needed for this thought, because most Christian churches have pastors/priests.
  • Catholics: The saints are worthy of both honor and respect due to their fidelity to Christ. Catholics do not pray to saints, but ask saints to pray for them just as they would ask any person of faith for prayer. (For Protestants, this is communing with the dead, which is forbidden in the Bible.) For Catholics, saint’s physical bodies may be dead, but they are spiritually with Christ. Protestants do not ask saints for prayer because they believe that only Christ can intercede with God the Father. [color=#FF0000]Most non-Catholic Christians also view the practice of praying to saints as idolatry.[/color]
  • Catholics: The greatest saint is Mary, Mother of Jesus. Mary was so full of love for God that she did not sin (Immaculate Conception). [color=#FF0000]Protestants respect Mary as Jesus’ mother but believe that she sinned like any other person[/color]. They believe that Mary was entirely human, and not holy.
  • Catholics: Because she did not sin, Mary’s resurrected body was taken into heaven immediately after her death (the Assumption). Protestants believe Mary’s body was buried, but where is the proof of what happened to her body?
  • Catholics believe that only a person perfectly open to God can enter heaven; thus, when someone dies the sinfulness left inside is purged (Purgatory) by God’s love. Purgatory is not a place but an experience. Protestants do not accept the doctrine of cleansing/purgation but say that a soul goes immediately to either heaven or hell. However, [color=#FF0000]Christians that accept that Jesus died for all of their sins, and thereby reconciled them to God, believe that everyone who accepts Jesus as their Lord and Savior, who died to deliver them from their sins goes to Heaven.[/color]
  • Catholics: God not only speaks to His people through Sacred Scripture, but also through the daily life of the Church over a long period of time; [color=#FF0000]this is called tradition[/color] (or controlling the masses all their lives, thereby concentrating exclusive power in the Pope aka Pontifex Maximus aka The Roman Emperor), and, although important, can never contradict Scripture. [color=#FF0000]Protestants believe in sola scriptura: Scripture alone[/color], although some groups (e.g. Anglicans) do value tradition. However, some Christians do not believe that the bible is the unadulterated word of God. It only includes the works selected by Catholics, not selected by the Apostles, and as such is only the word of Catholics. The word of God is present in the bible, but the Catholics have selected works that supported their sect and perhaps omitted the word of God that was present in other works of the time.
  • Catholics: The Bishop of Rome (pope) is the spiritual leader of the Church (Christ is the Head), as this is Christ’s will. Protestants do not accept the pope as spiritual leader, although some non-Catholics (e.g. Anglicans) have their own spiritual leader. Most Christians who are not Catholic view Jesus as the head of the Church. In this view, there is no need for other religious figures, since Jesus fulfills all religious needs. Jesus has already granted us Salvation without any requirements aside from believing on the Lord and being saved.
  • Catholics: [color=#FF0000]Though he is capable of making mistakes, when the pope formally speaks about morals or dogma in the name of the whole Church, he cannot make a mistake because the Holy Spirit guides the Church. (Infallibility)[/color]. This has only happened twice. [color=#FF0000]Protestants do not accept papal infallibility and do not believe that any one person can speak for the Church[/color]. Jesus was the only person who could speak for the church, because he was also divine. The Apostles were directly influenced by Jesus, and could also speak for Jesus. Beyond this, nobody has authority to give morals or dogma because the time of Prophets is over, we are told by God in the Bible.
    Non-doctrinal differences:
    There are other differences, due to human (not divine) law, and these may change.
  • [color=#FF0000]Catholic priests of the Latin Rite may not be married[/color] (Eastern Rite Catholic priests may be married). Protestant clergy may be married.
  • Catholic laity have a voice in the Church but they do not help govern. In Protestant (and Orthodox) churches the laity help make every day decisions.
  • Catholics have no say in whom their leaders will be while in Protestant (and Orthodox) churches people usually either choose or have real influence. (As it was with the early Church before Catholicism.)
  • Catholicism tends to be more prescriptive when it comes to what vestments to wear during services whilst in Protestant churches clergy have great freedom.
  • Catholicism tends to be much more centralized than Orthodoxy and Protestantism.
  • Catholicism does not allow a divorced person to be remarried in church unless a Church annulment has been granted. Whilst a few Protestant churches (e.g. Church of England) do not like to remarry divorcees, most permit remarriage after divorce.
  • Catholicism allows non-Catholics to receive Holy Communion only under strict conditions. Protestant churches usually allow any baptized person to receive Communion, although some non-Catholic churches do not observe Communion. (Orthodox churches totally forbid the practice).

Answer
[color=#FF0000]The mainstream religions of the world and Catholics themselves consider Catholicism to be Christianity.[/color] (Propaganda is a wonderful tool.)
A difference between Protestantism and Catholicism includes [color=#FF0000]celibacy of the clergy[/color], that is that priests cannot be married, (Jesus is not recorded in the Bible as making that a requirement, and the apostles were all married, save St. John, though they were married before they knew Jesus). The defense of a non-married clergy comes from the understanding that Jesus was not married since He dedicated His life solely to God, and sought to teach people the Word of God free of familial obligations. Hence, the Catholic priests of today do not marry so they may dedicate their lives to God and teach people the Word of God. Eastern rite priests, however, can be married before they enter the seminary to become priests.

Another difference is in receiving Communion. [color=#FF0000]Catholics are offered Communion at every Mass[/color]. The idea being that, as human beings, they can receive the Body and Blood of Christ and the strength it gives to live a Christian life.
[color=#FF0000]A third difference is the idea of confession[/color]. Catholics believe that they should go to confession to verbally express their sins. Besides the grace of the sacrament and the guarantee that their sins are forgiven by Christ who acts through the priest, Catholics also feel a natural sense of peace. Some other religions think that a Catholic has to go to confession, almost as a punishment. However, most Catholics feel this give them happiness, joy and strength.
Catholics are Christians and they believe in Christ.

Even what is “written in the Holy bible is just the word of man”. As what is written in the Magisterial Teachings of the Roman Catholic church. The differences are huge and many between the numerous denominations of Christianity to the point one wonders so many beliefs are really from God or man-made. However, most Christians believe there is only one God, and that no matter the name you attach to your one God, we all worship the same one God.[/quote]

Answer 2:

[quote]Roman Catholic Answer
[color=#FF0000]Christianity is the religion of, the body of faith and morals taught by, the Catholic Church of Christ[/color]. The word may be properly extended to include the religious systems of the dissident Eastern churches and of [color=#FF0000]some Protestant bodies[/color] (see Christian below). The current popular use of the word [Christianity] in an ethical, subjective sense, is to be deplored: it is stripping it of all objective or historical connotations. (So they see themselves as Christians and everyone who doesn’t agree with them as Heretics and Hell bound. No surprise there.)

Christian. A name first given to the followers of our Lord at Antioch (Acts xi, 26). [color=#FF0000]Since the rise of Protestantism the name has been used in so many different senses as to have become almost meaningless[/color]: it may indicate a Catholic or a Unitarian, or even be applied to an infidel who displays some virtue which is associated with Christ. It may reasonably be applied to the members of all the ancient churches, whether in communion with the Holy See or not, and to those Protestants who profess, explicitly or implicitly, the Nicene creed in its traditional interpretation. [color=#FF0000]the Church puts no definite official meaning on the word, as she does on Catholic[/color].[/quote]
Neatly sidestepping the issue, as always.

I prefer the first answer at the beginning of the post, but it’s quite clear, even in the Catholic answer, that whether you see Catholics as Christian or not really depends on how you define the word Christian. So, I put it to you, that her husband isn’t quite the idiot you seem to think he is. :2cents:


#15

A priceless post. Should be recommended by many. Pity it won’t though.


#16

GBH -
IMO, a very rude answer. 2 Hail Marys and 1 Our Fathers and go meditate on the life of a particular Saint for your penance Laddie.

All of this angst to a simple request for assistance is, IMO, very uncharitable.


#17

At least you did. :wink:


#18

The answers from all three quotes show their biases. The first and third both consider themselves to be the True Christians. Others are heretics.

Number 2 was less biased, though I would add to this statement:

[quote]The mainstream religions of the world and Catholics themselves consider Catholicism to be Christianity.[/quote]I would agree with this statement of Catholic belief, and also say the same of many branches(and individual practitioners) of Protestantism-notably the fundamentalist Baptist Churches I attended as a kid. Yes, propaganda IS a wonderful tool.


#19

[quote=“spitzig”]The answers from all three quotes show their biases. The first and third both consider themselves to be the True Christians. Others are heretics.
Number 2 was less biased, though I would add to this statement:

What are you on about?
read the original post:

Simple question. The answer appears to be - YES.


#20

You’re all wrong. Catholics and Protestants both belong to what is known as “Christendom.” Only the Jehovah’s Witnesses represent true Christianity. All other religions originated in ancient Babylonian occultism.