Kaohsiung Mayoral Race, 2006

Does anyone have information about the candidates running in the Kaohsiung Mayoral Race in 2006?

What are the candidates attitudes on foreigners’ rights and other important topics?

Soong 2006! I hope he wins! Maybe we can ban Taiwanese from certain media yet again!

I (in Taipei) would like to know more about this as well. Chen Chu seems to elicit respect from many people. Is she the one to root for?

It’s funny, when Chen Chu stepped down, supposedly to take responsibility for the rioting KTRC workers, some people said she was really doing it in order to run for Kaohsiung mayor, a charge she vigorously denied. And yet here she is, running for Kaohsiung mayor.

Yes, a lying sleazy sack 'o shit. Like we expected anything else?

Wait a minute. Chen Ju is a former Kaohsiung Incident political prisoner who has spent most of her life working on labor issues. She did a great job as CLA Chairwoman and was needlessly sacrificed over the Kaohsiung MRT riot which had nothing to do with her in the first place. She is incorruptible, old school DPP.

Unfortunately, I cannot agree. Many of the problems which “foreign laborers” (broadly interpreted, and including both white collar and blue collar people) face in Taiwan today are directly due to the fact that as Chairwoman of the CLA, Ms. Chen did little or nothing to clarify our rights and responsibilities under the law. (This was despite many people trying to communicate with the CLA and trying to get clear and comprehensive statements of how the Labor Standards Law, Employment Services Act, etc. are/were to be correctly interpreted in regard to the situations of foreigners in the Taiwan area.)

Hence, even up to today here on forumosa.com we have frequent “arguments” and “differences of opinion” regarding the work rights of foreign spouses, and many people constantly asking how their employment contracts are to be arbitrated … now that their employers have decided to unilaterally cancel the contract. Ms. Chen did nothing at the CLA to establish proper procedures for these and many other types of labor problems.

As the Chairwoman of the CLA, she was the central government authority to establish procedures and guidelines for all these types of issues, and she did nothing. In other words, her leadership of the CLA was not effective, and we all suffer because of it.

Well, maybe she also suffered from the “collective stupidity” that is so general in the public workers over here. Believe me, public workers don’t want anything simple, because complicated means hong bao. And complicated means that they have power.
If things are easy, public workers will loose their status, and become paper deliverers and receivers.
In my case, a call from a legislator to the CLA was all that it took for them to understand that a manager from a branch office (which is a foreign investment company) is intitled to the work permit - hey, they asked me to get a contract signed by the manager of the company (me)… how the hell can I sign a contract to me? But all that is bad in the CLA, I believe, is because people are too dumb and too much guanxi is over there, so you cannot expect quality of service. While my wife was getting completelly and totaly frustrated with this (and believe me, she thought she was living in a developped country), I just nod with my head, drawing parallels between the taiwanese and the portuguese public workers…

What is your source for the claim that she vigorously denied this? She had been long seen as a future candidate for the Kaohsiung mayoralty, long before the Thai laborer scandal.

Vorkosigan

Unfortunately, I cannot agree. Many of the problems which “foreign laborers” (broadly interpreted, and including both white collar and blue collar people) face in Taiwan today are directly due to the fact that as Chairwoman of the CLA, Ms. Chen did little or nothing to clarify our rights and responsibilities under the law. [/quote]

Point taken. In her defense, I would say that she was more concerned with the rights of Taiwanese workers during her tenure. The new pension system, gender equality and harassment, and work safety were all areas she made progress on.

The foreign labor/work issue was a mess when she came into office, and you are correct that she did nothing to fix it. I prefer to think that that is because there are such powerful interests that do not want to see any change to this regime.

[quote=“Feiren”]
The new pension system [/quote]

This is a positive development for foreigners? Before we were eligible for public pensions and now, thanks to the Hoklo sense of inclusiveness in the DPP for all ethnicities, we are ineligible. I wouldn’t comment on this as an achievement – at least not for foreigners.

While I respect her as being slightly cleaner (being New Tide) than the Presidential Office people I dealt with in international development (whom I would guess are mostly Justice Alliance), she, like so many DPP bureaucrats, did not change anything at all in the CLA and was inept at dealing with bureaucratic matters requiring a “technocrat’s touch.”. Furthermore, she could have opened her mouth after the riots and went after blood in her own party. While stepping down, above all, she still played the party hack. These “Justice Alliance” hacks made my life miserable and the “New Tide” people clucked their tongues but did nothing.

As of last August, I was warning people how bad the Presidential Office people were and was telling people if they went digging they would find lots and lots of dirt. In the end, considering all the scandals, my words have been prophetic.

Anyways, Ms. Ju is not the populist she makes herself out to be. She lives in my apartment complex and is rather arrogant and aloof from what other people tell me.

What is your source for the claim that she vigorously denied this? She had been long seen as a future candidate for the Kaohsiung mayoralty, long before the Thai laborer scandal.

Vorkosigan[/quote]

News stories at the time. Perhaps because she’s been seen as a candidate, people were quicker to accuse her of simply stepping down to run for mayor rather than to take responsibility for anything.