Is there an epithet/slur used to refer specifically to Mainland Chinese?

Perhaps it might be used only by the Taiwanese, or it could be used by other overseas Chinese as well. In any case, what is it?

I got the impression that just calling someone Mainland Chinese was enough of an insult by itself. :wink:

Did you mean in Chinese? If so, a lot of people say 426 (死二六, which i think comes from 死阿陸 – damned mainlander)

If you’re asking about English, there are far too many, but they don’t usually specify the difference between a Chinese citizen and an ethnically Chinese person.

EDIT:

The poster below got it right: 阿陸仔 minus 仔 = 阿陸 (26), and feel free to add 死 in front at your heart’s content.

阿陸仔 or 阿六仔 or 阿6仔 (Taiwanese: a-lak-a or a-lok-a) is usually derogatory.

I need to get out more. None of my friends swear like this.

A-la̍k-á/A-lio̍k-á 阿陸仔 (mainlandman) is very very common. You can hear both pronunciations, where lio̍k is the literary pronunciation, and la̍k is the colloquial pronunciation. The word 大陸 (mainland) originally should be pronounced as tāi-lio̍k, hence A-lio̍k-á. But going one step further in looking down on them, colloquial form is used, hence A-la̍k-á. Some people go one step further and pronounce it as A-lâ-á 阿蜊仔 (clams).

I don’t think it really is a swear, it’s at most a non-endearing nickname… Because in reality, someone who really dislikes China would not refer to it as the mainland.

if you really want to talk about slur and swearing, elder generations used to simply refer to the Chinese (including KMT nationalists) as kā-kam-á (咬柑仔, one who bites an orange) which refers to:

or simply just as ti (豬). Amongst the elder generations (talking about 70s or above), that would be clear enough as to who they are referring to. For them, single word káu (狗, dog) is for the Japanese (especially the Japanese police). sann-kha-á (三跤仔, 3 legged) refers to dogs with only 3 legs, and Taiwanese who collaborate with the Japanese or KMT authorities.

Now a days, young people feels the need say tiong-kok-ti to make it clear.

By the way, growing up in the 80s, where martial law was reaching the peak of its effects, as a very blue-washed kid, who had no Taiwanese holo skills at all, I did not understand what my grandpa was talking about when he was telling me about the ills of the kā-kam-ás. Not a single word. Frankly I didn’t even know it meant one who bites oranges, let alone it’s implied meaning. But after learning Taiwanese holo in college, and now he has past away, sometimes I think about the long strolls in Tainan park, where he would speak to me in Taiwanese holo, and actually remember what he said to me, and actually understand it now…

I have the same experience with English sometimes, thinking back to an event where at the time my English was too poor to understand what was said, and almost like rehearing the words again and finally get it…

Big Fat Belgian Bastard!

My 4-year old son is crazy about Star Wars right now and thinks he’s Luke Skywalker, AKA 路克. Anyway, we were walking by the ShiLin night market and my wife said not to say that so loud b/c that’s what they call the mainland tourists (I guess in a not so flattering way?). With my poor Chinese, she thought I was saying 陸客。Anybody heard that? I doubt her sources sometimes.

yes, 陸客 means Chinese tourists. But it is a neutral term. However, having a kid run around a group of Chinese tourists yelling 陸客!陸客! at the top of his lungs is probably a bad idea.

It’s time to show him the original version where Han Solo shot first, so he will start yelling Han Solo! Han Solo! instead… Hope that doesn’t sound at all like Han Chauvinists in Chinese.

共匪

less and less people are willing to use this term. this term originated from KMT’s point of view that the Chinese Communist Party occupied China illegally. But now KMT and late immigrants are busy sucking up to the Chinese and CCP, so they won’t use that term.

Other Taiwanese (Early/Late Immigrants alike) who are more aware of the KMT brain wash materials will see how adopting this term is of no help for Taiwan independence. So there are two types of people who still uses this term:

  1. Die hard KMT/Chiang Kai-sek fundamentalists, who disagrees with KMT compromising with the CCP, but still maintains Taiwan is a part of China. These people should never visit China, or do so grudgingly.

  2. Older Taiwanese people who believes in Taiwanese independence, but the brain washing is too well ingrained in mind, so they will have a hard time phasing the terminology out. Such people also have issue with not using the term 山地同胞.

  3. Ignorant people who doesn’t give a frak.

less and less people are willing to use this term. this term originated from KMT’s point of view that the Chinese Communist Party occupied China illegally. But now KMT and late immigrants are busy sucking up to the Chinese and CCP, so they won’t use that term.

Other Taiwanese (Early/Late Immigrants alike) who are more aware of the KMT brain wash materials will see how adopting this term is of no help for Taiwan independence. So there are two types of people who still uses this term:

  1. Die hard KMT/Chiang Kai-sek fundamentalists, who disagrees with KMT compromising with the CCP, but still maintains Taiwan is a part of China. These people should never visit China, or do so grudgingly.

  2. Older Taiwanese people who believes in Taiwanese independence, but the brain washing is too well ingrained in mind, so they will have a hard time phasing the terminology out. Such people also have issue with not using the term 山地同胞.

  3. Ignorant people who doesn’t give a frak.[/quote]

Great summary. It’s like older Americans who might still use words like commie and chicom. I use it sometimes as a joke, since a 20-something white guy going on about 共匪 sort of underpins how ridiculous it is. I like to live life ironically… now where are those Hipster glasses?

I use it for fun too.

so what does two six mean? Does it stand for 1926? Didn’t the war start the year later?

Oh, I guess if you don’t speak Chinese my explanation above doesn’t make sense. 426 in Chinese = si er liu, which is an intentional corruption of 死阿陸仔 (si a lu, with the final character zai being cut off).

死 literally means dead, but is used as a prefix in vulgarities to mean something like “damned.” 阿 is hard to explain… It’s sort of a term used for familiarity in Mandarin but shows up a lot more often in Taiwanese. 陸 means “land,” in this case a shortened version of 大陸 which is “mainland.” And 仔 is another Taiwanese-ism that is more-or-less a meaningless suffix, which is probably why it was dropped.

So calling someone 26 is like saying “a mainlander,” and calling some 426 is saying they are “a damned mainlander.”