Ko Wen-je


#121

Oh, it’s a problem, but I’d say that to solve the issue it’d be better for the powers-that-be to focus on the working culture and the attitudes of the men. It’s not the women that are the security issue - it’s the circumstances in which they’re stuck.

A moment last week that brought home the absurd working culture: my wife was trying to arrange dinner with her brother and sister. She called them at 9pm at night - and they were both still in their offices. No bloody wonder they’re both single.


#122

[quote=“Mr He”]
He actually has a point - females here with a bit of education do not get enough babies, and that’s a problem. 1/3 of Taipei’s 35 year old women are single, not married, and no kids. It is a huge problem.[/quote]
And why are people not having babies?
This place is terrible for both parents and kids.


#123

[quote=“antarcticbeech”][quote=“Mawvellous”]There’s a lot to like about him, but his conservative/patriarchal side is really troubling.

What’s he doing speaking at fundamentalist christian organizations like 幸福聯盟 and referring to unmarried women as a “national security” problem?[/quote]

Are they giving secrets to the Chinese? Are they not breeding enough? :laughing: Someone told me about that remark yesterday but they couldn’t explain to me in what sense Ko Wen-je considers them a problem (although they did say he probably didn’t intend to say national security problem). Can anyone shed any light?[/quote]

The national security thing I came across in a city govt. propaganda piece I was editing today. This is an old concept: less married Taiwanese having children means more importing of “foreign brides” which means a threat to national security due to more foreigners and miscegenation of the “Han” race or some such nonsense. Its racist, pure and simple. Every couple of months a legislator comes out with it in the LY. Think about the ramifications; this country has now reached a stage where it has to import its manual labor, its domestic labor, and its “breeders”. But it treats them all worse than it treats its pet dogs.


#124

[quote=“lostinasia”]Oh, it’s a problem, but I’d say that to solve the issue it’d be better for the powers-that-be to focus on the working culture and the attitudes of the men. It’s not the women that are the security issue - it’s the circumstances in which they’re stuck.

A moment last week that brought home the absurd working culture: my wife was trying to arrange dinner with her brother and sister. She called them at 9pm at night - and they were both still in their offices. No bloody wonder they’re both single.[/quote]

Welcome to Japan! :smiley:

What do you expect geriatric male politicians in a patriarchal society to think and say about this situation?

Welcome the the 18th century! :wink:

How about this?
The problem is material well-being: make sure the average person is poor and you’ll get all the babies you need to supply industry and the army with bodies.

:doh: :loco: :roflmao:


#125

[quote=“Gain”]
And why are people not having babies?
This place is terrible for both parents and kids.[/quote]

If it’s so terrible, why are you here?

I understand that Niger has the highest birth rate in the world. Sounds like paradise.

Of course, Niger is not your only option. Nearby Mali, Chad and Somalia are other choice destinations. If you need some help finding a new place to live, check this out:

indexmundi.com/facts/indicat … YN.CBRT.IN


#126

let’s choose the worse shitholes for comparison…


#127

[quote=“Dog’s_Breakfast”][quote=“Gain”]
And why are people not having babies?
This place is terrible for both parents and kids.[/quote]

If it’s so terrible, why are you here?

I understand that Niger has the highest birth rate in the world. Sounds like paradise.

Of course, Niger is not your only option. Nearby Mali, Chad and Somalia are other choice destinations. If you need some help finding a new place to live, check this out:

indexmundi.com/facts/indicat … YN.CBRT.IN[/quote]
It’s like saying Taiwan’s corruption or air pollution is not that bad compares to [insert some random shitholes’ names].

Taiwan is not a good place for parents and kids, you can’t defend that. Here, the food security is awful, education is awful, housing is awful, working hours are awful, and salaries are certainly nothing short of awful.
If you want to pretend like this is some kind of mother-friendly country and a couple could totally raise a child with 30k NTD per month, that’s your choice, just that most people disagree.


#128

some of us choose not to have kids. this is the best choice for our children, and for your children…


#129

chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/nati … leader.htm

“Buddhist leader faults Ko over Tzu Chi project”. Tzu Chi is also quite popular here in Los Angeles. If Ko doesn’t change or the people around him doesn’t manage him better, I predict that he will be a one-termer.


#130

tzu chi build massive temples and buildings everywhere, they
aren’t above being questioned.


#131

[quote=“headhonchoII”]tzu chi build massive temples and buildings everywhere, they
aren’t above being questioned.[/quote]

While most of its work is highly commendable, there are some Tzu Chi practices that have been criticized here and abroad before. they are not without fail. This Neihu project of theirs has been on the news a lot, rather controversial for such a “helpful” plan.

Problem, as said, is that Tzu Chji has deep pockets and lots of radio/TV airtime.

Ko is a guy that when asked “what do you think of X or Y?” is smart enough to have an opinion, but as said, not as cunning as to know when to shut up. refreshing indeed, but dangerous. Not being elected for another term is rather mild. The death threats have ben piling up.

A to the issue of children here, sometimes I think the situation here is worse than Central America. Anyone who can votes with their feet and leaves. Both sides of the political spectrum. Last Sunday I was taking out the garbage and became the source of neighbor conflict. The exgovernment employee -whose house is filled with government issued furniture- started to “teach” me about Chinese culture when he was interrupted by another retiree -exprivate company worker- who corrected him that it was Taiwanese culture what he should be talking about. Both have worked in the US, both have US passports, and their kids -well, 30 to 40 something married adults- are also in the US. What will happen to that generation? Will they also choose to retire in Taiwan? They have properties here. Is that the only link to Taiwan, a real estate moneymaking machine? Up to when? What will happen when it is not profitable? Keep on feeding the bubble?


#132

[quote=“Dirt”]http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/national/national-news/2015/02/24/429555/Buddhist-leader.htm

“Buddhist leader faults Ko over Tzu Chi project”. Tzu Chi is also quite popular here in Los Angeles. If Ko doesn’t change or the people around him doesn’t manage him better, I predict that he will be a one-termer.[/quote]

A lot of people don’t like Tzu Chi and other large Buddhist groups. The are very elitist and have too cosy ties with the Kmt and think of land as something they are entitled yo from the state. I doubt anyone who cares about this issue, that is supports the unfettered rights of big buddha, is also a Ko supporter.


#133

should see some of tzu chis projects , one I saw in Hualien recently , far too massive, they don’t have a clue about ‘the environment’ and are also addicted to concrete.


#134

the only plus side about tzuchi projects is that at least it has some design…

however, since tzuchi isn’t a worship only community, they also so community service, search and rescue, recycling, elderly care, and so on, perhaps they do need larger facilities. many other religious organizations are copying tzuchi tho, and build fugly buildings at scenic areas or water reservoirs.

there are only two modern religious complexes here in Taiwan which deserves acknowledgement. One is Xiangguang at Daxi, the other is Dharma Drum at Jinshan.


#135

From today’s Taipei Times:

Ko plays down housing loan comment
taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003612127

“…Ko also advocated imposing heavy taxes on homes bigger than 20 ping (66m2)…”

Is he fucking kidding? A 20-ping house is a closet, though indeed many people in Taipei are forced to live in such cramped quarters. A typical family of four can be reasonably comfortable living in a 40-ping house. It is not so unusual for a middle class family to own a 60-ping house outside of central Taipei, though at current prices in Taipei proper that would cost a bundle.

It’s hard for me to see how forcing people into smaller apartments is going to lower housing prices in Taipei. Although land is scarce, this is a city where you can always build taller buildings. It’s not for lack of space to build that prices are high, it’s rampant speculation that’s driving the market.

If Ma Ying-jeou or any KMT politician in Taipei made such a statement, the DPP, Taipei Times and the Forumosa majority green contingent would go ballistic. But it’s Ko, so he gets a pass.

Really, if he doesn’t start to think before he opens his mouth, he’s not even going to be a one-term mayor.


#136

Dog you aren’t making any sense. Property taxes in Taiwan are absurdly low. According to Commonwealth Magazine they are about 25x lowe than in the US and 40x lower than Tokyo.

Furthermore imposing heavy taxes on unoccupied apartments is common in the west.

Raising taxes would help dampen speculation. The Ma government has been trying for 7 years to tackle this but EVERYTIME the water their own proposals down at the end.


#137

Higher property taxes on second houses and unoccupied houses would make a lot of sense. Really, it would. We need to get the property speculation bit well and truly out of this market.


#138

The legislature ARE the property speculators (and stock speculators)
one and the same,
so that’s why they gut every attempt at capital gains taxes or property ownership taxes.


#139

It’s laughably easy to get around the second home taxes…you just move one of your family’s hukou to that house for a period…it’s all an elaborate scam…


#140

What need to do is tax the owners of 40 homes, the big Monster Landlords/landladies, properly. That would be a start. Loans for second homes? These people may take loans for the 3rd home, the rest 19 pay by themselves. It would be good to restrain people from overextending to a second home -investment by itself, not probable for renting as per current market behavior- and when the hard landing comes, lose both home sand their shirts. If they want to purchase a home for their kids, do it under the kids’ name and kid’s own steam. That way we can try to avoid the parents leave everything to the lazy son and the 5 daughters before him that supported the parents are left penniless. One hopes.

What is the sale price currently in Taipei of any over 20 ping apartment? It is certainly not 6 million, nor 12, maybe 20 like in Xindian. Interestingly, most people purchase those shoe box apartments of less than 10 ping for about 20 million around “famous” school districts so their kids can go there. So the speculation with properties is tied down to the whole system, education, political, etc. Hukou is a burden now. It is a very complicated process, by which a lot of people are being cheated. Prices are artificially inflated, and the ones that should pay taxes don’t. We have a real problem as people can’t afford to live in the city, not even its vicinity as gentrification takes over. Overtime, no socialization, break up of society’s structure, no more children, no healthy environments. All because of greed. All connected to property hogging.