Job hunting in China

Facing the terror that is graduation (MA), I’ve begun my job search in earnest but haven’t been doing so well in either Taiwan or my native USA. Can anyone recommend a good website for job searching in China… or for that matter anywhere else in the world?

Thanks as always. :pray:

eslcafe.com

Addendum: not talking about English teaching… If I wanted to do that, I’d do it in a place I love living, like Taiwan.

What do you want to do?

What do you want to do?

I’m open to anything, but I’d really like to stay away from teaching and sales (which is all I can seem to find in Taiwan). My MA is in translation, but I haven’t found anything translation-related that can provide me a full-time, ARC-offering job. I’m very willing to do anything outside of my experience (reporting and translation) as well, which is why I thought I’d browse through a job website from across the Strait.

You’re not going to find much in China besides sales and English teaching. A simple google search of Zhongguo gongzuo wangzhan 中国工作网站 will provide you with many results.

:s

I assumed being fluent in Chinese and an experienced translator would improve my employment prospects… Oddly it hasn’t.

One option would be to send your CV to various translation agencies and ask for a full time in-house job (that’s if you fancy it). I’m not sure what you’re chances are in Taiwan, but I’m pretty sure that you’d find plenty of such agencies on the mainland. If you’re enjoying life in Taiwan, then how about giving the local agencies a go first?

That’s what I do. And if you can’t find an in-house position, you can do freelance and stay in the country on a visitor’s visa. That’s what I do.

I don’t know what kinds of opportunities people with translation degrees would look for beyond something involved communications, so I hope this general advice is useful.

I would start by making sure I had a basic online presence I could refer people to see my background and so I could be easily reachable in China:

  1. LinkedIn Profile - this is easy, but you should look into making a Simplified Chinese version with what LinkedIn provides you
  2. Ushi.cn - the closest thing to LinkedIn in China - build your profile there. Btw, the founder/owner is Canadian and his kids are half-Taiwanese - so it’s operated like a China-savvy western company
  3. Weibo - at the very least, it’s just another way to reach potential contacts, colleagues, recruiters and headhunters, but as a communications professional, you can showcase and show-off your Mandarin skills there

Create a FutureStep profile
candidates.futurestep.com/
You may not have any interest in a career in Big Corp, but you owe it to yourself to have an idea what all those HR departments are expecting to see (however misguided and misunderstood they may well be). FutureStep began as a joint venture between Korn/Ferry (the biggest head hunter on the planet) and Dow Jones (WSJ). It’s changed a lot since then, but it aspires to be the quintessential Applicant Tracking System. Plus, my wife used to work out of KF Shanghai, so I know first hand they use it as a resource

Btw, LinkedIn has a lot of jobs in China - learn to refine your searches, and make sure you profile will appear on more LinkedIn search results (that’s code for “become a LION” - a LinkedIn open networker)

Scan CreativeHunt for short-term gigs
creativehunt.com/shanghai/
Started by the people who set up SmartShanghai, you might find a job to tide you over while you search for your career job. Remember to take note of the companies who are posting and then go to your LinkedIn and Ushi networks to reach out to people who are working there for advice and insider information – Shanghai is full of coffee shops and nice new restaurants, so be ready to buy lots of coffee in exchange for on the ground advice.

Browse the EnjoyClassifieds
enjoyshanghai.com/jobs/
The EnjoyClassifieds was one of several inspirations of the many attempts at classifieds here at Forumosa. They themselves have gone through many iterations, but what makes them different is, well, they are a working classifieds! Again, this should be a good source of short-term work or jobs that you don’t really want but will be willing to do while you keep hunting for that career break.

Check in at the Community Center
communitycenter.cn/classesoverview
The Community Center in Shanghai was founded by some of the old guard from the Community Services Center in Tienmou (one of many examples of “Taiwan refugees” who have made The Move that you are considering). If you know people at the Center here, get them to introduce you over there. Better yet, walk in and volunteer to help. And if it means teaching, give it some serious thought: you’ll be networking with professionals, tai-tais, and “guy-tais” as well. Not a bad way to hit the ground running

Go to church
If you practice some organised religion, seek out the international community of members in Shanghai. There probably will be one, and it likely will be composed of a broad cross section of society. I was active in the Catholic community, and found the parish to be an incredible resource of friends, contacts, and professionals of all stripe: from the heads of multinational regional centres to housekeepers to diplomats to students to musicians. This is the same as in any major city around the world (including Taipei) but being in a soulless capitalist haven like Shanghai kind of helps us all feel like we are on the same side (and, uh, being a soulless haven of capitalism is partly why we love the place).

I would assume this would put you at an advantage if you wanted to be an entrepreneur over there. Many have started and succeeded in business there without it, so I would expect you could so much sooner than they did if you were inclined to be your own business.

Yeah. I’ve done freelance translation, but it’s always been sporadic: a bunch of work for a week or two and then nothing more a month. I’ve always been too busy to give it a full go, though.

Too be honest, sales is not a bad gig if you’re starting out, especially if you have never worked in a fully Chinese language environment. I’m doing it and it can be fun at times – exhibitions and travel. It’s nice to have that experience, too. The hours are long and the pay has been considerably less than English teaching ( 45k NT vs 100k NT plus / mo. ). I’m holding out that it will lead to better things.

Unfortunately, I had a really great work experience in a news room that was almost entirely Chinese (except when we were discussing translational matters) which I think has gone to set unrealistic expectations for what a workplace can be. I left because the pay was very insufficient – I’m not looking for a high salary, but I was making there only half of what your moderately experienced English teacher would be making. The political ideology and also contributed to my leaving.

Well, I’ll keep looking. Thanks everyone!

[quote=“Goose Egg”]I don’t know what kinds of opportunities people with translation degrees would look for beyond something involved communications, so I hope this general advice is useful.

I would start by making sure I had a basic online presence I could refer people to see my background and so I could be easily reachable in China:

  1. LinkedIn Profile - this is easy, but you should look into making a Simplified Chinese version with what LinkedIn provides you
  2. Ushi.cn - the closest thing to LinkedIn in China - build your profile there. Btw, the founder/owner is Canadian and his kids are half-Taiwanese - so it’s operated like a China-savvy western company
  3. Weibo - at the very least, it’s just another way to reach potential contacts, colleagues, recruiters and headhunters, but as a communications professional, you can showcase and show-off your Mandarin skills there

Create a FutureStep profile
candidates.futurestep.com/
You may not have any interest in a career in Big Corp, but you owe it to yourself to have an idea what all those HR departments are expecting to see (however misguided and misunderstood they may well be). FutureStep began as a joint venture between Korn/Ferry (the biggest head hunter on the planet) and Dow Jones (WSJ). It’s changed a lot since then, but it aspires to be the quintessential Applicant Tracking System. Plus, my wife used to work out of KF Shanghai, so I know first hand they use it as a resource

Btw, LinkedIn has a lot of jobs in China - learn to refine your searches, and make sure you profile will appear on more LinkedIn search results (that’s code for “become a LION” - a LinkedIn open networker)

Scan CreativeHunt for short-term gigs
creativehunt.com/shanghai/
Started by the people who set up SmartShanghai, you might find a job to tide you over while you search for your career job. Remember to take note of the companies who are posting and then go to your LinkedIn and Ushi networks to reach out to people who are working there for advice and insider information – Shanghai is full of coffee shops and nice new restaurants, so be ready to buy lots of coffee in exchange for on the ground advice.

Browse the EnjoyClassifieds
enjoyshanghai.com/jobs/
The EnjoyClassifieds was one of several inspirations of the many attempts at classifieds here at Forumosa. They themselves have gone through many iterations, but what makes them different is, well, they are a working classifieds! Again, this should be a good source of short-term work or jobs that you don’t really want but will be willing to do while you keep hunting for that career break.

Check in at the Community Center
communitycenter.cn/classesoverview
The Community Center in Shanghai was founded by some of the old guard from the Community Services Center in Tianmu (one of many examples of “Taiwan refugees” who have made The Move that you are considering). If you know people at the Center here, get them to introduce you over there. Better yet, walk in and volunteer to help. And if it means teaching, give it some serious thought: you’ll be networking with professionals, tai-tais, and “guy-tais” as well. Not a bad way to hit the ground running

Go to church
If you practice some organised religion, seek out the international community of members in Shanghai. There probably will be one, and it likely will be composed of a broad cross section of society. I was active in the Catholic community, and found the parish to be an incredible resource of friends, contacts, and professionals of all stripe: from the heads of multinational regional centres to housekeepers to diplomats to students to musicians. This is the same as in any major city around the world (including Taipei) but being in a soulless capitalist haven like Shanghai kind of helps us all feel like we are on the same side (and, uh, being a soulless haven of capitalism is partly why we love the place).[/quote]

Let me shake your hand if I ever meet you in person. Thanks! :thumbsup:

The church idea would be an interesting one if I were already living in China. But, unfortunately, I’m a godless heathen who was brought up Jewish, so the it doesn’t seem so promising for me. I tried it in Taipei once and was very disappointed with the fellow Jews I met. :whistle:

If church is not your thing. Try a gym!

They have that!

theatlantic.com/internationa … vah/62574/

At my gym in Shanghai, I befriended the former CFO of HBO, who had approached my wife thinking she was a fellow alumni (she was wearing my grad school t-shirt). Too bad I wasn’t in finance (been there, done that) - he was doing private investment in Luzhou.

If you are into sports and bars, there is a thriving softball league of bar-sponsored teams: softballshanghai.com/teams

And don’t forget that every Wednesday at on the 3F of Malone’s in Jing’an District is the ShanghaiExpat.com happy hour.

A good friend of mine is on the board of ActiveKidz (activekidz.org/), which organizes sports and community activities for the children in Shanghai’s expat community. It’s closely tied in with the international schools and diplomatic community (the US consulate allows them to use or rent their huge empty lot in Hongqiao for soccer tournaments). They should welcome sincere volunteers and be a great place to demonstrate what you can do to movers and shakers.

A Pleines Mains (apleinesmains.e-monsite.com/pages/welcome.html) is a French charitable group that runs a second hand books shop and garage sales several times a year to raise money for its beneficiaries. I understand it began in the French Catholic community until the membership got fed up with the diocese, and they no longer associate with the Catholic Church. Like many other charity groups, there is a core group of volunteers who likely are well-connected in the broader international community. My point is that there are many ways to meet people who can either give you great advice or, even, a lead to a job.

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]…I’m a godless heathen who was brought up Jewish, so the it doesn’t seem so promising for me. I tried it in Taipei once and was very disappointed with the fellow Jews I met. :whistle:[/quote]You’d be surprised what you might find there - here is a way to volunteer as a tour guide of the former Jewish Ghetto of Houkou (shanghai-jews.com/1.htm I’d first read about Dvir Bar-Gal’s walking tour in a NY Times article. I balked because when I looked into it, it was above my budget at that time. I’d bet reaching out to the tour operators seeking advice and information about the community there could lead you to something interesting.

And here is a link to the Shanghai Jewish community’s online classifieds: chinajewish.org/SJC/classifieds.htm

But all this advice presumes you will be spending some time (and money) over there walking the streets and knocking on doors. Seeing as you are still wrapping up your degree, you could look for something online first and then use these networking methods to find something better.

While browsing 1111 today, I noticed you can refine your search to China. If you haven’t done that already, give it a try.

Another thought, you might just want to sign on to something that keeps you surrounded by Chinese for a year or something. That’ll keep you going and learning while giving you enough time to find something better. Finding the right job, as we all know, takes a lot of time and luck.