Lars von Trier movies

I love Lars Von Trier and I’m a fan of Nicole kidman too. I gotta see this. How about for the Weekly Movie group?

I agree with Alien on the Coens. Great movies and Fargo was not the greatest.

Brian

[quote=“Alien”]Saw several good films in Sydney:

Dogville–Nicole Kidman does the big screen as a stage number. Deeply engrossing and darkly comic film about moral standards and crowd mentalities. It’ll make you think. [/quote]

Alien, thanks for the heads up. I love Lars Von Trier, so I do hope it shows here.

imdb.com/title/tt0276919/

[quote=“sandman”]The fake retards one was von Trier? I did not know that (loved the film).

Dogville’s out now on DVD. Bloody amazing.
[/quote]

WHERE, WHERE, WHERE???

Fake retards = The Idiots

Got it, but no English Sub Titles, my Danish doesn’t cut the mustard.

[quote=“Alleycat”][quote=“sandman”]The fake retards one was von Trier? I did not know that (loved the film).

Dogville’s out now on DVD. Bloody amazing.
[/quote]

WHERE, WHERE, WHERE???

Fake retards = The Idiots

Got it, but no English Sub Titles, my Danish doesn’t cut the mustard.[/quote]
Dogville’s in KPS and Asia 1.

Sandy,
Dogville’s very very good, innit? After we saw it, we went out and drank a couple bottles of wine to mull it over. Definately a ‘thinking’ film. That director also did Bjork’s Dancer in the Dark, which was also one of those ponderous celluloid things. He does seem to have a thing about rape scenes though, or women who’re victimised…
Imagine how brutal Dogville would have been with real sets.

I’m surprised it didn’t get Oscar nods. But neither did Kill Bill, which I watched AGAIN with a couple other Tarrentino-ites, and liked even more.

Dancer in the Dark. Whoever would have thought the Sandman would have had a lump in his throat watching Bjork take the long drop?

[quote]Imagine how brutal Dogville would have been with real sets.
[/quote]
I dunno. I thought it was already pretty damn brutal! In fact, one of the things that struck me the most about Dogville was how (seemingly) effortlessly von Trier managed to suspend my belief so early on in the film and maintain the suspension all the way through (except for the way the actors pretended to turn door handles when they went in and out of rooms – for some reason, that action really jarred – I’d have cut that if I’d been the director, but then, I’d also have had naked nubile cheerleaders doing calisthenics, so what do I know?)
As far as I’m concerned, I WAS watching that film on real sets and I swear the dog was real enough that I could have scratched its ears.

It joins the list of the best films I’ve ever seen.

yes very thought-provoking that dogville…need to watch it again just to clarify the moral issues at the base of it…fav. moment was when nicole did the uturn and issued the edict kill the fuckers…(whoops did i just give it away?

I saw Dogville a few days ago too. I also loved it. Lars Von Trier might be edging his way into my list of top five directors. I don’t remember Zentropa very well, but remember liking it. Breaking the Waves was good, but a little disturbing. I really enjoyed The Idiots. And I thought Dancer in the Dark was bloody fantastic.

Dogville was at least as good as any of his previous works I thought - probably better. I also thought ‘what the fuck is this stage set stuff, I hope this is just for the introduction’, and then completely forgot about it. I wonder if he was deliberately following Brecht’s ideas of anti-realism - ie trying to remove the audience a step in order to force them to thin more about the content of the performance. How does this fit in with the theories behind Dogma 95 (whatever those were - I’ve forgotten). Anyway, I really admire Lars for so clearly trying to work outside the mainstreams of cinematic convention, and actually managing to succeed without it seeming like some horrible undergrad project.

Although I normally don’t think ‘the filmmaker’s message’ or the ‘meaning’ of a film are that important, this is one of those films that you can’t help thinking about. What analogies was he trying to make here. Was Dogville America, smalltown America, or what? If it’s analogy, who was Grace and who was the Bettany character (forgot his name)? How about biblical analogy (her name is Grace)? A lot to think about.

As for availability, my standard corner video store hadit on DVD, region 3 with no special features.

Maybe the mods would like to split these threads into a Dogville topic?

Brian

[quote=“Bu Lai En”]I saw Dogville a few days ago too. I also loved it. Lars Von Trier might be edging his way into my list of top five directors. I don’t remember Zentropa very well, but remember liking it. Breaking the Waves was good, but a little disturbing. I really enjoyed The Idiots. And I thought Dancer in the Dark was bloody fantastic.

Dogville was at least as good as any of his previous works I thought - probably better. I also thought ‘what the fuck is this stage set stuff, I hope this is just for the introduction’, and then completely forgot about it. I wonder if he was deliberately following Brecht’s ideas of anti-realism - ie trying to remove the audience a step in order to force them to thin more about the content of the performance. How does this fit in with the theories behind Dogma 95 (whatever those were - I’ve forgotten). Anyway, I really admire Lars for so clearly trying to work outside the mainstreams of cinematic convention, and actually managing to succeed without it seeming like some horrible undergrad project.

Although I normally don’t think ‘the filmmaker’s message’ or the ‘meaning’ of a film are that important, this is one of those films that you can’t help thinking about. What analogies was he trying to make here. Was Dogville America, smalltown America, or what? If it’s analogy, who was Grace and who was the Bettany character (forgot his name)? How about biblical analogy (her name is Grace)? A lot to think about.

As for availability, my standard corner video store hadit on DVD, region 3 with no special features.

Maybe the mods would like to split these threads into a Dogville topic?

Brian[/quote]

Von Trier has a thing for female Christ-figures. Bess and Bjork both are. In Breaking the Waves, Bess is stabbed in the abdomen, if I recall correctly. Bjork in Dancer dies so that her son may see. There are loads of references: the minister answering the call from Bess’ husband another.

Although I can’t wait to see it, Dogville will have to wait till next week.

A little off topic, when I was in London in 1998, I missed getting tickets for a stage play in which Nicole beared all by a few hours. Oh dearie, were we disappointed. Can’t for the life of me remeber the name of the play, Blue something or other.

[quote]A little off topic, when I was in London in 1998, I missed getting tickets for a stage play in which Nicole beared all by a few hours. Oh dearie, were we disappointed. Can’t for the life of me remeber the name of the play, Blue something or other.
[/quote]

The Blue Room? I was in London at the same time (though too London-poor to go to shows). That play was making quite a sensation though.

Brian

btw…if youse eva get the chance check out von trier’s first work…the tv series “the kingdom”…a ghost story set in a haunted hospital it is fucking mental…i’ve seen the odd copy in bbuster…

Loved Dogville too. Also its music (Schubert?). But I think he over did it with the hand-held camera. Anybody know what “Dogville Confession” is? It’s showing at Spot alongside Dogville and Dancer in the Dark.

it’d be real fun to do a production of dogville in taipei no? goes without saying it would transfer to the stage well…could bring in the bamboo union to take the place of james caan and his stooges…we’d just need to find a hot repalcement for nicole…

I’d love to rent this. Does it have English? And does the DVD cover have English?

cover has english but dont know if dvd has english subtitles…dialogue is all danish (not swedish)…there is a kingdom 2 out which is the 2nd series…i saw them all in 2 marathon sessions at the now defunct jackie chan multiplex…

I got the region 1 verison (with English subtitles) of The Kingdom from the DVD store on Longquan Jie in Shida market. Only problem is it ends on a real cliffhanger, and I haven’t seen 2 yet.

Brian

I’ve seen Kingdom II on Jing Long Road, at the Asia One.

Yeah I loved the Kingdom. It was unbelievable. I liked the mentally handicap couple the best. They were more ‘in touch’ with what was going down than the rest of the bunch there.

Hans

I think he has borrowed from Greek Tragedy and quite successfully. Kind of like the Bacchae…A god visits earth and assumes the guise of a local…all hell breaks loose…

The residents of the town are not meant to be indicative of American society, but humanity at large. Most of the criticism I have read on the film tends to be rampant, reactionary Americanism and has missed the bigger picture.

I thought DitD was very moving and dark (no pun intended)…but Dogville has broken the mold for filmakers…brilliant premise and mis-en-scene…

and Sandy, I really liked the door opening SFX…see Lily Tomlin’s one woman show…I think it’s called The Search for Intelligent Life or something like that…granted, it’s a film of a stage show, which I normally abhor, but the tightness of the sound cues has always inspired me to pay special attention to creating the score for the plays I’ve directed.

[quote]I think he has borrowed from Greek Tragedy and quite successfully. Kind of like the Bacchae…A god visits earth and assumes the guise of a local…all hell breaks loose…
[/quote]

Von Trier has always toyed with this, but I think the source is also has an obscure Northern European mythos formula…definitely at the roots of tragedy…“seeking the soul hole of existence” and “sweeping up the dust from under yer feet” intent. Two early films Element of Crime and Medea are both worth seeking out. Element of Crime is so dodgy, surreal and campy that it’s worth it even tho it doesn’t “work well”. Medea is a very very black anguish that rings very true and is quite powerful, it’s one of my favorite more memorable films. Both are successful post-modern commentaries to boot. I like the re-rendering of the past so that it more easily applies to the present. Something that Julie Traymor pulled off in Titus ala Peter Greenaway.