Locals do not like living near the Sea

Would love to find a place like this to live in Taiwan. It seems everyone I talk to,would never live by the Sea. This is not because of a Tsunami concern but for reasons like,too windy,isolated,Country folk???. It’s a shame because there are a few really beautiful spots that could have been tastefully developed with Local people.on these lines…NOT big Hotels and Rich developers. I fully appreciate that most places should be left in their Natural state,I am just curious as to why this attitude?. (Kenting aside)
Some rules seem to actually inhibit the Taiwanese in many things that they make here!
The saga with my bike is an example (can’t pass test with any extras fitted)Cars the same,Big boatbuilding companies here…but you can’t own one,so few Marinas, and it seems there is no viable reason for these rules?
Maybe I just have not been here long enough yet.Meanwhile, I can dream :popcorn:

Don’t forget how powerful typhoons are. Also it was prohibited to be on large parts of the coast for decades.

That said there are plenty of fishing villages near the ocean, but they are not particularly pretty places, usually they are dirt poor.

Living by the sea means that you are a laborer and nobody wants to be a labeled as a laborer.

[quote=“shiadoa”]

Would love to find a place like this to live in Taiwan. It seems everyone I talk to,would never live by the Sea. This is not because of a Tsunami concern but for reasons like,too windy,isolated,Country folk???. It’s a shame because there are a few really beautiful spots that could have been tastefully developed with Local people.on these lines…NOT big Hotels and Rich developers. I fully appreciate that most places should be left in their Natural state,I am just curious as to why this attitude?. (Kending aside)
Some rules seem to actually inhibit the Taiwanese in many things that they make here!
The saga with my bike is an example (can’t pass test with any extras fitted)Cars the same,Big boatbuilding companies here…but you can’t own one,so few Marinas, and it seems there is no viable reason for these rules?
Maybe I just have not been here long enough yet.Meanwhile, I can dream :popcorn:[/quote]

Locals like living near the city, and don’t like sunshine…

There are a couple of coves that slightly resemble that picture but in a Taiwanese sort of way… Bitoushan and Longdong south of Keelung are beautiful in their own way. I really like the area (for Taiwan) and considered renting an apartment there for weekends and holidays, but between the weather, distance, remoteness… decided to just get a hotel when in the area.

:unamused: Fengshui. That’s and there are lots of ghosts in the ocean.

There are places that COULD look like that if the central government was bothered its arse about sprucing Taiwan up.

I disagree. I believe that and only that, is what is going to happen to Taiwan when and if locals discover the pleasures of living on the coast. Taiwanese don’t like quaint, simple and peculiar. They like luxurious, convenient and standard. I for one am thankful that Taiwanese keep away from their own coasts.

Well as the title says, most locals do not care for living near the sea. Now there are big bucks for renting places to stay on the coast for tourists (hotels/B&Bs), so expect to see a lot of development. I was in Penghu again recently, very enjoyable with beautiful beaches, extremely laid back and relaxing, there’s about to be a big wave of development there what with Chinese direct flights about to open and cruise ships planning to dock, let’s see what happens. The place I stayed, Shan Shui, was a run down fishing village that is seeing a lot of B&B’s springing up, most of them are fairly decent, and they haven’t allowed any large developments on the beaches in Penghu…yet.
Penghu is very interesting because it is very well kept and looked after compared to the mainland. They have a 6 month tourist season as the rest of the year they have howling winds which is not exactly attractive to the average retiree or tourist!

Step 1: Start up Monocle Pete’s 'Merican Yacht Club
Step 2: Convince Taiwans elite that they need a yacht if they want to be taken seriously internationally
Step 3: Profit! The elites build mansions next to their yacht docks and now everyone wants in

Well…there are already yachting facilities of sorts built down South but yes, they do not have the cache factor you mentioned and are basically deserted. An interesting idea.

I interviewed the president of a Kaohsiung-based yacht maker (I think it’s called Ocean Alexander, if I recall correctly) last year, and he told me that even though Taiwan builds a huge number of yachts, there are very few of them in Taiwan for two major reasons: first, the necessary infrastructure for refueling and docking is just not there and the government has little incentive to build it (although I suppose an enterprising private company could rise to the occasion); second, once you have the yacht, there’s nowhere for you to go on it. Japan, the Philippines, and China are all too far for a quick yacht ride, and Taiwan’s outlying islands aren’t prepared to receive yachts. So he said in the short term, he has no interest in developing the Taiwan market.

Err… sorry to totally derail the conversation.

How the holy hell do you wangle that question into a conversation with everyone you talk to? :smiley:

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]I interviewed the president of a Kaohsiung-based yacht maker (I think it’s called Ocean Alexander, if I recall correctly) last year, and he told me that even though Taiwan builds a huge number of yachts, there are very few of them in Taiwan for two major reasons: first, the necessary infrastructure for refueling and docking is just not there and the government has little incentive to build it (although I suppose an enterprising private company could rise to the occasion); second, once you have the yacht, there’s nowhere for you to go on it. Japan, the Philippines, and China are all too far for a quick yacht ride, and Taiwan’s outlying islands aren’t prepared to receive yachts. So he said in the short term, he has no interest in developing the Taiwan market.

Err… sorry to totally derail the conversation.[/quote]

The main reason is that there is no culture of yacht sailing. There are actually lots of places to go to if one thinks about it, HK, Okinawa, Taiwan’s outlying islands, lots of harbours in Taiwan proper too. Most older people cant swim, and I guess they are actually afraid of the ocean.

The main reason that there is no yacht culture is that it was illegal to sail a yacht until very recently and most rich people in Taiwan are just not into that kind of more adventurous activity…having very few hobbies at all in fact.

How the holy hell do you wangle that question into a conversation with everyone you talk to? :smiley:[/quote]

Sorry not everyone yet, SK would you like to live by the sea? Every Taiwanese person …I have asked ,almost everyone, I know here if it’s possible to get a property with a “sea” view.
normal answer is ,"why would you want to?’ Southern softy :stuck_out_tongue:

Isn’t Taiwan already humid enough? Living near the sea is not so easy. The salty humid air destroys electronics, heat feels stronger and of course typhoons and tsunami scares are additional.

The wives talk their husbands out of moving near the sea out of fear the salty air will age them

Just a rumour , but seems they rust that close to the sea.

It’s actually cooler by the ocean.

How the holy hell do you wangle that question into a conversation with everyone you talk to? :smiley:[/quote]
I just make them listen to this French number,written in minutes,on a train in France,by Charles Trenet a long long time ago. You may remember it from the Film, “Dirty ,Rotten,Scoundrels” .