Loud and annoying elections

I’m so sick and tired of having absolutely no place for some peace and quiet in the city.

The elections have caused stupid people, who feel there isn’t enough noise pollution in Taipei, to come out and drive cars and scooters with bullhorns, mumbling things nobody can understand, because they feel the need to turn the treble to zero and the bass to 100.

I complain, and like most Taiwanese, they are apathetic, and always quote to me: “What can I do about it? Nothing, this is how it is.”

Taiwanese people seem to think that one person will never make a difference; and that the status quo, regardless how stupid, is there for a reason and should never be changed.

I tell them “What’s the difference, you are all going to elect a retard who steals your money anyways!! Just let me have some peace and quiet!!”

I can’t wait for the elections to be over!!

With constant complaints about noise from people like me, there is now a phone number you can call to complain: Like all other Taiwanese government agencies, they won’t do anything, but at least you now have an outlet to vent.

0800066666 <-- The toll free number… Don’t know if it’s still working but I thought I’d share…

I had people banging and shouting under my bedroom window one pre-election evening. They were repeating the same words over and over. I

Two blink, brilliant post.

I’m happy that there are other people out there who can understand the incredible problem of noise pollution in Taipei.

Everywhere there is unncessary noise, from the incessant announcements in the MRT stations in 4 different languages to the stupid talking ATM machines to the talking escalators to the 500 beat a minute Taiwanese techno that blasts in a most distorted manner out of speakers in the crappy clothing stores at Gongguan.

But the number one offenders are that gang of half wits who ride around on motorized cyclos, collecting old newspapers and other bits of junk. The cyclos are conveniently equipped with a speaker that absolutely BLASTS a HORRIFIC, DRONING recording in Taiwanese that incessantly repeats something about offering money for old newspapers.

The fact that there are several of these guys that visit the neighborhood Monday-Saturday in the early morning is remarkable. And sometimes, even on a Sunday morning at 8 AM, one of them will come tearing through.

Naturally, the neighborhood is used to it, and only the foreigners seem to mind.

At least it’s not as bad as my neighborhood … not only do we have the election mess right now, and the multiple daily trips by the guys on the three-wheeled scooter things look for recycleables, BUT … the “lizhang” (local neighborhood official/leader-dude) has issues … he has “announcements” every single day, at least once, but sometimes as many as three times … including very, very early on weekday mornings. They are blared loudly over the neighborhood speakers which are so crappy that I don’t think anyone can understand them … I certainly have no idea what he’s talking about, and when my Taiwanese friends have heard them, they have no idea what he’s saying either … to top THAT off … when the garbage trucks are coming through (like the music on those things isn’t enough advance notice as it is), about ten minutes before they arrive, the “lizhang” blasts other music over the loudspeakers to let the neighborhood know that the garbage trucks are coming … for ten minutes before we start to hear the actual garbage truck music … which then drones on forever … and no one seems to care!!! :fume:

Did you guys like just come from CKS Airport or something??? :eh:

Welcome to Taipei, Taiwan!

I’m sure this has been the noisiest election campaign I’ve ever experienced here – and I’ve suffered through dozens of them during my many years in Taiwan.

Are those wretched candidates really likely to win even a single vote by virtue of the nerve-shattering row spewing out of the election trucks? Or is paying the drivers/owners of those things just regarded as a legally permissible means of bringing them under one’s patronage and, in effect, buying their votes?

I think you all should move. It is not like that everywhere. TienMu is pretty quiet and when I use to live up on a mountain, there weren’t even any garbage trucks since the community had their own garbage collection. Really, sounds like you guys should change neighborhoods.

KMT has to win so they need to be louder than the others :laughing: and fork out more money for leaflets, annoy people more … sure they’ll win, because no one cares about the noise … it’s election why should we :loco:

Taiwan needs reform in noise pollution as well it seems.

I thought you guys were going to talk more about the messages of the elections. Have you seen the recent New Jersey elections? That, is the core of ugliness.

There have been messages in these campaigns? The only things I’ve heard have been the typical “I’m for reform,” “I’m for advancement,” “I’m for anti-corruption” … the same slogans coming out of both camps, but no real serious, well-layed out plans for how to accomplish these things. I think to many politicians here (and not just in Taiwan, just more pronounced here), getting into public office is just another job, a paycheck, a bunch of perks, and perhaps a little extra “face” thrown in for good measure … they sure as hell don’t even try to do anything positive once they get into office … and if someone (from either side) by some miracle happens to put forth a decent idea, it quickly gets shut down by the other camp simply because it’s the “opposition.” Sure, that kind of thing happens in US politics too, but there are many times when the two sides actually do get together and try to make things work … the “big 13” or whatever they call it in the US Senate (a group of powerful, moderate Republicans and Democrats working together behind the scenes to keep things going) is a good example of that. I haven’t seen anything remotely resembling that here, and don’t expect to.

Some of us don’t have the luxury of big $$$ to live in places like Tianmu or up in the mountains. I, for one, am a poor graduate student, dont’ have a car, and can’t afford to live in a nice posh place. I’ve been here nearly 5 years, have tried moving within the confines of the Taipei metropolitan area (so much as my finances and transportation will allow), and I can’t escape it …

There have been messages in these campaigns? The only things I’ve heard have been the typical “I’m for reform,” “I’m for advancement,” “I’m for anti-corruption” … the same slogans coming out of both camps, but no real serious, well-layed out plans for how to accomplish these things. I think to many politicians here (and not just in Taiwan, just more pronounced here), getting into public office is just another job, a paycheck, a bunch of perks, and perhaps a little extra “face” thrown in for good measure … they sure as hell don’t even try to do anything positive once they get into office … and if someone (from either side) by some miracle happens to put forth a decent idea, it quickly gets shut down by the other camp simply because it’s the “opposition.” Sure, that kind of thing happens in US politics too, but there are many times when the two sides actually do get together and try to make things work … the “big 13” or whatever they call it in the US Senate (a group of powerful, moderate Republicans and Democrats working together behind the scenes to keep things going) is a good example of that. I haven’t seen anything remotely resembling that here, and don’t expect to.[/quote]

sighs. It makes me feel frustrated and sad that the people of Taiwan, have not yet matured to the degree in which the future needs of the people somewhat outweight the immoral politics of the day. On the bright side, its better than what most of the rest of Asia gets. Try fighting Chicomm politics in Guangzhou and you will probably feel much more hopeless. However, Taiwan politics is still not good enough, and the world will not wait for it.

The political atmosphere in Taiwan is so poisonous that the “Opposition” in Taiwan stops everything just to be opposite, even if it will harm the very persons who elected them.

Sometimes I think that if a strange twist of events occured so, both sides will rather kill off their supporters (literally) than be known to “agree with the enemy”.

PS: In New Jersey, Doug Forrester and John Corzine were having very ugly battles over TV, disguisting even, delving into the personal lives of each. However on the other hand, you’re right, at least US politics tries to get something done.

In the PRC, things are getting done, without a general election system.

At the local elections people gather at the meeting hall to hear candidates talk.

Might be worth investigating. :ponder:

Yes, AC, a lot of things are getting done: human rights activists and those who protest against injustice are being beaten, imprisoned and killed; avenues for expressing any kind of dissent are being ever more effectively throttled; those who wield power and their cronies are getting very rich; the environment is being more terribly despoiled than has ever happened anywhere else in the whole of human history; a vast arsenal of offensive weaponry is being built up and aimed at other countries far and near; and much much more in similar vein.

I’d far rather have the noise pollution and denigratory venom of Taiwan’s electioneering than that!

Well, good for you.

But isn’t intriguing that you (and not knowing your biography directly, let’s make this a comment about the general ex-pat community) choose to live in Taiwan where:

a) you don’t have citizenship;
b) you can’t vote and have no voice in elected government.

Why? If democracy and elected government is so important to you, why do you live in a place where you can’t practice either? What is it that really matters when you’re deciding where to call home?

For all but the most self-righteous ideologues, the truth is most people will happily live in a society where they can live a mentally/economically prosperous life, free from fear an dfree from want. This is why millions will continue to happily live in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Saudi Arabia despite the lack of Taiwan’s style of “electioneering” and elected government. This is why you (the general ex-pat) live (or used to live) in Taiwan although you have no say in how you’re ruled. This is also why few Chinese are fleeing for the democratic “freedoms” that can be achieved in the slumbs of Mumbai or Delhi.

China needs more transparency in government; China needs true independent rule of law; China needs prosperity. But the important thing is, as ac says, the PRC is “getting things done”.

[quote=“ac_dropout”]In the PRC, things are getting done, without a general election system.

At the local elections people gather at the meeting hall to hear candidates talk.

Might be worth investigating. :ponder:[/quote]Buhahahaha… :laughing: :laughing: There ain’t no democracy in Communist China. Buahahaha. This is the new Party line this week as that is what CCP broadcast in response to Bush’s statement that the Democractic country of Taiwan is a good model for Communist China. Don’t you PRC/CCP/KMT boys like that? Really, do you really like Communism?

Guys it’s about loud and annoying election campaigns :offtopic:
Back on track now … as it weren’t enough making my life niserable because of the noise, they now encroach on my private living space with their horrable TV ads … terrible I’ve to endure that for almost 3 more weeks … I can’t switch channel because they are on all of them at about the same time … :fume: :frowning:

Are you are that they are only forking out money for leaflets? :smiling_imp:

[quote=“belgian pie”]Guys it’s about loud and annoying election campaigns :offtopic:
Back on track now … as it weren’t enough making my life niserable because of the noise, they now encroach on my private living space with their horrable TV ads … terrible I’ve to endure that for almost 3 more weeks … I can’t switch channel because they are on all of them at about the same time … :fume: :frowning:[/quote]

I don’t mind the fact that there are TV ads. I am ticked off by the fact that the volume on the political ads on TV are at least 50% louder than the program I am watching! It seems Jason Hu seems to think the louder his ads our the more people will vote for him.

[quote=“cctang”]Well, good for you.

But isn’t intriguing that you (and not knowing your biography directly, let’s make this a comment about the general ex-pat community) choose to live in Taiwan where:

a) you don’t have citizenship;
b) you can’t vote and have no voice in elected government.

Why? ".[/quote]

So you think the expats in China are taking up PRC citizenship? An expat is a foreigner not permanently resident in the country they are working in and therefor can’t vote in elections.

Fortunately no loud speaker trucks blasting away up where I live.
Expats in the USA sdon’t vote in the elections and have no vioce in the US government, that’s reserved for citizens. Your post has no point.